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I've just finished watching House M.D's last episode (Everybody Dies), and I had a doubt.

At the end of the episode (when Wilson and House drive across a bridge with their motorcycles, and "Enjoy your Time (It's later than you think)" is playing, it's clear that Wilson will, eventually, die.

Which begs the question: Does House kill himself after he does?

At the end of the day, he only escaped the fire to spend time with Wilson before he dies, he actually faked his own death, so he can't go back do medicine, nor can he just "pop up" to his old colleagues (except for Foreman, who apparently knows his secret).

Plus the last song we hear playing is the same song Amber sang in House's hallucinations when she dies, if I recall correctly.

Does this mean he's going to kill himself after Wilson dies, or is it just a way of reminding us that Wilson will, in facts, die?

  • 2
    I always wanted to see a spinoff/sequel where House is in hiding from the law using fake identities; and still spends his time helping various people by solving their medical mysteries, though without the backing of any hospital equipment. – GendoIkari Dec 18 '16 at 9:19
  • That'd be cool! – Corrado Dec 18 '16 at 13:10
  • @GendoIkari, It happened. He calls himself Eldon Chance and is a neuro-psychologist. He gets caught up in some bad stuff and enlist the help of Earl's brother Randy, who is now a badass somehow. He's no longer limping around or a drug addict. – SiXandSeven8ths Dec 20 '16 at 22:35
  • In a strange twist of fate, House gets a message that a lumberjack in Alaska is suffering from an unknown illness. House comes to his aid and saves his life. In gratitute, Dexter mercy-kills House for his perceived past crimes. – Bill Hileman Dec 14 '18 at 19:22
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I think it's just a reminder that Wilson will die, and that it is inevitable.

It is left in the open what he will do, and left to interpretation. After doing this selfless act for someone, I'm guessing you can follow two approaches:

  • He won't have any other reason to live after Wilson

  • He is selfless and can try to help other people he cares about or meets meanwhile

I believe the second approach, he will explore and eventually find something else to do, simply because he is obsessive about everything. The puzzle never dies.

  • House's need for being a diagnostician is very analogous to his Vicodin addiction. While it is used for good (curing patients/preventing leg pain), there are also negatives that come with it (House's unusual life situation/House's judgment being compromised). House choosing Wilson over being a diagnostician shows that he has finally kicked the habit, in that he does not need the puzzle when his friend needs him more. It's indeed left open what House will do afterwards, but it is implied that he has at least learned to be more sensible about how he approaches his life. – Flater Jul 3 '17 at 9:44
  • @Flater a great analysis, for sure! – BlueMoon93 Jul 3 '17 at 9:49
  • Thanks :) I think this is the main point of the show. House's job is an addiction. First the Vicodin is blamed and he goes to rehab (psych facility). He comes back clean, but again his life derails and he is sent to prison. In prison, he is urged to stop all addictions including his puzzles. But others WANT House to be a doctor since he saves people. House is therefore asked to sacrifice himself (his sanity) because of the good he can do. House's environment steers him in a way (being a doctor) that is not sustainable for House (ruins his life). And that is the lesson he learns in the end. – Flater Jul 3 '17 at 9:54
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Does this mean he's going to kill himself after Wilson dies

House is* prone to do whatever the heck he feels like at the moment, according to whatever logic he just happens to come across at the moment.

  • If he encounters someone who wants to commit suicide (perhaps Wilson in pain) and House thinks that the suicider's reason is stupid, House may decide that he must live as long as he possibly can because that is the job of all living beings. If he feels that is the right thing to do, then he will see it as an imperative to do exactly that.
  • If life seems pointless, House may think that a human's logic should overcome our naturally-implanted tendency to seek out life and comfort. If House's logic determines that ending life seems like the most sensible, logical thing to do, then there would be no talking him out of it. Bye bye, House.
  • If he finds something else that he has to do before he offs himself, then there'd be no talking him out of that. House will pursue his own priorities.

I've found House to frequently be rather unpredictable. What he decides may be highly dependent on something that happens in his life. However, whatever he decides is something that surely* you're not going to have any say in.

 * This whole answer is predicated on what the character of House would do. In reality, history is filled with people who become enlightened, and reformed. Actually, I think that is the whole premise of the last episode. House decided that friendship has value, and he tosses aside everything in order to focus on that friendship. This is an unexpected development that we see in his life, not unlike the reformation that has happened in the lives of many other people. I'm writing this answer based on how we've seen House react throughout the series, in case House reverts a bit back to the House we know. However, if he continues to pursue a new outlook on life which re-defines his character, then House's actions will depend on just how his character changes. Therefore, his actions at a later date will be even more impossible to predict than what I've already stated. This only underscores my point that the answer boils down to:

There's no way for us to know at this time.

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