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Who decides whether to put bloopers in end credits?

I sort of feel like any comedy should pepper the end credits with bloopers, gags, or outtakes. I love them. Is there an industry view on the practice? Does it vary by director or production company?

I assume that any feature-length film would have accumulated a decent number of unintentional bloopers on tape, if not staged gags. Any evidence to confirm or rebut that assumption?

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    I'd also like to comment that the scripted and animated "bloopers" at the end of Monsters, Inc. were just awful. They completely sidestepped what makes bloopers great: mistakes and honest reactions. [steps down from soap box] – BrettFromLA Oct 17 '16 at 20:06
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    Related – sanpaco Oct 18 '16 at 2:16
  • @BrettFromLA - OTOH, I think it was Toy Story that elevated "bloopers" to an art form. I just asked here to see when that started in animated shows. – feetwet Oct 29 '16 at 23:40
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The Producer will pick out a script and coordinate any necessary re-writes to make the story more coherent. They work at the highest level, hiring the people necessary to turn the script into a movie. It is the Director who takes that script and turns it into a vision. The Director determines how to present that script to the audience, from locations to camera angles to lighting and even to end credit fonts. If the Director decides that adding bloopers to end credits is warranted, then they make that decision. it's all part of the vision they present to the audience.

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The director or the producers decide on that.

It could be that there were no bloopers funny enough to be put at the end.

But in some cases the tone of the movie and the emotions and expressions of it would be destroyed if we saw the bloopers, which are some kind of 4-th wall breaking. So the director might not want to destroy the fellings of a movie with a reel of people goofing around.

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