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In episode 10 of The Pacific (2010), Snafu and Sledge head home on a train after the war. By the time they reach Louisiana (Snafu's home), Sledge is sleeping. Instead of waking up Sledge to say goodbye, Snafu takes a long look at Sledge and he leaves the train without ever turning back. However, while exiting he seems hesitant about the decision he has made. Could someone explain the symbolism/meaning of this unceremonious departure? I've seen this motif before such as in the movie Life of Pi.

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I think you're seeing two different things in play here.

Firstly, why doesn't Snafu wake Sledge?

Well, and this is just my interpretation, there's two reasons.

Firstly, he sees Sledge asleep and untroubled...at peace, if you will, even if it's only for a few minutes or hours and doesn't want to disturb someone who has been through the hell that they have shared.

Secondly, they're brother's in arms...nothing more really needs to be said, they know what they mean to each other and it doesn't need to be put into words.

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As to the second part, the hesitation, after leaving Sledge it brings a realisation to Snafu of everything he's about to lose. The brotherhood, the shared experiences...and a new beginning...his life is about to change immeasurably...that gives you pause...in this case, a literal as well as figurative one.

Anyway, my interpretation...for what it's worth.

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    This interpretation is almost certainly correct. There is an additional emotional payoff in the recounting of the history of the characters after the events of the show. Namely, that Snafu finally reunites with his brothers in arms, decades and decades later, after reading Sledge's book With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa. – DukeZhou Aug 20 '16 at 18:40
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I agree with all of the above but must add. Nothing is more precious to a combat veteran than "peaceful sleep". SNAFU knew this and did not wish to disturb it.

  • You should put this under comments of the referred question. First, this is not a answer on itself, second you don't know the order of questions or what's above this answer. – therebelcoder May 26 '17 at 19:48

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