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In the movie A Time to Kill in the final scenes it was shown that the accused was innocent. But from the movie 12 Angry Men we can see that all the jury members must accept the same decision, it cannot be a tie or 75-25 . In the film it doesn't show the actual description how it ends. If one votes guily it can't be proceeded so maybe all might have changed their vote. But they previously sent the confidential voe (Guilty) to the judge.

How can they alter it?

  • I'm not sure what it is that confuses you. The jury made their final decision not before the whole trial ended, they didn't change their vote, since there wasn't an official vote made yet. It's implied that Brigance's final speech changed their mind and they unanimously voted for Not Guilty. Only after that final speech did the jury go into deciding about the verdict. – Napoleon Wilson Feb 7 '15 at 17:48
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    "But they previously sent the confidential voe (Guilty) to the judge." Where are you getting this? There was no jury decision until after the closing statements. – BCdotWEB Feb 7 '15 at 17:49
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This movie is based on the book "A Time to Kill" by John Grisham. I have read it. Acccording to the book, after the verdict is delivered, Jake (the lawyer) goes to meet one of the jury members. That woman was not at home but his husband was, who was on the grand jury which indicted Carl Lee Hailey. He told Jake that when they were all discussing the verdict in the chambers it was almost a tie. Then his wife told everyone to close their eyes and imagine a white girl getting raped by two black men. How would they deliver the verdict in that case? Everyone realized the severity of the crime committed against Tonya (Carl Lee Hailey's daughter who was raped) and thus declared Carl Lee Hailey not guilty. According to the book, on the day before the verdict was delivered, the jury told Noose that they wanted one more day to deliver the final judgement because they felt intimidated by the Ku Klux Klan. They didn't give a judgement to Noose in the first place. There's no question of changing it.

  • Still this doesn't seem to adress the actual question so much (which seems to be footed simply on an incorrect premise). He doesn't seem to be asking what changed the jury's mind, but how they were able to change the verdict after they changed their minds. – Napoleon Wilson Feb 8 '15 at 2:58
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    According to the book, on the day before the verdict was delivered, the jury told Noose that they wanted one more day to deliver the final judgement because they felt intimidated by the Ku Klux Klan. They didn't give a judgement to Noose in the first place. There's no question of changing it – EdmDroid Feb 8 '15 at 3:42
  • You might want to mark my answer as solved if it cleared you doubts :) – EdmDroid Feb 8 '15 at 5:17
  • You might want to add the information from your comment into the answer, since that seems to be the actual answer to the question. – Napoleon Wilson Feb 8 '15 at 13:10
  • Ok Napoleon Wilson done – EdmDroid Feb 8 '15 at 13:10

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