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At the end of Predator we see Anna is on the American helicopter when Dutch gets there.

Why did they allow her on? As far as they were concerned, she was a random stranger at best and a guerilla fighter at worst. Did she explain that the military unit had been attacked by a superpowerful alien and Dutch would be along to vouch for her once he had wiped all the mud off and taken down some expert level booby traps?

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Don't forget that Dillon (Carl Weathers' character) knew that there was more to their mission that what Dutch originally thought. It's plausible that he explained what was going on to some superiors, who authorized the chopper to pick ANYONE up assuming they came out alive.

As for Anna possibly being a guerrilla fighter, unless she had a grenade on her person and was willing to blow herself up with the chopper (sorry, da choppaaa!), the people on the helicopter could easily overpower her. Besides, once the CIA had her in custody, she was able to give some insight into what the Predator was (as Gary Beusey's character explained in Predator 2).

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  • Dillon's mission was different than what he claimed but he did not seem to know about the alien, he thought that there was '2 or 3 men out there at the most' and argued with Dutch's strategy and 'boy scout b******t'. Even if the rescuers had been told a prisoner was being escorted to the pickup up point they would have no way of knowing it was her, they would be expecing the squad with a prisoner. She might well have had a grenade or even just a concealed pistol which she could have fired from a few feet away at the pilot. – Stefan Oct 19 '12 at 15:15
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She was an obviously-distressed unarmed woman.

Why would you rule out altruism? Soldiers--especially soldiers from Western democracies like the USA--routinely render aid to civilians out of the goodness of their own hearts.

She was at the landing zone.

They were called to a specific location and she was there. She was unarmed and afraid. She spoke English well enough to communicate that she had been with Dutch and his men and knew what became of them. Further she could describe the threat they were up against.

The real question is why was she still on the helicopter the next day. That suggests that they returned to base and came back, bringing her with them, which would be unlikely for numerous reasons.

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  • They knew there were terrorist operations in the area, there was no way of knowing whether she was part of it so risking the crew, the group they were picking up and the helicopter is seriously slack! – Stefan Jan 2 at 11:35
  • "... mushroom clouds typically reached their maximum heights in about 10 minutes and could linger “for about an hour or more before being dispersed by the winds.'" – nytimes.com - it was just before daybreak, not the next day. – Mazura Jan 2 at 13:05
  • Taking prisoners who are unarmed, in distress, and are likely to have vital information on a unit you've lost comms with is not slack. – ruffdove Jan 2 at 18:53
  • @Mazura: she was picked up in daylight. Dutch spent the entire night preparing and fighting the predator. The chopper showed up at daybreak. There is no way the helicopter hovered in the area or sat on the ground in hostile territory all night. It must have gone back to base and returned the next day. They wouldn’t have brought the woman on the mission. – ruffdove Jan 22 at 2:01

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