8

So i recently saw Gone Girl and liked it a lot. I love anything David Fincher does. My only question is this.

What exactly did they change about the ending?

There were rumors going around that Gillian Flynn wrote the screenplay with a different ending. Well I read the book and I had a hard time finding the difference between the book's ending and the movies ending.

Anybody know what it was?

0

I have only seen the movie and read the synopsis of the book on the Wikipedia page, The only subtle difference i see from the ending of that to the movie is that in the movie Nick decides to leave Amy when she reveals to him that she killed Desi but decides against it when he hears she is pregnant but in the book it's shown he was ready to write a memoir detailing the truth of Amy's abduction but decides against it when he hears she is pregnant.

  • So all the hub bub about a new ending was because Nick isn't writing the book anymore? Doesn't make any sense everything is exactly the same otherwise – pt18cher Oct 13 '14 at 17:29
  • I honestly feel there is no difference between the either endings because end result was same because Nick decided to stay with Amy. – Dredd Oct 13 '14 at 17:54
  • yeah that's what I'm saying! haha I was all excited for something different and it never came – pt18cher Oct 13 '14 at 17:59
7

There wasn't that much difference between the novel and the movie. Really, the only difference is that instead of both of them writing their memoirs (so to speak), only Amy does this. The fact they stay together and she is pregnant is identical in both works.

Quoting from the Independent:

In the run up to the premiere, Fincher quoted Ben Affleck as saying of Flynn's screenplay, “This is a whole new third act! She literally threw that third act out and started from scratch," but the author has since played this down, saying the reports following it were "greatly exaggerated".

It seems the original basis for this story was that Fincher was disappointed in the box office reaction to his faithful adaptions of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and so supposedly wanted to change the ending. Given Flynn's comments above, it seems likely that these sentiments were either misinterpreted, or never true to begin with.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .