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In The Sign of Three Sherlock said Billy Kincaid the best man he ever knew. Following was his quote about Billy

Billy Kincaid, the Camden Garrotter, best man I ever knew. Vast contributions to charity, never disclosed. Personally managed to save three hospitals from closure and ran the best and safest children's homes in north England. Yes, every now and again there'd be some garrotings, but stacking up the lives saved against the garrotings, on balance I'd say he...

Now I find out that Billy Kincaid is a villain in comics. Now I know creators of Sherlock do not throw any dialogue without any reference.

So is there any connection with comic villain or it's another character from London History or any of original Sherlock Holmes character?

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    The answer is right there in the quote. Vast contributions to charity, never disclosed. Personally managed to save three hospitals from closure and ran the best and safest children's homes in north England. – starsplusplus Jun 1 '14 at 21:17
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    A garotter is someone who strangles people to death, so Sherlock's hero is a charitable man who has killed a few people. A parallel to some aspects of his own character. – user32704 Mar 24 '16 at 21:51
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There is no "Billy Kincaid" on the Baker Street wiki, nor any Kincaids at all. The comic villain you're referring to is from Spawn comics. Not a likely connection. And searching all forms of Garrot on Baker Street only returns:

He is a harmless enough fellow, Parker by name, a garroter by trade, and a remarkable performer upon the Jew's harp.

from The Adventure of the Empty House.

Reading the quote below again:

Billy Kincaid, the Camden Garrotter[sic], best man I ever knew. Vast contributions to charity, never disclosed. Personally managed to save three hospitals from closure and ran the best and safest children's homes in north England. Yes, every now and again there'd be some garrotings, but stacking up the lives saved against the garrotings, on balance I'd say he...

I'd say this sounds like exactly the kind of thing Sherlock would think and say, not realizing that to non-highly-functioning-sociopaths it may (and does) sound completely horrible. It's character-development on-the-fly. Him saying this tells you quite a bit about his personality and his ideas of good / evil in only a couple odd sentences. Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat are clever show-runners and often say more than appears at first glance.

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He's talking about Jimmy Saville. Although Jimmy Saville was a 'childkiller', as in he killed children's minds--by groping/garotting/ raping them--he saved a lot of sick children's lives because of the money he raised for the hospitals and equipment, etc, to treat them. To avoid giving the impression that 'Jimmy Saville' was a 'best man' the writers have renamed him 'Bill Kincaid' after the childkiller comic star.

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    A point with entirely no evidence at all and not even consistent with the balance of the argument Sherlock makes. Not least because Kincaid didn't disclose his charitable work unlike Saville whose charitable work was plausibly done as a cover for his evil child abuse. – matt_black Jan 1 '18 at 16:38
  • I'm not arguing the point Sherlock makes. I'm deducing that the writers of Sherlock are inferring their reference to 'Bill Kincaid' is actually aimed at 'Jimmy Saville'. – Nikki Heywood Jan 3 '18 at 0:40
  • Do you have any proof (i.e. word from the writers) that this was an intentional allusion to Jimmy Savile? Otherwise, to be honest, this seems like less of a "deduction" and more of "something you just made up". – F1Krazy Jan 3 '18 at 8:28

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protected by A J Jan 1 '18 at 10:26

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