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I know that 'Once Upon a Time in the West', 'Duck, You Sucker!' and 'Once Upon a Time in America' are considered technically part of the same trilogy by various sources, but is there any in-universe connection between them? Do I even need to watch the other two before 'Once Upon a Time in America'?

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    What brings you to think they are "technically part of the same trilogy" in the first place, especially when you say that it's unclear if they're related to each other at all? Is it just because they all bear a "Once Upon a Time" title and are from Leone?
    – Napoleon Wilson
    May 27 at 11:06
  • @NapoleonWilson what brings me to think that they are "technically part of the same trilogy" is that both the italian and english wikipedia pages of this movie say so. I got the impression that there is no plot connection by reading something here and there online, but I'm not sure. Which is why I asked the question.
    – 12345
    May 27 at 11:21
  • Thank you, I've adapted the question accordingly.
    – Napoleon Wilson
    May 27 at 11:25

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The link is thematically:

In Leone’s second major trilogy of thematically connected films, sometimes called the Once Upon a Time trilogy — Once Up a Time in the West; Duck, You Sucker (also titled, Once Upon a Time… the Revolution, or A Fistful of Dynamite); and Once Upon a Time in America, the setting is not always the American Old West, and Leone concentrates more on the “rituals preceding violence than on the violence itself.” In Leone’s first trilogy of Westerns, the Dollars Trilogy, the protagonist doesn’t change, although those around him often do, if only because of his violent acts. In the Once Upon a Time trilogy, instead of there being a single protagonist, who is most often considered the “hero” of the story though he is neither moral nor “good,” there are at least two protagonists, and they do change during the course of each individual film’s story, which is “unusual” for Leone characters.

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