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What's it called when a character mentions something, and the scene immediately cuts to that thing?

For example, in Game of Thrones Season 4 Episode 4, when

Littlefinger mentions that his new friends killed Joffrey, a jump cut follows onto Olenna.

Another example is the Attack on Titan anime, in episode 2x12 around 13 minutes in, where

Ymir says, that there is still hope inside the walls and a cut captures Historia. (The viewer didn't know back then, that she's a special character)

This cut appears very often where a character in the scene mentions another character or an action, and the camera cuts to these characters or that action.

What is this cutting or storytelling technique called?

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    editing........ Nov 3 '21 at 15:29
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    similar to tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/AnswerCut
    – Kitkat
    Nov 3 '21 at 17:42
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    @Anatoly the linked trope above is exactly why I am serious. While you could have specifically named cuts, what you are mentioning is how nearly every single cut is made in any good movie or TV show. In fact, it is bad editing that puts two scenes together which are not related. Nov 3 '21 at 17:48
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    @JasonPSallinger I'm not sure if that is always true--sometimes the point of certian scenes being paired together is about misdirection and not always direction. Anatoly is being pretty specific about talking about a character and then cutting to them--I'm not saying it isn't common, but not every scene talks about one character and then immediately jumps to it. I saw no Jango Fett in S2 of the Mandalorian and he was brought up a couple of times by Boba. Is that bad editing, or actually giving Star Wars fans some benefit of the doubt that we already know who that is and what he looks like? :p Nov 4 '21 at 16:42
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    But Answer Cut explicitly requires a Question to be asked? Or does it support a more broad definition where it's basically cut towards the mentioned topic?
    – Anatoly
    Nov 4 '21 at 17:52
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Initially, I would have said the cutaway since it is supposed to parallel the lines of action and guide the audience to a subtle conclusion (even foreshadowing which they call Chekov's Gun). In terms of writing its called lampshading, that I know for a fact - it is well used in fiction. There probably is a very specific term for it, but my textbook doesn't have a name other than a cutaway and a lengthy explanation at how transitions work. Editing consists mostly of match cuts, jump cuts, j and l cuts, montage, and cutting on action, because it all has to flow with the plot. Direct storytelling is another way to describe that. Hope that helped a bit.

Edit: Just noticed in the comments someone mentioned Answer Cut and now I look like a fool :) Added links to help explain some terms

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  • Maybe lampshading is what I might look for if I understand it correctly. Is it something similar like the Answer Cut?
    – Anatoly
    Nov 4 '21 at 14:55
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    @GalacticNebula interesting answer, but I think it would benefit if you could provide some credible links to either lampshading and/or cutaway. Nov 4 '21 at 16:45

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