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While watching Chowder on Hulu I noticed that some items like clothing seem to have a static background while characters move, giving an illusion that the design or pattern on their clothing is changing:

I've seen this happen in other cartoons before, though I can't seem to accurately find any other examples at the moment. I originally thought this was a special form of parallax texturing, but I can't find anything on the web describing it in more detail.


What is this technique called?

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TV Tropes (warning: massive time-sink!) calls this "Unmoving Plaid", but the article also claims that the technical term is apparently "perspective-incorrect texturing". Googling that term only brings up results for the opposite, perspective-correct texturing (i.e. textures that correctly follow the perspective of the object they're applied to), so I'm unsure whether "perspective-incorrect texturing" is actually an established term in the animation industry, but either that or Unmoving Plaid would be the names I'd apply to it.

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    "Perspective-incorrect texturing" is a reference to how early realtime 3D renderers interpolated texture coordinates using linear interpolation, which produced incorrect results for obliquely oriented surfaces; see benmandrew.com/articles/js-table-renderer for a fuller description. It has little or nothing to do with the effect shown here, which (if you were determined to use the language of 3D rendering, despite this not being 3D rendering) might be called "world-space texturing".
    – Sneftel
    Oct 18 at 10:31
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I don't know what the term for this is within filmmaking/animation, but as a computer graphics technique this is referred to as a "world space texture". For example, see how things look about 6 seconds into this video:

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    Oh, interesting! I didn't know it was used in game design, and I write games as a hobby lol +1 Oct 27 at 13:56
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    It's not commonly used for characters' clothes like the question here (although I've often thought about trying it) but it is very common for environment textures. For example, triplanar texturing is a special case of world space textures..
    – jhocking
    Oct 27 at 14:01

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