3

In Dexter Season 6 episode 7 named Nebraska, Dexter travels to Nebraska to investigate a possible resurgence of the Trinity Killer. In this episode, he's accompanied by his brother as his imaginary friend, instead of the usual Harry Morgan. There's a scene where an innkeeper threatens Dexter with a gun, and Dexter kills him with a pitchfork in self defense.

Immediately after the kill, we see this frame, which resembles a famous painting I have seen before, where a man and a woman are standing in front of an old house. I cannot recall its name.

Is this a deliberate Easter egg regarding that painting, and what's its name?

enter image description here

0
3

Yes, this is a historical painting called "American Gothic", created in 1930.

It is widely used for parody, reasons are off topic here (it's kind of a meme, before the time of memes), but just one thing to prove it is this screenshot from Sponge Bob:

Sponge Bob American Gothic parody

So, this is just another parody, made with the spirit of Dexter TV show.

3
  • @ToddWilcox I know, but it's really beyond the scope of this site, I think. You gave the answer first, but as comment. You can write a new answer, with more explanation about the painting itself. :) Aug 22 at 15:16
  • There’s a long and rich history of directors and cinematographers using paintings as inspiration for shots. It’s almost easier to create a list of movies and shows where this wasn’t done as opposed to where it was. From that point of view, I’m not sure that “parody” is the best word for the practice. Most viewers don’t notice the references to paintings, and many paintings used as inspiration are not famous. To me, parody is meant to be noticed. I think the word “inspiration” is closer to the mark. Aug 22 at 15:17
  • @Todd well my suggestion still stands, think it can be helpful to get another answer here, with more focus on the painting itself. And "parody" appeared everywhere I searched, so looks correct. Though admit not digging very deep. (random blog posts.) Aug 22 at 15:20

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .