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In several episodes remarks are made about the Jaffa. Sometimes to the effect that Jaffa are not human, sometimes hinting at some link between the two but usually implying that a Jaffa would not be able to become the host of the larval Goa'uld s/he is "incubating".

In episode "The Other Side" (S04/02) the leader of the Eurondans has a brief dialogue with Te'alc:

Alar: You are not of their kin?

Te'alc: I am in fact a Jaffa ... though like you our ancestors are descendants of the Tau'ri.

So if the Jaffa are descendants of ancient humans what makes them so different? Why can't they become Goa'uld hosts themselves? Has this been explained in SG-1 lore and I merely missed it?

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  • Many, many, species on Earth share a common ancestor and are today genetically incompatible with one another. Humans not being Goa'uld-compatible isn't particularly far-fetched in and of itself. – Flater Apr 13 at 22:03
  • @Flater but some related species are indeed able to interbreed. Sometimes it results in infertile offspring, but not always. Also, I am not questioning the fact but rather am interested in what the official lore has to say about it. Thanks. – 0xC0000022L Apr 13 at 22:17
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The origins of the Jaffa aren't given much detail in the series - however, apart from the symbiote pouch and the improved immunity from hosting the symbiote, they don't appear to be much different from humans.

We do know that the first prim'ta - the placing of the symbiote - took place on Dakara (season 8's Reckoning), but not exactly when.

We also see Hathor (in her season 1 appearance) turn O'Neill into a Jaffa by creating a symbiote pouch in his abdomen using some kind of a device - implying this was how the first Jaffa were created.

As to why they don't make good hosts - I think season 4's The First Ones just says outright that its impossible, though it doesn't say why.

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