0

In Better Call Saul season 5 episode 6 ("Wexler vs Goodman"), Jimmy totally surprised Kim in a meeting at which they had verbally agreed on a reasonable settlement of a case. Instead, Jimmy demanded 5 million for the land owner (his client) and threatened to harass the banker (Kim's client) with frivolous lawsuits and reputation-damaging television ads.

Back at their apartment, Kim is furious with Jimmy for making her look like a fool and reaching a deal with the banker--against her advice--to settle and make the TV ads go away. Then, when Jimmy asks how to fix it, instead of breaking up with him, she asks "Maybe we get married?"

Why did she ask to marry someone she was so furious with?

2
  • maybe because she liked what he did? Could be sarcasm or appreciating what he did. Hasn't watch the show though. just speculation
    – Vishwa
    Jan 19 at 6:49
  • I have edited this post to give more details and clarity, but I did so more than 5 days after it was asked and I lack the 3K rep needed to vote to re-open. If anyone with the necessary rep agrees that my edits make this a viable question, please vote to re-open. Thanks.
    – ruffdove
    Jan 26 at 17:15
6

They got married for spousal privilege so Jimmy could commit to a full disclosure policy in the future.

There is a practical element to the proposal. Jimmy’s main defense for what he did was that not knowing it was coming protected Kim legally from the illegality of what Jimmy did. By being married, they would have spousal privilege and Jimmy would not have to keep her in the dark to protect her. Then she could institute her full disclosure policy on Jimmy and such disclosures would be protected.

Jimmy even says to Hewel before the wedding that spousal privilege is the reason they’re doing it.

3
  • Yeah, it's what she says, but it actually isn't true (spousal privilege does not apply if she is asked to testify about matters pre-dating the marriage). And it doesn't explain why she'd do this: why would she stay with Jimmy and even marry him when she could just walk away and leave it all behind? Especially when earlier in the episode we see her refusing to enter her mom's car because her mom is drunk; instead she walks the three miles carrying her cello. Kim sets boundaries -- and yet by marrying Jimmy she clearly steps over one.
    – BCdotWEB
    Jan 27 at 15:43
  • That’s correct, but irrelevant. Kim was protected in the Mesa Verde case because at the time it occurred, she was unwitting and since the guy took the deal, there is really no chance of that coming back to bite them. The reason she wants spousal privilege is for future instances. This way she and Jimmy can safely have the “full disclosure” policy where he tells her everything that he would normally keep from her—which is necessary for her to stay with him.
    – ruffdove
    Jan 27 at 16:00
  • That she stays with him at all is because she loves him; she doesn’t want to walk away and leave it all behind. Her love for Jimmy is depicted on the show as almost an addiction. The marriage is a way to keep him and protect herself—addicts will often find a way to “have it both ways.” With her drunk mom and the cello, there was no way to have it both ways since she couldn’t drive yet.
    – ruffdove
    Jan 27 at 16:04
-1

According to this review:

But that would be too abrupt an exit for the show’s most beloved character, and too simple a transition from Jimmy to Saul, especially with nearly a season-and-a-half of the series to go. Instead, the episode ends with a reminder that Kim is an addict, too; her weakness just happens to be for lovable but damaged people like her boyfriend and occasional partner in crime. So even though she has just spent several minutes clearly articulating why she can’t trust Jimmy and they are better off going their separate ways, she concludes the episode by suggesting, “Or maybe we get married.”

It is a terrible idea. Even Kim seems to know it. This is not a romantic proposal in any way, but the brainstorm of a defeated woman who recognizes that, for once, she’s too weak to pick up her cello and walk away. She’s going to hop in and ride along until they’re run off the road. As someone deeply invested in the life of this fictional character turning out OK, it’s something I don’t want to see. But as a masochist who loves this show and its predecessor most when they’re at their ugliest and most punishing, I can’t wait to see how Seehorn, Odenkirk, and company play out the car wreck that’s clearly coming.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .