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So I just re-watched Thor and I started wondering how Thor is actually allowed to wield his hammer. The whole starting point for the movie is Thor taking revenge against the Frost Giants for disturbing his coronation by going to kill them all.

To me, that act of revenge and brutality would make the user of Mjolnir not worthy. Being worthy shouldn't include holding grudges and behaving out of anger.

I know that at the end of the movie he redeems himself and after that he doesn't take revenge but it still shouldn't make him worthy because of that one act surely?

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    So you don't think you can redeem yourself for mistakes made earlier in your life? This is the whole arc of the story. Odin thinks Thor's impulsive act makes him unworthy and removes all his powers to help him learn a lesson. He learns the lesson. He gets his powers and the hammer back. Whether or not you believe that makes him worthy isn't important, its whether Odin or the hammer's magic believes he is redeemed that is important. – iandotkelly Sep 12 '20 at 15:24
  • @JamesM - Why do you accuse Thor of holding grudges and behaving out of anger, as though those were his main faults, when ye also say that Thor went off to kill all the Frost Giants. By seeking to committ genocide against the Frost Giants Thor was seeking to committ crimes agains humanity (or against intelligent beings). Surely that is far more important and evil than "holding grudges and behaving out of anger". – M. A. Golding Sep 12 '20 at 15:38
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    I really see no reason why this question should be closed. For those of you who did VTC, I'd be curious to know your reasoning. +1 to this question because it's actually a decent question. (the reasoning of the OP may or may not be a little off but the question is still just as valid.) – Charles Sep 14 '20 at 1:59
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It was because of the humility and love for humans that he learned throughout the film.

The specific attributes of Thor that Odin cites when he declares him unworthy include vain, greedy, cruel, impatient, arrogant, and stupid. When Loki sends the Destroyer to attack earth, Thor humbles himself before Loki and is willing to give his own life to protect earth. It is pretty much all summed up in the speech that he gives to Loki at the beginning of this clip:

Brother, whatever I have done to wrong you, whatever I have done to lead you to do this, I am truly sorry. But these people are innocent. Taking their lives will gain you nothing. So take mine, and end this.

What he says to Loki here sums up the change that he went through throughout the film. Thor of the beginning wouldn't have said anything like that; he was far too arrogant.

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The worthiness enchantement is put by Odin right after Thor banishment.
During all the first act with frost giants, the hammer does not have this enchantement, so basically anyone strong enough should be able to wield it (barring any other enchantement we don't know about).

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  • This does not answer the question posed. – Paulie_D Sep 14 '20 at 6:43
  • @Paulie_D Given that the OP's question is using his actions against the frost giants as the reason for his unworthiness; it is not clear whether the OP is asking what makes Thor worthy by the end of the film rather than what makes him worthy at the beginning of the film. If the OP meant the latter, then this answer answers that. – GendoIkari Sep 14 '20 at 12:54
  • @GendoIkari: The question seems to make it clear that Thor's actions towards the frost giants are (allegedly) irredeemable and the source of the question's supposition that Thor should never have regained his worthiness. Specifically: "at the end of the movie he redeems himself and after that he doesn't take revenge but it still shouldn't make him worthy because of that one act surely?" That "one act" being his self sacrifice at the end of the movie, as we don't see Thor redeeming himself (in a noteworthy manner) before then. – Flater Sep 17 '20 at 23:16
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I know that at the end of the movie he redeems himself and after that he doesn't take revenge but it still shouldn't make him worthy because of that one act surely?

You're asking us to judge the outcome of a movie based on your opinion on whether Thor can redeem himself. As far as the movie goes, your opinion does not steer it.

Mjölnir's enchantment considered Thor to have regained his worthiness. That's the entire point of Mjölnir's enchantment, how the plot resolves itself, and how Mjölnir behaves across the MCU movies.

Second-guessing the plot based on a difference of opinion is pointless. The plot contradicts your argument directly, and the movie isn't going to change because you think it should've gone differently.

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