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I have finished all of the first 5 seasons of Game of Thrones, and just starting on Game of Thrones Season 6 Episode 1. So refrain from spoilers, if you can.

In the opening scene of Season 6 Episode 1, Davos is the first who finds out that Jon Snow is stabbed, repeatedly, by the rebellious fraction of the Night Watch. In the opening scene Davos sees Jon lying not so far away from his quarters, and therefore starting from his room, Davos can arrive pretty quickly on the scene-- we can thus conclude that he is close to where it happens when it happens.

My question is, why does no one hear what's going on when the mutiny happens? Davos and others are men with hardened military experience, so sleeping too soundly to have noticed what is going on simply isn't a very convincing explanation.

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What reasoning do you have to assume that others must invariably have heard it? Maybe they did, maybe they didn't. The show runners clearly suggest they didn't. What makes you discount that possibility, other than "maybe they did hear it"?

The only argument you bring is:

Starting from his room he arrives pretty quickly on the scene-- we can thus conclude that he is close to where it happens when it happens.

But there are two issues with that reasoning.

Firstly, Jon doesn't necessarily sleep close to the other's sleeping quarters. He is the Lord Commander after all.

Secondly, you can't rely on the timing of the scene here. If Jon needed to walk for a solid minute or two (quickly, as he was in a hurry), he can cover a reasonable distance to be away from where he started, but it would be a very boring minute of screen time that would have most definitely been cut/shortened to keep the pace of the scene going.

So there's no real argument to discount that the others simply did not hear what was going on.

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  • In the scene Davos sees Snow lying not very far away from his quarter. And this is why I said "he arrives pretty quickly on the scene"
    – Graviton
    Commented Dec 23, 2019 at 6:27

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