3

I assume that because (2019) Glass is a movie, and in my experience film makers don't feel they need too much reality to tell a story, that this code is gibberish. But I also wonder if maybe it might be my limited variety of language experience that causes this belief. I am curious as to what languages use the kinds of things in this code.

Change Modifier Value
else if pMParameterMode -- 2 then
(
if PM0fods - undefined and pM0fodsParam - undefined then
(
for ) in 1. modifers do
        )
        try
            (
            if j.name -- pM0ods then
                (
                Old Value - getProperty j pMModsParam
                -- Relative mode only works on Floats. Integers and Point3s
                if (classof OldValue) -- Float or (classof Old Value) -- Integer or (classof OldValue) -- Point3 then
                    (
                    if pMMods -- 2 then set Property j pMModsParam (FinelValue - OldValue) else setProperty j
pMModsParam FinalValue
                    )
                else if (classof OldValue) -- Color or (classof OldValu

This is the code on the last frame of the scene at 1:32:15. In my video it is impossible to tell if the parenthesis () are actually curly braces {}. I preserved what seemed to be spelling errors.

Context: The genius villain Mr. Glass is escaping out of a psychiatric hospital. With the alarms sounding, he rolls his wheelchair up to the computer and types this code. In his next scene he is outside of the hospital with the alarm still blaring.

  • 2
    Hi, Welcome to Movies and TV SE. while this is actually an interesting question, I'm afraid this might fall into off-topic here. Anyway, it doesn't seem a valid programming language AFAIK, but it could be one or it could be one he created for himself or it could be a one that invented(used as a prop) only for the movie.. – Vishwa Jul 17 '19 at 3:34
  • I write several programming languages and can recognize several others. Your code sample is gibberish as is most code I see on screen in movies or tv. I would imagine that the writers or set designers decided to use something that wouldn't compile no matter what while looking like pseudo-code. Related: I've noticed that IP addresses in the 192.168.xxx.xxx and 10.xxx.xxx.xxx subnets are commonly used for external internet IP addresses but are in fact completely reserved for local intranet. I suppose they don't want any viewer with too much time on their hands to actually try contacting the IP. – user18935 Jul 17 '19 at 4:35
  • btw, that code isn't even correct within itself. if pMMods -- 2 then set Property j pMModsParam (FinelValue - OldValue) else setProperty j pMModsParam FinalValue uses set Property j ... then setProperty j ... in the same line. – user18935 Jul 17 '19 at 4:44
  • 2
    He could be inventing his own scripting language or using a DSL. The fact it's WIP could explain the inconsistencies in the code. It's pretty easy to make multiple errors on your first draft, that's what debugging is for! – Bee Jul 17 '19 at 12:31
  • 1
    I agree with @Bee, Mr Glass is supposed to be very intelligent, so it would make sense he created his own language that would appears non working gibberish to other. – dna Jul 18 '19 at 9:24
7

I think it is gibberish, because it lacks consistency. I will ignore typos as the code was a work in progress:

Change Modifier Value

Let's assume Change is a function and Modifier and Value its parameters

else if pMParameterMode -- 2 then

those -- are a comment or an operator? the word "then" is commented?

(
if PM0fods - undefined and pM0fodsParam - undefined then

well, it seems that - is what in any other language would be = or ==, so maybe -- could be what in Javascript or PHP is ===... and the word then is a reserved word of the language...

(
for ) in 1. modifers do
    )

This makes no sense, you cannot use a bracket to close a block and then as a name of a variable, and also after do you would need an opening one, like after then. Besides 1.modifers would need that 1 is something (an object? a data structure? a module?) which has modifers as its property... a function maybe? Very weird syntax.

Maybe if the first closing bracket was a curly one it could be a valid (but weird) name for a variable:

(
for } in i.modifers do
    }

Then } could be an item from a iterable value stored in i.modifiers, but still seems unlikely. And this item must be a function that is called with no params...

    try
        (
        if j.name -- pM0ods then
            (
            Old Value - getProperty j pMModsParam

This makes no sense again, is Old a function and Value its parameter? And if - is a comparator, there is no use for it here, the result is not stored or used.

            -- Relative mode only works on Floats. Integers and Point3s

Now -- is for comments? Unless Relative is a function and it takes a lot of parameters and Floats.Integers is some kind of attribute ... but then we are comparing to nothing. But maybe here the characters are actually -- and in conditionals are "==", then it will make sense.

            if (classof OldValue) -- Float or (classof Old Value) -- Integer or (classof OldValue) -- Point3 then

And now it is a comparator again....

                (
                if pMMods -- 2 then set Property j pMModsParam (FinelValue - OldValue) else setProperty j pMModsParam FinalValue
                )

            else if (classof OldValue) -- Color or (classof OldValu

Incomplete code, but lacks a ( after then and after else.

Conclusion: If we accept possible typos from Mr. Glass or errors from OP recognizing characters (== and --, l and 1, } and )... it could be plausible it is a valid (not real) programming language. If OP got the characters right, then this clearly not a valid code.

Besides, the only language I know who uses undefined is Javascript, and this code isn't.

| improve this answer | |
  • If the op had a hard time determining whether { or ( were being used, I had assumed that - and = could also have been mistaken. – user18935 Jul 17 '19 at 11:57
  • Yes, that's why I am allowing it as a valid operator – Pablo Lozano Jul 17 '19 at 11:59
  • Actually besides the { or (, the only other character that was difficult to discern was 0 (zero). I am about 65% certain that I got the 0 (zeros) correct. I am about 95% certain that I got every other character correct, but I am 100% certain I got the -- and - characters correct. I think if I did make a mistake it would be in the spelling, but I carefully reviewed everything a few times. – Jack J Jul 17 '19 at 16:08
-5

The only language I know that uses "--" to comment out code is Ada

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Lua also uses -- for comments, and the code in the question definitely isn't Lua. From the examples in the wiki page you linked to, it also doesn't appear to be Ada. – Anthony Grist Jul 17 '19 at 9:53
  • 4
    SQL (and PL/SQL) also uses -- for comments – Pablo Lozano Jul 17 '19 at 11:15
  • 2
    if j.name -- pM0ods then usage on -- here doesn't seems intended as a comment – Vishwa Jul 17 '19 at 11:19

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