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Part of it was hobbit nature. The hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier IsildurIsildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was hobbit nature. The hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was hobbit nature. The hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

3 edited for grammar
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Part of it was Hobbithobbit nature. The Hobbitshobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the Hobbitshobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every Hobbithobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other Hobbitshobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the Hobbitshobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the Hobbitshobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different Hobbithobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was Hobbit nature. The Hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the Hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every Hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other Hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the Hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the Hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different Hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was hobbit nature. The hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

2 Corrected spelling and grammar
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Part of it was hobbitHobbit nature. The Hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the Hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in theretheir constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good ( therethere seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every Hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other Hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simplesimply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the Hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not totoo great on the Hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of it'sits own and will work it's selfitself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power he. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings he. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo how everhowever has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it. That -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek it'sits master or create a new Sauron ( kindkind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong willed-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into it'sits will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different Hobbit likeas a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method . Keeping-- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work it'sits will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was hobbit nature. The Hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the Hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in there constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good ( there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every Hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other Hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simple because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the Hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not to great on the Hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of it's own and will work it's self towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power he only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings he wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo how ever has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien and as Mistu4u pointed out there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it. That they could master it. The Ring was evil and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek it's master or create a new Sauron ( kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into it's will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different Hobbit like way of dealing with it probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method . Keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work it's will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

Part of it was Hobbit nature. The Hobbits weren't included as a race that Sauron tried to convert to his power with rings. They were beneath his notice. There seemed to be something exceptional in the Hobbits nature that really only Gandalf seemed to notice. They had a single minded simplistic view of life. This can be seen in their constant desire to not just eat but have a set schedule of eating times. So we have a race that is uncorrupted, basically good (there seems to be no crime in the Shire) and stubborn. Every Hobbit seems content to live their whole life in the Shire and never venture outside except for Bilbo and his nephew Frodo. Even then Gandalf has to basically shanghai them to make them leave. The other Hobbits that adventure with Frodo are brought along simply because they know enough that they would be tortured by Sauron and his minions to get the little bit of information that they do have. So their lives are already in danger.

Now Gollum was originally of a race that was very similar to the Hobbits. Which helps to explain how he has lived so long and also becomes invisible when he wears the ring. The pull of the ring is not too great on the Hobbits because it senses nothing remarkable or exceptional in them. The ring has a will of its own and will work itself towards evil anytime that it can. It takes a strong and stubborn mind to resist it. We see Boromir give in to the will of the ring and he's only near it. Gollum doesn't crave power. He only wants his precious. Bilbo does have cravings. He wants adventure and the ring latches onto that so that we see Bilbo has to give up his ring as well. The fact that he is able to is quite remarkable because he is the first possessor of the ring to willingly give it up. Frodo however has no real desire. He doesn't crave anything. He has what's described as a pure heart, but even he is affected by the ring. Sam is actually the only bearer of the ring that isn't affected by it. This is because he only desires to garden and help his friends. His lack of desire is displayed in his request for rope from the elves. He only debates giving Frodo back the ring because Frodo seems desperate for it as Gollum is.

Sam is actually considered the true hero of the story by Tolkien, and as Mistu4u pointed out, there is a lot of allegory and meaning he put into The Lord of the Rings. Peter Jackson did a lot to interpret his works as faithfully and truthfully as he could and also added elements that come from other books.

Gandalf and Aragorn were wise enough to know that the Ring's will would try to subvert them. Having a part of Sauron's soul inside it, it would convince people as it had Boromir and earlier Isildur that they could defeat Sauron with it -- that they could master it. The Ring was evil, and would always lead those that sought to master it towards evil. It was tricky, very tricky and would always seek its master or create a new Sauron (kind of like Voldemort in Harry Potter with his Horcruxes). Only one pure of heart and free of desire with a strong-willed mind could have carried the Ring without giving into its will. Frodo was the only choice.

Sam could have, but he didn't even have a desire to carry it to be destroyed. He would have tried to find a different Hobbit as a way of dealing with it, probably similar to Bilbo's and Gollum's method -- keeping it close. Except Sam wouldn't have used it at all. He would have simply buried the Ring, which would then find a way to get to someone that it could work its will on. The time had come for it to be destroyed, and only Frodo was the right amount of brave, fearful and adventurous to get the job done.

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