Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…


Edit: Let me add some late specifics...

In the first picture, the girl a) has got a comfortable leverage grip on the boom b) she's used to maintaining that position, it's her job, she does it all the time & c) that "big mic" isn't big at all, it's a small, light mic inside a wind-shield... known as a dead cat.

enter image description here

The boom itself is made of carbon fibre & weighs ounces.

In the 2nd picture - that looks more like the guy is at rest between shots. As they get ready to roll, he will extend the boom to dimensions more akin to the first picture & adopt a similar posture.

The third picture looks a complete nuisance - very restricting.

OK, back to the cynical original...


When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see Who will say "start camera action" when the director casts himself in the main role? ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see Who will say "start camera action" when the director casts himself in the main role? ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…


Edit: Let me add some late specifics...

In the first picture, the girl a) has got a comfortable leverage grip on the boom b) she's used to maintaining that position, it's her job, she does it all the time & c) that "big mic" isn't big at all, it's a small, light mic inside a wind-shield... known as a dead cat.

enter image description here

The boom itself is made of carbon fibre & weighs ounces.

In the 2nd picture - that looks more like the guy is at rest between shots. As they get ready to roll, he will extend the boom to dimensions more akin to the first picture & adopt a similar posture.

The third picture looks a complete nuisance - very restricting.

OK, back to the cynical original...


When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see Who will say "start camera action" when the director casts himself in the main role? ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

4 replaced http://movies.stackexchange.com/ with https://movies.stackexchange.com/
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OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/43215/who-will-say-start-camera-action-when-the-director-casts-himself-in-the-main-r/43217#43217Who will say "start camera action" when the director casts himself in the main role? ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/43215/who-will-say-start-camera-action-when-the-director-casts-himself-in-the-main-r/43217#43217 ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see Who will say "start camera action" when the director casts himself in the main role? ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

3 added 14 characters in body
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OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director &and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD &and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/43215/who-will-say-start-camera-action-when-the-director-casts-himself-in-the-main-r/43217#43217 ] &and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action &and frame &and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd &and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air &and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director & DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD & suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/43215/who-will-say-start-camera-action-when-the-director-casts-himself-in-the-main-r/43217#43217 ] & sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action & frame & there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd & still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air & hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism…

When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside]

The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to behave…

Then they hand over to the 1st AD and suddenly it's all "Lights, Camera, Action" [not real, see http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/43215/who-will-say-start-camera-action-when-the-director-casts-himself-in-the-main-r/43217#43217 ] and sound has seconds to try figure out how to get every nuance of the performance without dropping the mic into frame.

OK, honestly it's not quite as cruel as that; but sound is almost the last consideration when shooting. They have to quickly adapt to a changing action and frame and there simply isn't time to have a comfortable setup to capture the sound.

On a tracking or steady-cam shot there could be as many as 8 or 10 people all huddled in behind the camera, shuffling along. The sound girl/guy has to be able to move with this crowd and still reach the action.

The best that sound can do to ameliorate the aching of their arms is to shout "wait for the plane" when Heathrow is throwing its finest into the air and hope to hear "Hold the roll" from the 1st AD ;)

On the upside, those modern booms are made of carbon fibre & are nowhere near as heavy as they look.

2 added 318 characters in body
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