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Aug
22
comment What is the significance of the last scene in “A Most Wanted Man”?
Maybe related to this question: movies.stackexchange.com/q/23387/49?
Aug
22
answered horror movie about family of murderers
Aug
22
reviewed Reviewed horror movie about family of murderers
Aug
22
asked What are the qualities of Watchmen unique to comics and in which way did the movie achieve to adapt those to the medium of film?
Aug
22
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How do the events in The Day of the Doctor relate to those in The End of Time?
Aug
22
revised Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
edited body
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id But I'm also glad we could at least reach some level of mutual understanding. And I also thank you for giving some motivation and hints how to flesh out my answer a bit more.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Well, I guess they just are, or rather that the question of how they are created by the emitting particles and from what is one of the problems of making this theory into more than a vague possibility. I always had the impression that the whole quantum theory of gravitation curently doesn't consist of much that the mere statement "there might be particles called gravitons which *somehow mediate gravity"* and not much more than that.
Aug
22
revised Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
added 511 characters in body
Aug
22
revised Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
added 511 characters in body
Aug
22
revised Ice cream van song at the end of Bend it Like Beckham
edited tags
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Well, I don't want (or rather can't) talk about any Higgs bosons. They create (or cause, or whatever) mass. The mass then causes the gravitational force which, and that's indeed what I'm saying, is represented by the gravitons. But where this mass came from or what caused it or why it's there I'm not sure we should care at all. Thus I'd rather say that the gravitons are the repentation of the force field 'emitted' by the mass of the objects (wherever that mass came from).
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id They (the gravitons) seem to have to be massless because they are just mediating particles and in order to be transmitted over the (supposedly) infinite distance that gravity seems to work at the (supposedly) immediate speed it seems to work with (however that explainable, though). I don't think Higgs bosons have anything to do with the problem at hand at all or the problem of gravity, other than "causing" objects to have mass, which in turn determines the strength of gravity, which is in turn modeled/expressed/mediated/executed by the exchange of gravitons.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
Yeah, and what I thought was that gravity and its actual realization, the gravitons, are the overall color. What you seem to say is that gravitons are the red color and gravity the overall color.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Hmm, that might be the center of our misunderstanding. What you seem to say is gravity is caused or influenced by gravitons. What I say is that gravity is expressed by gravitons (or "gravity" is the observation/term for exchanged gravitons) and thus gravity = gravitons.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Now that I probably wouldn't sign. It's not likely that those gravitons do hang somewhere around the object infusing it with "gravitational potential" (or whatever). I'd rather think they work like all the other mediating particles, that mediate a force by the absorption and emission of particles. I.e. object A generates a graviton and sends it to object B, which absorbs it and in this way A "executes" a gravitational force on B. More similar to how photons mediate the electromagnetic force. The charge of the force in turn (what the electrons are for EM) would be the mass.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Sure, it's not particularly reasonably worded (and in this order the causality seems strange anyway). Though I for certain did not know that the gravitons are reflected in G and not in F, since at least Wikipedia says that they mediate the gravitational force and I thus assumed more gravitational force F means more gravitons. That might be where I was wrong (while I don't understand why, I probably never will anyway, so nevermind).
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
Though, I'd even go a step further and say that it isn't even so far-fetched, given (and this in turn might not be an accurate assumption) what we currently know and assuming that future revelations won't change everything we know from the ground up. But nevermind, I'm going to litter my answer with some more disclaimers anyway.
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
@invalid_id Wait, but we're still talking about F when talking about "gravity", right?
Aug
22
comment Does After Earth's sci-fi jargon have any basis in reality or is it complete gibberish?
Sure, but the point is, it is a reasonable assumption, and especially sufficiently reasonable for a SciFi movie. I don't think After Earth has any responsibility for rambling about Higgs bosons. Thus saying the (admittedly rather imprecise) statement from the movie is downright wrong (not implying you've done that) would be as wrong as saying it's perfectly correct. Thankfully enough the question wasn't asked on Physics. Suffice to say that gravity and mass are related somehow (and if you'll negate this, I'm going to question your existence ;-)).