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May
4
comment Which film or TV-Show was the first to use a '555-' phone number?
@supercat: Perhaps the Rossmore one is an earlier version using 555 as a dummy phone number (and Rossmore the area code), before 555 came to be used as a dummy area code.
Apr
13
comment First use of on-screen text messages, like in Sherlock and House of Cards
@Katie: I don't suppose you can find any screenshots from Gossip Girl?
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
Harper's New Monthly Magazine was published in the US. It was also serialised in the UK, and it seems a month earlier. Wikipedia says chapters 20-22 were published in instalment VII in September 1852. To confirm, I found a reference in a 5th September Observer newspaper to instalment VII of chapters 20-22, that said chapter 21 is about the Smallweed family (the chapter is titled "The Smallweed Family" in Harper's and elsewhere). Bingo, an antedating!
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
The earliest example I find of this line is from Harper's New Monthly Magazine, which published chapters 20-22 in No. 29 -- October, 1852 --- Vol. 5. Unfortunately it's not clear if this was actually published before or after the 2nd October 1852 Punch.
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
The OED say the cartoon is from 2nd October 1852. Google Books sometime gets dates, titles and pages wrong, especially if full pages aren't shown, so they need to be verified. Good news! I checked Bleak House again, and character Phil Squod (Mr. George's assistant), who often drops vowels, says guv'ner 15 times (but not "'ello guv'nor"). The first is at the end of chapter 21: "Good night, guv'ner."
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: Finally, are you sure it was even used in the 1948 Oliver Twist film? This script makes no mention of guvnor or variants.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: Here is the Punch magazine use, in a later 1886 collection. As the OED says, it's a caption, and you can see the cartoon. It's clearly not Dickens, and the OED doesn't claim it to be.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: I checked Bleak House but find neither this line nor any character named Coster. The book was published in 20 monthly instalments between March 1852 and September 1853, but it appears it was published under its own name (see the first serial's cover and not in Punch magazine.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: For reference, the OED cite you claim is for Dickens' Bleak House is: 1852 Punch 2 Oct. 152/1 (caption) Coster (to extremely genteel person). ‘I say, Guvner, give us a hist with this 'ere bilin' o' greens!’
Feb
18
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@Ben Strange, OED online's first guvnor is from an 1852 Punch ("I say, Guvner...") and there's no "'ello guv-nah" mentioned. But "'ello guv-nah" isn't really a set phrase, just 'ello+guvnor. Oliver Twist was published in 1838 but I don't find any guvner or variants in the book and no "ello gunah" or variants at all in Google Books in the 19th century... If you can find an example in Oliver Twist or the OED 1827 cite, then the OED would be happy for the antedating!
Feb
17
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@Ben: I just searched the OED, but can't find anything for "'ello guv-nah" or variants. What exactly is it listed under?
Mar
12
comment Unrelated Cast Songs for the Credits
@vastra360: Do you have any examples?
Feb
12
comment First use of on-screen text messages, like in Sherlock and House of Cards
Thanks. The article says of House of Cards: David Fincher, who directed the first two episodes of the show, decided that he wanted the texts to appear almost as text bubbles with a pale blue or gray background, depending on who was sending the message, as opposed to showing close-ups of phones. After he proposed the caption idea, Mr. Willimon showed him some clips from "Sherlock," which depicts texts on screen as white subtitles in a Helvetica font, and asked "Is this what you had in mind?" Mr. Fincher "was a bit bummed that it had been done before," he says. "But good ideas are good ideas."
Oct
14
comment What is the first instance of people filing a petition against casting a character?
The website danielcraigisnotbond.com dates from at least September 2006 when it said: "So keep those emails going, sign the petitions, and BOYCOTT this movie!" wayback.archive.org/web/20060901174939/http://… // They linked to the KeepPierceOnAsBond Yahoo group which started in October 2004: wayback.archive.org/web/20060831202957/http://…
May
17
comment Where did flatlining come from?
QI is entertaining but isn't always right.
May
6
comment How is naming done in MI6?
Yes, appears to be just to be a personally assigned number to go along with the 00.
Apr
27
comment Which film has the most direct sequels/prequels?
14 in total. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes_(1939_film_series)
Apr
24
comment What is the most repeated programme on British telly?
This is interesting but doesn't answer the question: what's the most repeated single episode of a television series? Perhaps it'll be an episode from your lists, particularly one that didn't have many series (so each episode has been shown more times).
Apr
17
comment Origin of “knife to a gunfight” quote
@poepje: The Ngram chart, with zero results before 1987, suggests it wasn't a common expression before The Untouchables (1987).
Apr
17
comment Origin of “knife to a gunfight” quote
@poepje: Yes, that's why the 1732 quote is a comment and not in my answer.