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Aug
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
14
awarded  Necromancer
May
22
awarded  Necromancer
May
4
answered When was the first time an author directed the adaptation of their own book?
May
4
revised When was the first time an author directed the adaptation of their own book?
edited body
May
4
revised When was the first time an author directed the adaptation of their own book?
Added dates
May
4
comment Which film or TV-Show was the first to use a '555-' phone number?
@supercat: Perhaps the Rossmore one is an earlier version using 555 as a dummy phone number (and Rossmore the area code), before 555 came to be used as a dummy area code.
Apr
17
awarded  Excavator
Apr
17
revised Identifying martial arts movie (possibly with bodybuilders)
Remove thanks
Apr
16
awarded  Good Question
Apr
14
revised Why is the ending to the film adaptation of “Hannibal” completely different from the novel?
Clarify names
Apr
13
comment First use of on-screen text messages, like in Sherlock and House of Cards
@Katie: I don't suppose you can find any screenshots from Gossip Girl?
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
Harper's New Monthly Magazine was published in the US. It was also serialised in the UK, and it seems a month earlier. Wikipedia says chapters 20-22 were published in instalment VII in September 1852. To confirm, I found a reference in a 5th September Observer newspaper to instalment VII of chapters 20-22, that said chapter 21 is about the Smallweed family (the chapter is titled "The Smallweed Family" in Harper's and elsewhere). Bingo, an antedating!
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
The earliest example I find of this line is from Harper's New Monthly Magazine, which published chapters 20-22 in No. 29 -- October, 1852 --- Vol. 5. Unfortunately it's not clear if this was actually published before or after the 2nd October 1852 Punch.
Feb
21
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
The OED say the cartoon is from 2nd October 1852. Google Books sometime gets dates, titles and pages wrong, especially if full pages aren't shown, so they need to be verified. Good news! I checked Bleak House again, and character Phil Squod (Mr. George's assistant), who often drops vowels, says guv'ner 15 times (but not "'ello guv'nor"). The first is at the end of chapter 21: "Good night, guv'ner."
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: Finally, are you sure it was even used in the 1948 Oliver Twist film? This script makes no mention of guvnor or variants.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: Here is the Punch magazine use, in a later 1886 collection. As the OED says, it's a caption, and you can see the cartoon. It's clearly not Dickens, and the OED doesn't claim it to be.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: I checked Bleak House but find neither this line nor any character named Coster. The book was published in 20 monthly instalments between March 1852 and September 1853, but it appears it was published under its own name (see the first serial's cover and not in Punch magazine.
Feb
19
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@BenPlont: For reference, the OED cite you claim is for Dickens' Bleak House is: 1852 Punch 2 Oct. 152/1 (caption) Coster (to extremely genteel person). ‘I say, Guvner, give us a hist with this 'ere bilin' o' greens!’
Feb
18
comment What's the origin of the “'ello, gov'nor” line?
@Ben Strange, OED online's first guvnor is from an 1852 Punch ("I say, Guvner...") and there's no "'ello guv-nah" mentioned. But "'ello guv-nah" isn't really a set phrase, just 'ello+guvnor. Oliver Twist was published in 1838 but I don't find any guvner or variants in the book and no "ello gunah" or variants at all in Google Books in the 19th century... If you can find an example in Oliver Twist or the OED 1827 cite, then the OED would be happy for the antedating!