270 reputation
17
bio website
location UK
age 60
visits member for 3 years
seen Jul 17 at 14:18

Semi-retired, spending more time than I probably should watching movies through my PC.


Jun
9
comment In “Les diaboliques”, how does Christina feign death?
I agree Les diaboliques contains many ambiguities (including "character motivation" as well as "what happens"). I don't see this as being an outstandingly good or bad aspect of the movie, but there's no doubt in my mind that the 1996 remake goes out of its way to address these issues, and deserves more credit than it's net IMDB rating of 5.1 would suggest.
Feb
23
comment Western with extremely sweat-lathered horses
@AidanO: I'm not sure which bit of what I said in my comment would have made a difference, but please feel free to edit the question to reflect it - or anything else you think might "improve" it. The more I think about it, the more it seems to me questions seeking to identify movies by citing some "iconic scene" may actually become quite useful as part of a "knowledge database". It's usually easy to identify iconic lines of dialogue just through Google, but getting the right search terms for visual elements is a bit trickier - movies.se could end up being quite good for that.
Feb
23
comment Western with extremely sweat-lathered horses
@AidanO: Not my call really, but I would say in the movie it's hardly "sweaty" horses - they look like they've had cans of shaving foam emptied all over them! I thought it was quite striking, and it's possible others may remember the scene but not recall much else about what the movie was about or what it was called. If someone asked on writers.se "I read this book where the narrator wrote of how eating a small tea-cake brought back vivid memories of childhood", would that not be a good question?
Feb
23
comment Western with extremely sweat-lathered horses
@Nobby: I am intrigued, so I probably will (don't tell anyone else, but stuff like that I normally nick via torrents! :)
Feb
23
comment Western with extremely sweat-lathered horses
@Nobby: I haven't seen it - I was never a fan of silent movies, and don't know anything Keaton did after the "talkies" came in. But he must have been on his last legs in that one, since he died in 66 when it was released.
Feb
23
comment Western with extremely sweat-lathered horses
@TylerShads: I do think the "lathered horses" scene, which is very near the end of the movie, is quite memorable. Given it's quite an old movie, someone else may have seen it a long time ago, and only be able to remember that aspect. So unless question and/or answer get many downvotes I guess I'll assume it is a good question. Even if I did happen to find the answer myself!
Feb
19
comment Is the Good, The Bad and The Ugly set before a Fistful of Dollars?
+1 I think people sometimes forget these are just movies, not viewports into some real coherent history. There's an increasing trend for later movies to pander to this. The "suits" in the movie business thought the viewing public would flock to, for example, Alien Resurrection because it contains details that form part of the whole ongoing story, like a soap opera. But a movie is a movie is a movie - prequels and sequels have to stand on their own two feet.
Feb
19
comment Diction in original vs remake of True Grit
Hailee Steinfeld (as Mattie Ross) does an incredibly good job of convincing us that she's "for real" - doubtless with a lot of guidance from the Coens, who presumably selected her for the role anyway. I think we can safely ignore anything Ethan Coen says about whether it's "historically accurate" or not - these guys are in the business of making movies, not teaching historical linguistics. I will admit that aspect in particular of the remake was one of the reasons I thought it was a brilliant film and well worth revisiting. Although for my money Jeff Bridges didn't really cut it here.
Jan
22
comment Kid's pictures in Clint Eastwood's True Crime (1999)
I think I see. You mean it's evocative of the archetypal "innocence of youth". Possibly contrasted with the (re)gained religious faith in which soon-to-be-executed Burchell finds comfort (despite being "innocent" of the crime, he can't actually regain that state of childish "innocence"). Even inattentive viewers could react to this even if they don't consciously notice it being played out - I was sharp enough to notice it right down to the level of that replicated signature, but not sharp enough to appreciate why it was being done in the first place! I'm good with that explanation, thanks!