1,380 reputation
417
bio website svn.apada.nl/svn/…
location Netherlands
age 39
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Music maniac, wanabe musician, Delphi addict.

Delphi is hobby, but quite a serious one I might add. I sincerely like being helpful, and answering questions and come up with solutions are also a kind of nice training for me.

Some of my special interests are: graphics / drawing, component building, and VCL knowledge.


Jul
27
comment Why did Yusuf need to go into the field?
+1 though in this case one might reason that they could have taken Yusuf even deeper with them but which wasn't necessary anymore, because of the changed schedule due to Fischer's subconscious guardians: from that moment the team employed kicks - instead of a set duration - to get up out of a level.
Jul
27
comment Why does Cobb wake up in the water?
Yes, I hadn't interpreted his weary appearance and dull and glass-eyed gaze for evidence of a long search for Saito.
Jul
27
comment Why does Cobb wake up in the water?
+1 And accepted. I completely missed the point from your third paragraph.
Jul
27
accepted Why does Cobb wake up in the water?
Jul
27
answered Why does Cobb wake up in the water?
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
14
answered Why does the prime minister “redistribute” Natalie?
Jul
8
comment Why do you need 6 points to define a location in 3 dimensional space?
most nearby stargate, using the apparent intersection of the three vectors. 9) Finally, you let go the earthlike 3D coordinate system yourself in stating that you don't need an agreed center nor axes. Well... ok, but then you state that having 9,139 possible triangles should make this work. Hmm, maybe the galaxy holds less stargates, but it certainly holds more possible locations for them. This concludes in that there will be locations where stargates wouldn't function because other stargates are more nearby. 3 out of 39 simply isn't enough, period. -1
Jul
8
comment Why do you need 6 points to define a location in 3 dimensional space?
in using vectors as opposed to points is already pretty well explained by Codemwnci: This (using points) is impractical however, because of the level of precision needed in something as massive as space would require a huge number for each axis...this would be impossible for a symbolic representation. If however you use objects as reference points, then you need far less precision, as you can use intersection to give you the precision, as shown in the diagram. Furthermore, the three vectors don't have to intersect: the stargate system calls the
Jul
8
comment Why do you need 6 points to define a location in 3 dimensional space?
assuming a 3D system: when distributed evenly along the three axes, each axis would only have 13 possible coordinates. 6-8) I agree that the movie's/Hollywood's own explanation doesn't satisfy logical geometry completely (because those six constellations will not appear in this orderly fashion within space and there is (almost) no possibility that those 3 vectors even have a common intersection point), but I am quite sure the creators' intention were the cube to be appealing and comprehensible to common audience and that it had less to do with complying to math. However, the finesse/advantage
Jul
8
comment Why do you need 6 points to define a location in 3 dimensional space?
which possibly could be like our 3D system, but we simply don't know. 4) as long as you have enough reference points to choose from. That's exactly right! Your car has certainly more than 39 references to depict a location for the coffee cup while it has much fewer locations to hold the cup than the galaxy to hold a stargate. 5) With 3 symbols out of 39 symbols you can generate 9,139 different combinations, thus max. 9,139 possible locations. That's quite a lot fewer than the 3 million that you grant enough accuracy yourself. Otherwise said,
Jul
8
comment Why do you need 6 points to define a location in 3 dimensional space?
Wow, almost a year has passed since I read this new answer for the first time. You seem to have taken great effort in argumentation against the other answers and in favor of yours. I'd like to refute parts of your answer, per paragraph. 1) In earthlike 3D space, not only three coordinates are needed, but also the definition of its axes which determine origin and direction. You assume the stargate system has that knowledge. 2-4) You seem to relate the question to earthlike conditions while the stargate system may even not be aware of axes. It certainly has its own coordinate system,
May
24
revised On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
added 8 characters in body
May
24
revised On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
added 96 characters in body
May
24
revised On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
deleted 44 characters in body
May
24
comment On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
The hinged door may have explosive bolts, but they do not explode. The door just swings open, although real hard. Remember that she closes the doors afterwards. The question is about the situation with an astronaut on the outside, while you answer for a situation with an astronaut on the inside.
May
24
comment What causes the tension in the strap between Dr. Ryan and Matt?
+1 This is the right answer. Stone was slowed down by the friction of the slipping line in the wreckage. Kowalski obviously had more velocity, which caused an acceleration on Stone. As long as these two (opposite) accelerations exist (that is: as long as the line was slipping), the strap between them is taut.
May
24
revised On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
added 8 characters in body
May
24
comment On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently
The question isn't about explosive hatches, but about hinged hatches.
May
24
answered On two occasions, the main character opens a capsule hatch and the hatch blows open violently