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Jun
18
comment Evidence for and against the ending of Dark Knight Rises
I absolutely agree with all points here, except one: the importance of the title "The Dark Knight Rises" in relation to the ending. The "Rises" most certainly has to refer to Batman, rising above either a) his crime-fighting sabbatical or b) (more likely) him escaping the pit and saving Gotham after Bane's takeover. At the end of the movie, he is no longer the Dark Knight, which makes his title-referenced "Rise" out to be both chronologically late and also quite frankly, underwhelming. TLDR; rising to save Gotham is far more impacting than rising to ... live an anonymous life.
Jun
9
comment Why did Magnussen need to pressure so many people to get to Mycroft?
@NapoleonWilson Ah, the comment was merely to help the reader recall the scene (as in atticae's answer), while also helping not spoil anything.
Jan
22
comment Why did Magnussen need to pressure so many people to get to Mycroft?
I'm accepting this answer because I agree it mostly boils down to needlessly convoluted chains. I'd actually posit that Mrs. Hudson would be a pressure point to John, with how he reacted in the Reichenbach Fall regarding Mrs. Hudson being hurt. In the end, Magnussen could just as well pressured John->Sherlock->Mycroft. John->Sherlock was already demonstrated in the bonfire incident and John->Mary seemed more sensible than Mary->John. All is explicable as Magnussens' hubris.
Jan
14
comment Why did Magnussen need to pressure so many people to get to Mycroft?
I'm more and more inclined to explain it as arrogance, too. In this particular case, Magnussen didn't actually get to one-up Mycroft until after Mary had already been outed AND John had forgiven her. In other words, his play on Mary ended up fruitless--only Sherlock's obsession with trying to win led him to drug Mycroft, which he could have done with or without Mary/John invited to the Christmas party (except then he would've had to go to Appledore alone).
Jan
6
comment What really happened to Michael's mother?
I think in season 4 they consulted M. Night Shymalan...!
Nov
22
comment How many people died during the last battle in Ender's Game?
@Paulster2 I definitely agree with this. Deviating greatly from the book, it is heavily suggested to me that the final battle occurred remotely and humans weren't really at the battle front at all, which takes away hugely from a point once made to Ender by Mazer that ships were not expendable.
Sep
12
comment Evidence for and against the ending of Dark Knight Rises
@ChristianRau whoa, now. Hold it! Bruce is flesh and blood...he can be destroyed; but as a symbol, Batman is everlasting.
Jun
17
comment How does Bane know that Batman is Bruce Wayne?
I would add, however, I think Talia could have figured it out even without Ra's. When you're as intelligent as an al Ghul, you probably can deduce it systematically. I mean, John Blake was no genius and was able to put it together...Talia was orders of magnitude more cunning and had many more resources to boot.
May
31
comment Why was there no narration in The Hunger Games?
Fight club worked wonderfully, for example. The voice-narrated Blade Runner made me want to put a blade to my wrists.
May
29
comment Is there any additional footage of 'The Trial of Captain Hook,' the play Michael starred in on Arrested Development?
Update: this scene is extended in one of the first three episodes of Season 4 (can't remember which), in which Michael as Peter Pan is seen to fly into the 'loose seal (of the court)' pictured at the rear. It's a really contrived return of the clever gag, IMO. There is then a cut during Buster's cry of 'loose seal' in which Lucille unconvincingly responds she is paying attention to the play.
May
14
comment How could Irene Adler text Sherlock without her mobile?
She could have kept the same phone number, though considering her desire to start anew and escape everyone from her past that could be a danger to her, it would seem particularly imprudent. Sherlock after unlocking the phone: "If you’re feeling kind, lock her up; otherwise let her go. I doubt she’ll survive long without her protection." I sure hope she wouldn't reclaim her phone number...
Apr
24
comment In Oblivion how does Julia get pregnant?
I'm a firm believer that parents should be the ones explaining how babies are made.
Feb
19
comment How did Sherlock survive the fall?
Is it likely that jumping into a truck and rolling out a dead body would escape the notice of the sniper(s), though?
Dec
28
comment How did Sherlock survive the fall?
I'm not sure that would be a particular question with any explanation, though.... We take it as a given that he foresaw that he had to fake his death--you and I don't yet know, but we know that Sherlock did (otherwise his talking to Molly and the throwing the agent off the roof had no purpose). We certainly couldn't have known that he would HAVE to jump from the building, but seeing as it would be the only controllable way to fake it and get distance from Moriarty (for whom he couldn't have foreseen suicide), I speculate he would've requested to jump anyway.
Dec
19
comment Are they breathing air in Matrix?
I greatly appreciate that image--that might belong in your answer, as I found it to be very purposefully supportive of how you described the absence of air. Perhaps "this isn't air" might even bridge the gap of ambiguity, in my mind.
Dec
19
comment Are they breathing air in Matrix?
I'd rephrase that slightly. I wouldn't agree that Morpheus means "there is no air", unless he qualified it with something that differentiates it from the air he was breathing before he entered the simulation. When thinking about video games, for example, I wouldn't say to a cinematic sequence where a character is breathing heavily: 'this character isn't breathing air'--the character IS breathing air... he simply is a simulated character with simulated need for simulated air, much like Neo is breathing simulated air in the simulator.
Aug
30
comment Who hired Malcolm Crowe?
The biggest issue I see here is that, despite this "subconscious draw", Malcolm had no justification (even if we take for granted he fell into the roles and rites of his job) for entering the house, sitting down, and then addressing Cole. In other words, having had no communication with Cole's mother, he is little more than a trespasser who is--without parental permission--spending time with Cole.
Aug
21
comment Why did Holmes aim at the explosive rather than at Moriarty?
That highly presumes that the gunshot...a single gunshot would detonate a bomb. And while the explosion would provide a saving distraction...the explosion actually occurring is what I question. Some material for my skepticism: slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2005/12/…
Aug
20
comment Why did Holmes aim at the explosive rather than at Moriarty?
I certainly considered this idea as my own explanation for Sherlock's behavior but I question that reasoning. While shooting Moriarty, as you say, will mean his and Watson's death...shooting the bomb is an uncertain way to get it to detonate, and such a choice could lead to the snipers taking out Sherlock and Watson anyway (the gunshot wouldn't prohibit the snipers in any way) and the bullet may hit (or miss) the explosives in vain. Seems too chancy to me.
Aug
14
comment Why does Weyland have to hide that he was on the ship?
There must be a middle ground between full disclosure and full secrecy, though. What is suspicious about "I--too--believe that the engineers exist, and I want to be there when humanities biggest discovery occurs."