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Mar
24
accepted How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
Mar
23
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
What the question WAS about, is KNOWING what emotional journey the character was intended to be on. That, and the consistency and logic of this journey is vital to my appreciation of any movie. Anyway that's personal preference. But I like this answer; it was the almost complete absence of debate about whether the (face-value) ending WAS in-fact, factually, happy that bugged me. Thank you.
Mar
23
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
The "TERRIFIED" part was from the original question, which was very poorly worded :), and deviated from the purpose of the question. I have accepted the dismissals - for the original question asked, the dismissals were valid.
Mar
19
revised How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
added 5 characters in body
Mar
19
revised How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
added 21 characters in body
Mar
19
revised How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
deleted 8 characters in body
Mar
19
revised How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
Edited for clarity of intent.
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
I think the question comes from the sheer contrast between the apparent happy ending of the story, the fact that whether the ending is truly "happy" has not been discussed, while other flaws (whether or not they are flaws in my or your eyes) have been, is what has been most disturbing to me. My aim was to ask a question of the types 1 and 3 in your comment @Napoleon Wilson, but the frustration of not finding this theme even discussed must have got to me. I don't know how I'll do it, but I'll see if the question can be modified to reflect this. May take some time. Thank you.
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
4 would actually make more sense. I would have been able to completely digest a tragic ending, one where he dies, pointlessly, as the critic does not budge from her stance and the next day, the world simply shrugs and moves on. Given the momentum of the story, that would have made sense. What did NOT make sense is how an INTENSELY unhappy ending was portrayed (and as far as I can see) accepted, as a happy ending.
Mar
19
revised How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
added 61 characters in body; edited title
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
I agree not every movie has to be pleasing. But to not see any reaction to this aspect of the story - that I felt was a strong part of it - was surprising. And I had to ask.
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
Because noone has spoken of the said theme, or any terror hence ensuing - that Riggan has in fact faced no redemption at all. The analogy is simply my attempt to put across HOW far he has failed to be redeemed in the story, since noone has talked about it and perhaps a forced analogy might pull the point out. Whatever analysis and criticism the movie has faced, have related to the form of the movie, the narrowness of the theme to the self-obsession of actors etc. None (that I've read) have raised any doubts about whether Riggan has in fact been redeemed at all. (contd)
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
And hence the question - "How can you not see this?"
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
No, it is an idea. The Avengers does not discuss an idea, whereas a movie like this at least attempts to. Ultimately it becomes about whether an idea is valid, and when a million people around the world endorse it, whether they endorse the idea being communicated as well, which is when you start to think what is going on. Whatever criticism has been spewed about the movie has NOT discussed the idea, and only talked about the self-obsession of the movie etc. That people are apparently BLIND to the idea (even if it's different from what I've described) being put across is what is surprising
Mar
19
comment How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
Or the other message - that validation can only be sought by submitting helplessly to the will and whims of the gatekeepers, and that one is not allowed to have an intrinsic sense of worth or potential, and that one is not capable of anything more, than what the gatekeeper deems, and even the most desperate lunge or screaming your desperation, will ultimately fall on deaf ears and simply be seen as an aspect of the "performance", rather than the ultimate admission of worthlessness and defeat?
Mar
19
asked How come the underlying theme of Birdman is being seen as redemptive, rather than sealing the character's fate as a failure?
Dec
26
awarded  Quorum
Nov
9
awarded  Supporter
Oct
28
awarded  Commentator
Oct
28
comment Star Trek TOS Season 2 - how long does the change in musical style last?
Too bad - I liked what it was like in Season 1, all of it. Including the interaction of Kirk's monologue and the pauses in the music. It was crisp. (of course, surprisingly I don't remember this music being in the Cage!)