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1

They have done this before, actually. Remember the season where Kenny remained dead and they auditioned replacements? This season is notable for being the only one without Kenny as a main character, as he was written off in the previous season. Kenny, however, plays a part in some episodes without appearing and returns at the conclusion of the ...


-3

Chicago Fire and Chicago PD Crossover and Law & Order Arrow and The Flash The Vampire Dairies and The Originals


1

The biggest difference in genre that I can think of: The Simpsons is an animated spin-off from the sketch comedy show The Tracey Ullman Show. Labeling genre can be subjective. Here's my rationale... Genre is defined as: "a categorization of a category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, characterized by similarities in form, style, or ...


3

This thread gives some examples, including the following: Lou Grant was a drama that spun off from the sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show (this was already mentioned in an answer by Walt) The Perry Mason radio show was a soap opera/drama that spawned two TV series. The Edge of Night came first and was a soap opera/drama. A year later came Perry Mason, ...


1

Yes. Off the top of my head, Lou Grant from 1977 was a drama series, yet it was a spin-off of the sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show. [And dang it, I was going to mention Baywatch Nights too! ;)] It also worked the other way in the more obscure example of Beverly Hills Buntz, an NBC comedy with Denis Frantz that ran for one season in the late 80s and was a ...


4

I think an interesting example in this regard might be Baywatch Nights, which was basically a detective crime show, with Mitch Buchannon opening a private investigation agency. I would call this quite a contrast to the rather soap-opera-like lifeguard drama of the original Baywatch this was a spin-off to. And if this wasn't enough, the whole concept of ...


9

Two reasons: So that the film company doesn't lose out on a potential profit if someone buys a domain name associated with a movie/TV show and sells it. Apparently there's a small culture out there to purchase domain names related to a recently-announced movie/TV show, as when the movie company finds out its already registered most of the time they'll pay ...


4

Theory 1: Trade mark ownership for future profits. Maybe they are owners of the trade mark and wish to have the option to use it for something in the future? Trade marks need to be established, one way is to use them in the marketplace so maybe buying it and owning it is marketplace activity? I am not a lawyer, but look at this case to see that trade mark ...


29

My guess: people like me often visit domains in movies/TV shows/books just for fun. If I see the domain is unregistered, I can register it myself and draw traffic from nerds like myself. Basically, I'm letting Sony advertise for me. I can even imply movie affiliation and do terrible things: "Welcome to Sony's secret site! You have cleverly spotted the ...


20

Just a theory, but being able to buy a domain this way is a pretty clear indication that a legitimate company cannot come after the film company to sue for being libelled or defamed for a less than perfect company portrayal. If currently unused, it is an indication there is not a naming conflict to a company that is not well known. The fact that you noticed ...



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