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18

You've already stated the fact British shows tend to have fewer episodes than their American counterparts (see here for a great explanation). However, there are a few other things to consider when discussing Sherlock. From a Digital Spy article: "[The format is] very closely held," [PBS Executive] Eaton told Collider. "Steven [Moffat] crafts them, and ...


12

To quote co-creator Steven Moffat (February 2014): We deal with scheduling. I’ve also got to do 'Doctor Who'. I’ve got no choice about that. That’s the day job. Everyone is a little bit busy. ... If we made 'Sherlock' the ordinary way, and did a run of 6 or 12, it would have been over by now. It would have been done because Martin [Freeman] ...


10

According to an article from TV Guide, the four quadrants are split according to male or female and old or young. From another site about audience demographics, it appears the the old-young split is made at age 25. Edit: Here's an image I found on a site for independent filmmakers:


10

To quote John August (Frankenweenie, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie's Angels...): The highest ranking producer is the showrunner, the man or woman ultimately responsible for the creative direction of the series. Although Showrunner is a function, not a title... ... this person is credited as an Executive Producer. In many cases, he ...


10

Man Vs Wild isn't real. If you watch the DVD extras, Bear introduces us to his team. There's a rope expert, a survival food expert, a medical guy etc. The point of the show is to show us how to survive in those situations. And at the beginning of each show there's a disclaimer stating that he is accompanied by a team of experts. He builds his shelters to ...


9

Beside from explaining rules to viewers who are not familiar with that particular sport, I see many advantages: Normally, the commentators are from a bigger broadcasting company, they have the chance to get exclusive information (e.g., when someone was injured they can tell that the doctors was with him/her or he/she arrived at the hospital) They have a ...


9

The reason is simple. Money. Something you may have noticed about shows with multiple writers versus ones with one or two writers is that the former have a lot more episodes than the latter. Having a lot of writers means you can write more story material, which translates to more episodes which (usually) translates to more money. Another reason is that ...


8

Summarizing from the Wikipedia article on Uniforms of the United States Navy: The USN has three classes of uniform for different uses: Dress (for formal occasions), Service (for daily wear), and Working (for use when other uniform types would be unduly soiled or are otherwise inappropriate). The Working uniforms come in three colour groups, depending on ...


8

As FredH mentioned in his comment, in this particular case most of the gaps in NCIS correspond to political pre-emptions. However, even when there aren't these kinds of special things going on, most shows on the big networks have these kind of breaks. The reason is they are trying to make sure that they have shows for as many sweep periods as possible. ...


7

In some cases I suspect that it's not simply a case of money. In the past I used to help write 'scripts' for LARP events, which are basically like stories. In that case, having a number of writers was very beneficial. Different people had different ideas on how characters would interact with each other and how the story would pan out. If it's a collaborative ...


6

For starters, you have most of your facts wrong on those TV shows: Fox did not pick Arrested Development up for its latest season, it was shown exclusively on Netflix. Fox did not pick Prison Break back up after it canceled it, after the 4th season. Fox was not the first-run network for Freaks And Geeks; it was originally aired, then cancelled, by NBC. ...


6

Shows and movies may do this for several reasons: to keep audiences around for longer, production breaks, financial reasons, actors signed on for other projects that interfere with shooting of a season, to ramp up other projects that needed more time, just to name a few. In the case of Breaking Bad, Brian Cranston indicated that they planned to shoot the ...


5

I don't believe that there's a standard way as they are not credited as such. Showrunners are always credited as Executive Producers. Additionally, they also usually receive credits as a Creator, Writer, and/or a Director. They are all inevitably writers. Looking up IMDb's crew list for: Mad Men suggests that Matthew Weiner is the showrunner Star Trek: ...


5

Production teams and writers decide to break up a season or a movie for several reasons: The Material is simply too much for one season or movie, but cannot be converted to another episode/season. The initial cost estimate was for a limited season only, but later they changed it to have more episodes or parts. Sometimes, when the list of episodes is large ...


5

Because not all viewers have in depth knowledge about the game, its rules, intricacies, strategies and nuances. Commentators also usually know more about the participating teams and players and their histories. So in that way, commentators add an extra level of information for viewers who may not have that information handy but would find it enjoyable. Also, ...


4

It's just you. They sound nothing like one another. Not even close. AFV theme: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6-l_LxppVM La Bamba: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp6j5HJ-Cok


4

In Arnold Kane's autobiography, My Meteoric Rise to Obscurity, he fondly remembers his involvement with the production of Make Your own Kind of Music, a one-hour music/variety program that aired in 1971. He says We wrote all the scripts before production started It was only an eight-episode summer-replacement series, but it seems to meet the ...


4

There can be numerous reasons. You have to remember that media like TV shows and film have to cover stories in a far more restricted timeframe than print media can. This means they can't dwell on story lines or certain characters for too long. This May result in shallower character development, characters being dropped, added, or altered. You may also have ...


4

It depends on the show in question. First of all, apart from the obvious live programs, TV Shows are filmed well in advance, and usually have at least a half-dozen episodes in some stage of post-production at a time. Dramas that are cancelled in this middle of their production season will definitely have leftover episodes. (This is one reason networks ...


3

From the Wikipedia entry for the Bodyswap episode: This was the first episode to be recorded without the live studio audience. Technical difficulties of the actors playing other characters meant that the scenes would have to have been done twice. Instead the voices were dubbed over the scenes in post-production and trying to match up with lip movements ...


3

There are four episodes according to Wikipedia. And six episodes according to Google's sidebar: S1, Ep6 We Are Gentlemen Nov 4, 2013 S1, Ep5 We Are Wingmen Oct 28, 2013 S1, Ep4 We Are Learning to Swim Oct 21, 2013 S1, Ep3 We Are One Night Stands Oct 14, 2013 S1, Ep2 We are Dognappers Oct 07, 2013 S1, Ep1 Pilot ...


2

The BBC recorded and broadcast a series of 37 Shakespeare plays. So that's a series which was completely written (hundreds of years) before filming began. I don't know if you'd consider 37 episodes to be short. I'd say it's long compared to most UK TV series, but perhaps fairly short compared to most US TV series. There have also been various adaptations ...


2

Show Runners is essentially just another term for Executive Producer. The show runner is responsible for the day-to-day work involved in a tv series and often combine the main roles of writer, director and editor. In a nutshell: It's the title for the person who has overall control.


2

The British show SPACED consisted of two "series" each 7 episodes long. Each series was completely written before filming began. It allowed them to have more natural call-backs and to keep a more strict control over the tone of the program. It's also brilliant and funny and made by the chaps who brought us Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World's End.


2

The complex answer is yes and no. Sitcoms are "situation comedies" and therefore require a comedic value to situations. Let's be clear, the average person doesn't have 23 comedic situations per year. There may be that many or more misunderstandings, but most misunderstandings in romantic relations (let's skip politics) can be corrected before it escalates to ...


2

First of all, a sitcom is about one thing, being funny. In order to be funny, sitcoms sometimes play off of stereotypes about cultures. Stereotypes should never be used by one culture to judge another culture. An excerpt from the wikipage on the subject: A stereotype is a thought that may be adopted about specific types of individuals or certain ways ...


2

The oldest film I found: Rufus Jones for President (1933), (21.min): Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected president of the USA in this short musical comedy. Features song and dance numbers by a seven year old 'Sammy Davis Jr.'. It is only a dream and a short film. In 1972 followed James Earl Jones in The Man: When the President and Speaker of ...


2

There is always a gap to bridge when adapting a book/comic/graphic novel into a TV show. A graphic novel is not addressing the same audience as the TV show. There is even a difference between the ways such literary works are adapted for Movies and TV shows. Given the episodic release format for the shows spanning over different seasons, the makers try to ...


2

From the Wikipedia Page for Let's Make a Deal: Prizes generally are either a legitimate prize, cash, or a "Zonk". Legitimate prizes run the gamut of what is typically given away on game shows, including trips, electronics, furniture, appliances, and cars. Zonks are unwanted booby prizes (e.g., live animals, large amounts of food, fake money, fake ...


2

None Bear Grylls shows are "real" in the sense that they depict actual events. They are staged documentaries which demonstrate Grylls performing tasks which: Never fail Allow him to find and obtain all of the necessary components for his bushcraft demonstrations Don't show Grylls being injured or becoming serious ill from being in a remote location Use ...



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