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44

According to The Tommy Westphall Universe Hypothesis, nearly all of American television takes place in the mind of an autistic child. The theory first appeared in 2002, when writer Dwayne McDuffie wrote Six Degrees of St. Elsewhere for the Slush Factory. For those of you don’t know, St. Elsewhere was a slick, well written and acted drama series about ...


29

My guess: people like me often visit domains in movies/TV shows/books just for fun. If I see the domain is unregistered, I can register it myself and draw traffic from nerds like myself. Basically, I'm letting Sony advertise for me. I can even imply movie affiliation and do terrible things: "Welcome to Sony's secret site! You have cleverly spotted the ...


20

Just a theory, but being able to buy a domain this way is a pretty clear indication that a legitimate company cannot come after the film company to sue for being libelled or defamed for a less than perfect company portrayal. If currently unused, it is an indication there is not a naming conflict to a company that is not well known. The fact that you noticed ...


18

You've already stated the fact British shows tend to have fewer episodes than their American counterparts (see here for a great explanation). However, there are a few other things to consider when discussing Sherlock. From a Digital Spy article: "[The format is] very closely held," [PBS Executive] Eaton told Collider. "Steven [Moffat] crafts them, and ...


16

Detective John Munch, played by the same actor, Richard Belzer, has appeared in at least a single episode of the following distinct television series, though in some cases, multiple episodes: "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" "30 Rock" "The Wire" "Arrested Development" "Law & Order: Trial by Jury" "The Beat" "Law & Order" "Homicide: Life on ...


14

To quote co-creator Steven Moffat (February 2014): We deal with scheduling. I’ve also got to do 'Doctor Who'. I’ve got no choice about that. That’s the day job. Everyone is a little bit busy. ... If we made 'Sherlock' the ordinary way, and did a run of 6 or 12, it would have been over by now. It would have been done because Martin [Freeman] ...


13

It's quite a rare occurrence, with two major exceptions: comedies and factual programmes. Comedy remakes: Red Dwarf which was remade in the USA (one pilot episode) with Robert Llewellyn as Kryten in both versions, and he was also joined by the original series writers, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. The IT Crowd also suffered a US pilot in which Richard Ayoade ...


10

The reason is simple. Money. Something you may have noticed about shows with multiple writers versus ones with one or two writers is that the former have a lot more episodes than the latter. Having a lot of writers means you can write more story material, which translates to more episodes which (usually) translates to more money. Another reason is that ...


10

Beside from explaining rules to viewers who are not familiar with that particular sport, I see many advantages: Normally, the commentators are from a bigger broadcasting company, they have the chance to get exclusive information (e.g., when someone was injured they can tell that the doctors was with him/her or he/she arrived at the hospital) They have a ...


9

Two reasons: So that the film company doesn't lose out on a potential profit if someone buys a domain name associated with a movie/TV show and sells it. Apparently there's a small culture out there to purchase domain names related to a recently-announced movie/TV show, as when the movie company finds out its already registered most of the time they'll pay ...


7

TV has become, in the opinion of many Directors/Actors, the most creatively fertile ground. In the last few years we have seen an exodus of talent from Hollywood, and those who have left have been so provoked by the current climate of film making they have felt the need to not only abandon the Hollywood system, but make public declarations as to their ...


7

In some cases I suspect that it's not simply a case of money. In the past I used to help write 'scripts' for LARP events, which are basically like stories. In that case, having a number of writers was very beneficial. Different people had different ideas on how characters would interact with each other and how the story would pan out. If it's a collaborative ...


6

Because not all viewers have in depth knowledge about the game, its rules, intricacies, strategies and nuances. Commentators also usually know more about the participating teams and players and their histories. So in that way, commentators add an extra level of information for viewers who may not have that information handy but would find it enjoyable. Also, ...


5

This is a really interesting question. I've tried to find some sort of list of "banned" television shows, but I came up completely empty. You are of course right that many directors and producers have complained about movies being damaged by content ratings, but not television shows. I did find some possible reasons why though. To begin, it's worth ...


4

I think Andrew Martin's answer provides the main reason why this never happens: Shows usually get censored by the network, not by TV content rating standards. So showrunners will obviously blame the network if anyone. This happens a lot, Family Guy for example, which often pushes the boundaries, regularly makes jokes within the episodes about their network ...


4

I think it has to do with how technology has changed since then. During that time, we could only 'time-shift' TV shows with: VCRs (notoriously hard to program) Betamax (while it lasted) Now we have: DVRs (TiVo, from your TV service provider, etc) Internet/Digital video services (Netflix, Hulu, network websites) DVDs and Blu rays. Video On-demand. ...


4

There is no standard practice for TV pilots (failed or otherwise), as their possessors will have different intentions. Some, but not all, successful pilots are deployed as the maiden episode of a TV series, with the rest of the show built off the back of it; others require recasting, and the pilot itself is buried or re-shot for consistency. Failed pilots, ...


4

Anthony Stewart Head, famous for playing Giles on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, plays the character of Stephen Caudwell on Free Agents, the foul-mouthed head of the advertising agency. Two years later, the show was remade in the US with Hank Azaria and Kathryn Hahn instead of Stephen Mangan and Sharon Horgan, and some other changes to characters and plotlines, ...


4

As has been pointed out, "order" is simply being used to indicate the channel has requested or plans to make the series being referenced. "Fox has ordered a full season of Gotham after test audiences provide glowing feedback for the first episode." Basically, this is indicating that Fox only produced at least the pilot episode and maybe a few others, ...


4

Theory 1: Trade mark ownership for future profits. Maybe they are owners of the trade mark and wish to have the option to use it for something in the future? Trade marks need to be established, one way is to use them in the marketplace so maybe buying it and owning it is marketplace activity? I am not a lawyer, but look at this case to see that trade mark ...


4

I think an interesting example in this regard might be Baywatch Nights, which was basically a detective crime show, with Mitch Buchannon opening a private investigation agency. I would call this quite a contrast to the rather soap-opera-like lifeguard drama of the original Baywatch this was a spin-off to. And if this wasn't enough, the whole concept of ...


3

I found this... Question: 1) In a publication, what is the difference between saying “based on a true story” versus “inspired by a true story” and are there legal implications that could arise from either choice of words? (For our purposes, the “true story” language is going to be used in a Children’s Picture book about an animal. The book is about a ...


3

"The Flintstones", a show which co-creator William Hanna admitted was influenced by the Jackie Gleason vehicle "The Honeymooners", ran in its original form for 6 seasons in Primetime from 1960 to 1966. The show so closely resembled "The Honeymooners" that Jackie Gleason once threatened to sue the studio, and then later retracted because he did not want to ...


3

Syndication is quite simply the process of renting an existing (already filmed) TV show to a network and it typically falls into one of two categories: An existing show which has reached a number of episodes, usually 100, is rented to other channels who can then air reruns of it. This is sometimes called Off-network syndication and examples would include ...


3

As early as 1974 on the ABC network, there was a show called Get Christy Love!, with Teresa Graves as the lead. The Wikipedia article sources Jet, a magazine devoted to African American performers and artists, and her profile in the Nov 1974 issue names no preceding black television lead actress, which it probably would have. UPDATE2: section on Julia and ...


3

This thread gives some examples, including the following: Lou Grant was a drama that spun off from the sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show (this was already mentioned in an answer by Walt) The Perry Mason radio show was a soap opera/drama that spawned two TV series. The Edge of Night came first and was a soap opera/drama. A year later came Perry Mason, ...


2

Most scripted television shows will give you a caricatured view of British culture, but they could help to start you off. I would recommend a mix of genres so you get a broad idea of what people like and how the media represents British culture in different scenarios. I haven't included the more absurdist comedies because I don't think they would be useful ...


2

IMDb Advanced usage In addition to the Keywords mentioned in the main index answer, there are several more advanced ways to locate similar films and TV shows on IMDb which are hidden away in menus: User Lists On IMDb, users can create lists of titles which appear on IMDb, then apply tags to their list to help you find them. Advanced Search The new ...


2

I think it shifted about the time PrimeTime Soaps began to wane. I recall several episodic shows when I was young. Virtually all the Adventure and Crime Dramas of the '80s were episodic in nature. From a writer's point of view, it may have been an attempt to keep the shows accessible to a new writer or a fill-in script. Actor contracts, also, went by ...


2

None Bear Grylls shows are "real" in the sense that they depict actual events. They are staged documentaries which demonstrate Grylls performing tasks which: Never fail Allow him to find and obtain all of the necessary components for his bushcraft demonstrations Don't show Grylls being injured or becoming serious ill from being in a remote location Use ...



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