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44

According to The Tommy Westphall Universe Hypothesis, nearly all of American television takes place in the mind of an autistic child. The theory first appeared in 2002, when writer Dwayne McDuffie wrote Six Degrees of St. Elsewhere for the Slush Factory. For those of you don’t know, St. Elsewhere was a slick, well written and acted drama series about ...


30

My guess: people like me often visit domains in movies/TV shows/books just for fun. If I see the domain is unregistered, I can register it myself and draw traffic from nerds like myself. Basically, I'm letting Sony advertise for me. I can even imply movie affiliation and do terrible things: "Welcome to Sony's secret site! You have cleverly spotted the ...


20

Just a theory, but being able to buy a domain this way is a pretty clear indication that a legitimate company cannot come after the film company to sue for being libelled or defamed for a less than perfect company portrayal. If currently unused, it is an indication there is not a naming conflict to a company that is not well known. The fact that you noticed ...


16

Detective John Munch, played by the same actor, Richard Belzer, has appeared in at least a single episode of the following distinct television series, though in some cases, multiple episodes: "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" "30 Rock" "The Wire" "Arrested Development" "Law & Order: Trial by Jury" "The Beat" "Law & Order" "Homicide: Life on ...


14

It's quite a rare occurrence, with two major exceptions: comedies and factual programmes. Comedy remakes: Red Dwarf which was remade in the USA (one pilot episode) with Robert Llewellyn as Kryten in both versions, and he was also joined by the original series writers, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. The IT Crowd also suffered a US pilot in which Richard Ayoade ...


9

Two reasons: So that the film company doesn't lose out on a potential profit if someone buys a domain name associated with a movie/TV show and sells it. Apparently there's a small culture out there to purchase domain names related to a recently-announced movie/TV show, as when the movie company finds out its already registered most of the time they'll pay ...


7

I think it has to do with how technology has changed since then. During that time, we could only 'time-shift' TV shows with: VCRs (notoriously hard to program) Betamax (while it lasted) Now we have: DVRs (TiVo, from your TV service provider, etc) Internet/Digital video services (Netflix, Hulu, network websites) DVDs and Blu rays. Video On-demand. ...


7

TV has become, in the opinion of many Directors/Actors, the most creatively fertile ground. In the last few years we have seen an exodus of talent from Hollywood, and those who have left have been so provoked by the current climate of film making they have felt the need to not only abandon the Hollywood system, but make public declarations as to their ...


6

In the UK there is something called "The Watershed" this rule applies to all broadcasters within the UK and is usually considered to be the hours between 9pm and 5:30am. This doesn't mean that straight after 9pm you can switch from family friendly to more adult material - the strongest material should be shown later in the evening. Programs shown before ...


5

Anthony Stewart Head, famous for playing Giles on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, plays the character of Stephen Caudwell on Free Agents, the foul-mouthed head of the advertising agency. Two years later, the show was remade in the US with Hank Azaria and Kathryn Hahn instead of Stephen Mangan and Sharon Horgan, and some other changes to characters and plotlines, ...


5

As has been pointed out, "order" is simply being used to indicate the channel has requested or plans to make the series being referenced. "Fox has ordered a full season of Gotham after test audiences provide glowing feedback for the first episode." Basically, this is indicating that Fox only produced at least the pilot episode and maybe a few others, ...


5

This is a really interesting question. I've tried to find some sort of list of "banned" television shows, but I came up completely empty. You are of course right that many directors and producers have complained about movies being damaged by content ratings, but not television shows. I did find some possible reasons why though. To begin, it's worth ...


5

There can be many reasons for a mid-season finale: The holidays. Most mid-season finales occur between Thanksgiving and January/February, sometimes as late as March. Lots of people get preoccupied with the holidays, especially holiday TV specials and programming, so stations put their key shows on hold so they don't lose ratings numbers. This is ...


4

IMDb Advanced usage In addition to the Keywords mentioned in the main index answer, there are several more advanced ways to locate similar films and TV shows on IMDb which are hidden away in menus: User Lists On IMDb, users can create lists of titles which appear on IMDb, then apply tags to their list to help you find them. Advanced Search The new ...


4

I think Andrew Martin's answer provides the main reason why this never happens: Shows usually get censored by the network, not by TV content rating standards. So showrunners will obviously blame the network if anyone. This happens a lot, Family Guy for example, which often pushes the boundaries, regularly makes jokes within the episodes about their network ...


4

There is no standard practice for TV pilots (failed or otherwise), as their possessors will have different intentions. Some, but not all, successful pilots are deployed as the maiden episode of a TV series, with the rest of the show built off the back of it; others require recasting, and the pilot itself is buried or re-shot for consistency. Failed pilots, ...


4

Syndication is quite simply the process of renting an existing (already filmed) TV show to a network and it typically falls into one of two categories: An existing show which has reached a number of episodes, usually 100, is rented to other channels who can then air reruns of it. This is sometimes called Off-network syndication and examples would include ...


4

Theory 1: Trade mark ownership for future profits. Maybe they are owners of the trade mark and wish to have the option to use it for something in the future? Trade marks need to be established, one way is to use them in the marketplace so maybe buying it and owning it is marketplace activity? I am not a lawyer, but look at this case to see that trade mark ...


4

I think an interesting example in this regard might be Baywatch Nights, which was basically a detective crime show, with Mitch Buchannon opening a private investigation agency. I would call this quite a contrast to the rather soap-opera-like lifeguard drama of the original Baywatch this was a spin-off to. And if this wasn't enough, the whole concept of ...


4

It was cancelled because of dwindling ratings and being replaced by another show. The same fate that many great shows (coughFireflycough) shared. From Futoncritic.com: (emphasis mine) "John Doe's" search for the truth is over. A source close to the FOX series has informed us the network will not renew the series for a second season. The producers of the ...


3

This thread gives some examples, including the following: Lou Grant was a drama that spun off from the sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show (this was already mentioned in an answer by Walt) The Perry Mason radio show was a soap opera/drama that spawned two TV series. The Edge of Night came first and was a soap opera/drama. A year later came Perry Mason, ...


3

"The Flintstones", a show which co-creator William Hanna admitted was influenced by the Jackie Gleason vehicle "The Honeymooners", ran in its original form for 6 seasons in Primetime from 1960 to 1966. The show so closely resembled "The Honeymooners" that Jackie Gleason once threatened to sue the studio, and then later retracted because he did not want to ...


3

I found this... Question: 1) In a publication, what is the difference between saying “based on a true story” versus “inspired by a true story” and are there legal implications that could arise from either choice of words? (For our purposes, the “true story” language is going to be used in a Children’s Picture book about an animal. The book is about a ...


3

As early as 1974 on the ABC network, there was a show called Get Christy Love!, with Teresa Graves as the lead. The Wikipedia article sources Jet, a magazine devoted to African American performers and artists, and her profile in the Nov 1974 issue names no preceding black television lead actress, which it probably would have. UPDATE2: section on Julia and ...


3

TL;DR: Many reasons including different time zones around the world, scheduling difficulties, promises to broadcast on one station first, to generate word-of-mouth interest. Long Answer **There are a few reasons for this. Firstly, at this Metro article discusses, British shows are often scheduled at fairly late notice whilst American shows have their ...


3

This is called a recap sequence, as opposed to having a cold open like many TV sitcoms. I would argue there are a few reasons for doing this. Television shows are complicated. They are particularly complicated nowadays. Think of the complexity of shows like Lost, Battlestar Galactica, Fringe - unless a user is completely avid and is watching the episodes on ...


3

It's Compromising Positions, the 4th episode of Season 6. (Searching for wearing contacts in context with Garcia and Criminal Minds did it.) Garcia offers to help them out by taking over J.J.’s former duties. Hotch agrees to this nonsense on a trial basis, though he seems to secretly think it’s a terrible idea. ... In any case, Garcia ...


2

First of all, I have to say that the following is largely based on my own observations and deductions in contrast to elaborate research, and to be seen in addition, if not intertwined, with the reasons presented in the other ansers. I think a big factor is also the question of availability and distribution. As far as I can see, it wasn't until the advent ...


2

It seems to be mostly due to the convenience of the channel or network airing a series with a number of pre-recorded episodes or at least a batch of them. For example, when a network buys or syndicates a series that has, let's say, 10 episodes and start airing the episodes in december, if they air episodes 1 and 2 but the christmas episode of the series is ...


1

They have done this before, actually. Remember the season where Kenny remained dead and they auditioned replacements? This season is notable for being the only one without Kenny as a main character, as he was written off in the previous season. Kenny, however, plays a part in some episodes without appearing and returns at the conclusion of the ...



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