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29

As I remember she said "bozhe moi"(Боже мой) which would be "My God" or better put "Oh My god!" and obviously it is Russian. To hear it pronounced Google translate


12

I thought it was closer to "Боже мой" - an interjection "Oh goodness", "Oh my", or "My God" - but its the same sort of thing. "бог"(bog) would be Russian for God, but I think she definitely says "Боже мой" (bozhe moi). Though essentially they mean the same thing.


9

I'm afraid there is no "single original language". Actors performed using each one their own original language and then the movie was dubbed in the countries as necessary: in Italy, the english and spanish actors, in the U.S. the spanish actors and so on. Not even in the Italian version the lips are always synced so it's the same situation for everyone. You ...


9

TL; DR There is strong evidence that he says something along the lines of: "Thank you, thank you very much". Long answer The script (if we assume it is legit) differs from the scene in some significant points, which seems to indicate that part of that scene was either improvised or rewritten on set. Some differences: Script: WILLIE: (quietly) God, I ...


6

In Poland, my home country, that problem exists too. There are lots of bad translations, the best known example is The Sting which was translated literally to "Żądło", as it is the organ of some insects. The English meaning for "trick" was lost, making no sense in the Polish title. The other example (closer to your question) is Die hard, translated to ...


6

The movie's producers are responsible for each title. There are several considerations: How well they believe a title will attract an audience Whether the title resembles any title ever used before in that region How well the title matches the movie's content based on cultural traditions in that market The title is one of the most important aspects of ...


6

According an unofficial script she said the following: Romanoff: боже мой. (Pronounced Bozhe moĭ - Russian for, 'my God'.)


5

The use of a lamp by Jim in the movie is a change from the book on which it is based. In the book, Jim sees a Japanese launch try to get the attention of American and British vessels. Then he sees the launch communicating with a Japanese gunboat using signal lamps. He thought the Japanese were trying to sell something to the British or the Americans, and he ...


5

"If you do this, my people will make you and your children orphans" Speaking of style, huh :))


5

I'm sitting in front of the movie right now. The only foreign words he says to the locals in this scene are "Istuti" and "Bohoma istuti", which mean "Thank you" and "Thank you very much" respectively in Sinhala. Are those the words you meant? Or maybe there's an extended version I'm unaware of? EDIT: And I think atticae's assumption is correct. As his ...


4

I have a coworker that is Japanese and she said this is what Sofie Fatale said during the phone call "Hi, I'm in the middle of a meeting. Can you call me back a bit later? ...Oh you're with your wife? haha, sure I got it." Also she mentioned that her Japanese sucks The call is here, starts at 1:08 ...


4

It's something like: "If you won't let us go, my people will find you and your children" The rest I couldn't understand because of his accent...


4

What makes people laugh. There are surprisingly many theories about what makes us laugh! The most popular theories fall under the umbrella of “incongruity” and date back to Aristotle, who said that the best way to get a laugh was to set up an expectation and then deliver something “that gives a twist.” Theorists like Immanual Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer, and ...


4

The first film that sprang to mind when you asked this question was Bean (1997). This film, the first based on a popular character created by Richard Curtis and Rowen Atkinson,took approx. $250,000,000 on an $18,000,000 budget. Here are the final stats for the film's box office. Regardless of your feelings toward this type of humor (predominantly ...


3

When looking at IMDb only, there are many hints that it was dubbed. First of all, the list of releases as also mentioned in santu47's answer lists an entry USA 6 August 1999 (limited) (dubbed version) So there seems to have been a dubbed English version, even if that was not the only version released in the US, seeing that the list also has entries ...


3

She says "hai visto e preso l'uomo migliore, non come questo stronzo" It means "You met and hired the best man, not like this asshole" Please note that she's not mothertongue and her pronunciation isn't very clear (she pronunces "migliore" as "migliori" that's plural, actually).


3

Doing some research on the plot summary in Bulbapedia, the only key difference is the opening sequence, showing Mewtwo's interactions with Giovanni. From what I recall, these were actually addressed in the anime only (if it even aired) in America. The other difference I found, though this may just attribute to my memory being fuzzy from not seeing it in a ...


2

That is one of the things wrong about this movie. While that village is supposed to be indian, those were Sri Lankan people and spoke sinhalese; Native language of SL. How do I know? Cuz I'm Sri Lankan as well. And to answer your question Indy says "Thank You, Thank you so much" (Isthoothyi, Bohoma Isthoothyi")


1

Firstly, people in different parts of India speak different languages, so, If a movie is made with reputed cast and crew then the producers are likely to dub the movie in different languages such that people all over India would enjoy watching movie in their native language. Also remember that the movies with high budget are the ones mostly get dubbed in ...


1

Whilst it is no longer 'common' for films to be produced in different languages, as the dawn of the 'sound era' of cinema this was standard practice. The original Dracula is the most notorious version of this: During the day MGM would shoot with Bela Lugosi, then in the evenings the Spanish crew would take over the set and continue filming with Carlos ...


1

"You two will die out in this cold. Come with me and we will eat in the warmth."


1

I just saw the japanese version and it is very different! The biggest difference is that at the beginning there is the story of how Mewtwo grow up, this way you have an understanding of how he reacts this way. Later on many conversations bewtween people are different and you get the story in a different way. When I say many it means 80% of them. I found ...



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