Hot answers tagged

57

It refers to a conversation between Clarice and Hannibal Lecter. In order for Lecter to help with her investigation, he demands she tell him information from her personal life, to satisfy his curiosity. Her story begins with her upbringing in West Virginia with her father. He was later shot. She lived with her mother, but was sent away to live with her ...


41

Edited due to many comments providing advice: Deus Ex Machina doesn't originate from the (rather spectacular) video game Deus Ex. Modern meaning Nowadays, it's a simple phrase that exists in the English language and is defined as such: a character or thing that suddenly enters the story in a novel, play, movie, etc., and solves a problem that had ...


33

Actually, the answer to this is probably found in the words of Rick Grimes himself, in 2015, the episode named Them. [there's a long pause as the storm thunders over them] Rick Grimes: When I was a kid... I asked my grandpa once if he ever killed any Germans in the war. He wouldn't answer. He said that was grown-up stuff. So... so I asked if the ...


32

It is from a line from the play Julius Caesar, by Shakespeare: Cassius: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Julius Caesar (I, ii, 140-141) To quote from the eNotes interpretation of the play: ...Cassius continues by reminding Brutus that Caesar is just a man, not a god, and that they ...


26

A Song of Ice and Fire really sounds quite fantasy-ish, whereas Game of Thrones sounds medieval and more suitable for a show. Also, the name 'Game of Thrones' gives more information about what will happen in the TV series (politics and fight for the throne) than the name A song of ice and fire does. Game of Thrones is still a very suitable title, yes it is ...


26

The title comes from the very last line of the book. As Andrew Martin states, early in the book, Starling and Lecter have a conversation about her having nightmares with screaming lambs and that she thinks the nightmares will stop if she can save Catherine The book finishes with Clarice Starling having saved Catherine, and true to the conversation, her ...


25

The 4th of July holiday in America is called Independence Day, celebrating the day the Thirteen Colonies made themselves a new nation, free from the British. So from a historical point of view, it's quite logical whilst the national holiday is called Independence Day. However, in the film they twist this a little. Consider the president's rousing speech ...


19

According to this page Slang term for one who snitches to the police, or is an undercover police officer themselves. Origin comes from the great size of rats living in and around reservoirs. Near the end of the movie the survivors come to a dramatic conclusion, one of them is a snitch or a cop. The title is actually a very good title, a reservoir is ...


18

I don't know that the director has ever spoken out directly about why he chose that specific title, other than what you pointed out: they didn't call it Oil! because it wasn't a close-enough adaptation. However, I think the title is not referencing anything you see in the movie itself (at least not much). Rather, it's warning about what's going to happen as ...


18

Jessica Jones is a series revolving around Private Detective Jessica Jones and her agency "Alias Investigations". The series is based on the comic Alias, and the Netflix series was originally titled A.K.A. Jessica Jones. As in 'Alias [Investigations], Also Known As Jessica Jones.' When they pared down the name, the A.K.A. was kept as a nod to that. From ...


13

Now first of all, this notion is likely a primary remnant of the first movie, which was of course called Mad Max. The following movies simply built upon this established character and his world and explored vastly different stories and environments. So to understand this title, the best place is to look at the first Mad Max movie alone, since the others are ...


12

Private is a rank like a general, major, ... A private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to NATO Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). Basically the title means that they are going to save a low ranked soldier named Ryan. EDIT: Quora also offers the answer to your comment: It emphasizes the thrust of the ...


10

Several characters end up where they started out, or end up in a place that reflects their situation from the beginning of the season. Lou: Ed: Mike: Hanzee: The quote cited in the question seems to miss one of the main themes of the season, and the fact that another episode was titled "The Myth of Sisyphus": These characters are doomed to ...


10

As noted in that SFF question, previously the movies didn't either and they were added in later. However, From my quick bit of research, it would seem the choice was mainly stylistic because the original trilogy films didn't use the "Episode" and number in any advertising. That apparently didn't happen until the prequels came along, and it's believed it ...


10

Jurassic Park not Jurassic Zoo because it's meant to be an amusement park. An amusement park has a lot of attractions, rides, merchandise sale etc. like Disney land. Here, instead of clowns and cartoon characters, we have dinosaurs, but we also have a lots of attractions and rides. A lot of these things have been shown in Jurassic Park as well as The Lost ...


9

The relationship between Ex Machina and Deus Ex is that both are based on the same original phrase: Deus ex machina. The phrase had a specific meaning related to plays, however both the artworks in question are using its literal translation: God from the machine. Deus Ex, the video game series, has protagonists who undergo progressive cyborg augmentation. ...


9

Yes. But it's also referring to the zombies. It's an example of dramatic irony of the most classic type that the title refers in a very obvious way to the fact that there is a bunch of dead people literally walking about the place, but in another sense applies to the people who are not (yet) in that state. By issue 24 of the comic the writers got tired of ...


9

It's from the Greek word "Agora", the meaning of which was "gathering place" or "assembly". Many sources discuss and confirm this, but I like Roger Ebert's description the best: [Hypatia's] father Theon (Michael Lonsdale) was the curator of the Library of Alexandria, which had as its mission "collecting all the world's knowledge." Scholars ...


8

Deus ex machina is a very old theatrical plot device, where the characters of gods would be brought on stage to develop the plot. It came to mean any 'outside influence' on the plot structure, which could not have been performed by the characters themselves. Its literal meaning "God from the machine" has been reinterpreted over recent years, as the plot ...


8

The film summary for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice from the sidebar of Googling "Batman v Superman" makes it clear that the plot is Batman/Bruce deciding that Superman is "a bad guy", a criminal. It's been nearly two years since Superman's (Henry Cavill) colossal battle with Zod (Michael Shannon) devastated the city of Metropolis. The loss of life ...


7

It probably comes from the distinction between 'zoos' and 'Safari parks'. Zoos are typically areas with cages in which animals are 'displayed' and the public walk around looking into the cages. So, outside, looking in. 'Safari parks' generally have differing groups of animals in a more natural habit with some freedom to roam and interact. In safari parks, ...


7

You were looking for credible sources. I found one on the wiki page for the episode, a quote from the comic writer, Kirkman. Robert Kirkman stated: [The A refers to] Train Car A. They were put in Train Car A. The wiki doesn't mention it anywhere else, so I would assume Occam's razor, the answer with the fewest assumptions is probably correct. It's just ...


7

Memento is an English word Memento (noun) - something that reminds one of past events; souvenir The ties to the film, what with the tattoos, notes, pictures etc are thus laid bare


6

The word "game" is active where the word "song" is passive. "Game" implies conflict, struggling for position, winners and losers. "Ice and fire" are very evocative images, but they are also indistinct in that they don't really suggest what the song is actually about, except that fire opposes ice. "Thrones" evokes a world of kings and courts. Taken as a ...


6

Yes, it refers to one person, Zachary "Zack" Mayo (played by Gere). As Wikipedia explains: The film's title uses an old expression from the British Royal Navy and subsequently from the U.S. Uniform Code of Military Justice, as being charged with "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman" (from 1860). Matthew Sharpe explains it like this: ...


6

A few articles, such as this one from The Independent claim it is due to the production process: As for the film’s title, Tangerine was chosen after orange became the dominant colour when the saturation was pumped up in post-production. They provide the following quote from the director (Sean Baker) to back this up: “The world [in the movie] is ...


6

I believe you're talking about the movie Trainwreck with Amy Schumer. The name is based off of the phrase "train wreck," which is basically a person that doesn't have their life together, or their life is a disaster.


6

Possible Explanation Batman has generated a strong interest post Nolan's trilogy that grossed a staggering total of $2.460 b in its Box Office run which means an average of $820 m. While Man of Steel even with one of the strongest buzz of the year it released, it made $668 m which is relatively less in terms of what DC characters are used to. The film ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible