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13

These kind of questions come here over and over when we talk about adaptations (books to movies, games to movies, comics to games, etc.) and it's really simple to answer: 1) Because movies aren't the same as books—the same applies to comics, games, manga, anime, etc. etc. Really, keep in mind that maybe the book could be a really incredible ...


10

Judging from this interview between Suzanne Collins and Scholastic, there doesn't seem to be any other meaning in the name of Panem other than the Latin phrase which is why she chose it: In keeping with the classical roots, I send my tributes into an updated version of the Roman gladiator games, which entails a ruthless government forcing people to fight ...


8

Suzanne Collins, the author of the novels, is known to be a huge fan of ancient Roman and Greek mythology. For example, from this interview: Q: Thanks to a cruel futuristic government, 24 children are chosen by lottery to compete in the annual Hunger Games—a fight to the death that’s televised live. How did you come up with that idea? A: It’s ...


6

I don't recall anything in the first book suggesting that the selection process is rigged. There is a suggestion that the theme for the 75th Hunger Games was altered by President Snow as revenge on Katniss though. Children were allowed to receive extra food rations in exchange for entering their name extra times into the Tribute drawing, so it was ...


5

AirieFenix has given a really good answer above, but I would also add that first-person movies very rarely work satisfactorily. A great example would be Lynch's Dune, which sought to pile on as much exposition as possible through the use of copious inner monologues in the form of voice overs. Personally I don't have a problem with the film, but many ...


5

If I recall, as Clove has Katniss pinned and is about to kill her, the two women share some dialog about Rue. Thresh hears this and kills Clove. So, to reword it, Clove gloated about the death of Rue and Thresh overheard and killed her in his anger, but also saved Katniss for his gratitude towards her for taking care of her since he and Rue are both from ...


5

As @Mathew notes, certainly the second book/movie was rigged, inasmuch as the rules were changed so as to ensure that Katniss’ name would be the only name in the girls’ bowl. The Catching Fire trailer confirms as much. As for the first book, though, no, there’s nothing in the book or movie to imply that the selections were rigged. Not that this means that ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think you will be able to get an accurate answer, because of the way the reaping is structured, and the addendums that go with it, plus the unknown quantities. Here are the salient points for the reaping: From age 12 to 18, your formula is 1 + (Age-12). If you are poor and receiving subsidies (tesserae), one extra chance for every ...


4

Your assumption that the population of District 12 is around 4000 is wrong. The population is somewhere close to 9000-10,000 (source wikipedia). And according to the canon, District 5 is the smallest district. So we can safely assume that District 12 is not so little. Moreover, you err in hypothesizing that small populations in the districts cannot feasibly ...


4

I could not find any definite answer, but I guess it should be "The Capitol" where the hunger games were conducted. The reasons being: 1) If the dictator would have run the game in the Districts in front of the people, it might have caused another rebellion. 2) From wikia The arenas were also a popular tourist destination for many Capitol citizens, who ...


3

In addition to overhearing the conversation between Katniss and Clove in the arena, Thresh may have also noticed that Rue had been "shadowing" Katniss during the training sessions. This may lend some credibility to Katniss' story. Also, if I remember both correctly, I think there was slightly more dialogue in the book between Thresh and Katniss during the ...


3

I was thinking maybe the author also intended to incorporate "Pan-Am", as in Pan America, into the name of the country as well, since Panem seems to include all of the former USA, and possibly Canada as well. That reasoning does not make very much sense. As you say, Pan-Am would mean Pan-America, which translates to "The complete/whole America". From ...


2

If it "used" to be called North America, then it's a safe bet that the reference to past-tense means it's a future version of our planet. From my understanding (and this site, and this site), it's set in a post-apocalyptic North America in our own universe.


1

It is more about feelings vs expressions, when it comes to compare movies and tv-shows with written media. Imagine this scenario: Alice and Emma meets. Alice told something to Emma, which makes Emma sad first, then makes her smile. Now, imagine how can you write this down in a book? Expressions are hard to tell in written media so you can display his ...



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