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5

I don't think the whole problem was ever explained and I guess in the end it's really just a plot device, especially considering how often McCoy scanned and treated alien lifeforms without any problems. While I can't name any "precedent", the movie's story is essentially a trope: two parties want to make piece, hardliners sabotage it, inconvenient ...


1

In the old series. James Kirk played many roles. He played a surgically modified human made to look romulan to steal the cloaking device. A drill thrall in the gamesters of triskellion. He played the character called Baroner in the Organian -Klingon conflict. He played a Native American named Kurok after his memory was erased in the control room of asteroid ...


1

The Federation and the Klingon Empire were at war for a long time blasting each other. I imagine both species wouldn't be overly familiar with each physiology enough to save anyone.


3

But I am constant as the northern star,     Julius Caesar Act 3 Scene 1 Page 4 To be or not to be?     Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 The undiscovered country     The Tragedy of Hamlet Prince of Denmark Act 3 Scene 1 Once more unto the breach, dear friends     Henry 5 Act 3 Scene 1 Cry ...


17

It was a Klingon propaganda device. The Klingons apparently appreciated the works of Shakespeare so much that they 'retconned' him to be one of their own poets rather than a human from Earth. From Wikipedia's article on The Klingon Hamlet, sourced to the DVD commentary on the film Star Trek VI: the Undiscovered Country: The film's director Nicholas ...


3

Actually ships have ALWAYS been able to fire phasers at warp speed. Check out the original series episode "The Corbomite Maneuver", which is only the second one ever shown, and you see them firing phasers at warp speed. Same in "Elaan of Troyius", "The Ultimate Computer", and in the Deep Space Nine Episode "Treachery, Faith and the Great River", and Voyager ...



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