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18

Carpenter found he was way too busy with filming The Thing (mostly due to the location shoot but also the post-production) and passed the duties off to someone else. He also stated that he really wanted to work with Morricone as he was a big fan. As for why the soundtrack sounded much like his own, Morricone said he wanted to make it feel like it was a John ...


18

This diagram is based on Edward Tufte's third book called Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative It is the first visually diagam how rock music has evolved over the last 50 years. Original link for image This poster is $36 for an “archival paper” print, but it only goes up to 1978. The contents of the School of Rock blackboard ...


17

The song you are talking about was the theme tune of the TV series Mission: Impossible (1966–1973). It returned to television for two seasons from 1988 to 1990. Original Theme(You Tube). The Mission Impossible movie is based on the TV series. In 1996, the theme was remade by U2 members Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen, Jr. for the soundtrack for the Mission ...


17

From the wikipedia page on Foley Artists. Foley artists look to recreate the realistic ambient sounds that the film portrays. The props and sets of a film do not react the same way acoustically as their real life counterparts. Foley sounds are used to enhance the auditory experience of the movie. Foley can also be used to cover up unwanted sounds ...


14

According to TV Series Finale, there was a stipulation in Tina "Ginger, the movie star" Louise's contract stating that she was to be the last person billed in the opening credits. After Louise's contract was signed, the parts now known as "Mary Ann" and "The Professor" were recast to Dawn Wells and Russell Johnson respectively. This casting change, ...


13

I believe Midnight in Paris (2011) had an overture, if I remember correctly. Update: Yup, confirmed. Wikipedia has a nice list of films containing overtures, including a post-1970 section. I can't imagine that it's completely exhaustive, so I'm sure that there are films with overtures missing from the list. But the short answer to your question is no - The ...


13

The main reason is really cost, plus you can get far better results in a Foley stage. Recording sounds live is very expensive and difficult to get each of the sounds independently so that they can be properly mixed later. Say that you want to record the sounds you describe live where there are footsteps and a door shutting. You would have to record two ...


13

They are similar, since the intro and show music for Breaking Bad has a heavy southwest influence (according to the composer), and the music for Firefly... well, it's made for a western in space so there's going to be that heavy southwest influence as well. However... The Intro to Breaking Bad was written by Dave Porter and doesn't really have a title. ...


12

Here you go: http://rock.co.za/files/thewall.html Complete with a listing of the differences in lyrics. The Wall Movie Wikipedia Page also has a summary of all the major differences. In summary, The Wall movie removed "Hey You" and "The Show Must Go On". An IMDB FAQ page discusses why here. It states: A sequence was actually shot for "Hey You," but ...


11

The movie is an adaptation of Peter Shaffer's play of the same name, which suffers from the same criticism of historical accuracy. I can't find any references to hand, but I imagine that Shaffer was using the historical setting to stage a story of artistic genius and professional rivalry that makes such a good story, and that accuracy was somewhat ...


11

It's not a by-product of the Dolby encoding process, although Dolby does allow greater dynamic range. Sound engineers employ a technique called "dynamic range compression" to reduce the difference between the loudest and softest sounds in a recording. Use of compression is much more pronounced and widespread than it was in the past, which explains your ...


11

Just before the episode ends we see Walt drinking in defeat. His life in meaningless with no friends and no family left. He no longer has a purpose in life and he has called the police and is waiting for them to come and arrest him. Then he sees his former Grey Matter partners on TV and they are belittling his past accomplishments. One of Walt's most ...


9

From How Film Composers Work: The film music composer: Meets with the director and movie producers, when the film has been shot and is being edited, to discuss music needs for the film. Takes part in a spotting session, in which the film composer, director and others watch the movie and decide where each segment of music should start and stop ...


9

There is no hard and fast rule. Sometimes the production will request a song from an artists specifically for the movie. Examples include Celine Dion's My Heart Will Go On for Titanic, and almost every James Bond theme song. Most of the times the production will just license existing songs. Creating a song specifically for a movie can get pretty expensive, ...


9

One of my all-time favorites! Song changes from album (taken from multiple sources, as well as my own notes): "When the Tigers Broke Free" New song, edited into two sections strictly for the film, but would later be released as one continuous song. The song was released as a single in 1982 and was later included on the 2001 compilation Echoes: The Best ...


9

According to TV Tropes, what you're looking for is called diegetic music, or more colloquially Source Music. Switching back and forth in a single scene is simply a "diegetic switch". TVTropes has other terms for various incarnations of this, some of which are probably "official" and others probably invented by the site's community, e.g.: 'Interscene ...


8

As there are no hard and fast rules for the use of music in filmmaking, this question runs the risk of becoming conversational rather than providing a succinct answer. That said, I am in the middle of finalizing the score on my latest short animated film - so I'll share my reasoning for the inclusion of the background music in the hope that it answers your ...


8

I've heard the song before but I've never seen the video until now. Well I recognized Billy Drago right away. I thought that would be a big clue as to whether this was from a movie, or one time episode of something. He seems to be the only actor that can be tracked from the video other than the spliced in footage of Choke Canyon. His IMDB list him as ...


8

It's an original piece written specifically for the show, written by Dave Porter. The title of the song is simply, "Breaking Bad Theme". There are a few CDs available with music from the show, one featuring music written specifically for the show.


7

As a filmmaker, I can provide some insight into this, however there are always going to be exceptions to the rule. In general, a film is scored after editing—a notable exception to this would be the specific use of a particular piece of established music, in which case the editor may well be asked to edit to the beats of that music. For a scored ...


7

The song was created when the film was made, but cut for the initial theatrical release. However, it was added in later for some IMAX and home video releases, mainly due to the song being included in the live Broadway production of The Lion King. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_lion_king#Soundtrack


6

According to this article from Post Magazine, there were no instruments, but there were guitar, bass, and drum vocalizations, plus a beatbox. With the vocalization technique, apparently you are singing through an instrument, so it is still your voice rather than the instrument that is causing the sound (think Peter Frampton and his talk box). Kevin ...


6

The earliest I found is from 1994's Floundering During the Floundering (credits, the cast sings along in a rendition of "Nothing Funny 'Bout Peace, Love and Understanding," as the camera pans through the crowd. This sort of thing is less incongruous with light comedies. There's Something About Mary (1998) is the first non-musical comedy I found ...


6

Yes. You can have a look at this page on IMDB and see by yourself. By the way, the "Search" feature for that song leads to: Hinter Gittern - Der Frauenknast (1997–2010) (Season 13, Episode 6); Ha-Shminiya (2005– ) (Season 3, Episode 24); Energy Hunter (2005); Life, the Universe and Douglas Adams (2005); C.R.A.Z.Y. (2005); Good morning, night (2003); The ...


6

You're thinking of New Line Cinema, but your instinct is spot-on! ;) According to film composer Michael Kamen's wikipedia page, New Line's corresponding theme is the opening segment of a track from Highlander. This information is not annotated, but Kamen remarks in an interview with Soundtrack Magazine in 2000, New Line is a company that I’ve ...


5

These are the lyrics of the team hymn: Beware, Beware, Walk With Care Careful what You Do Or Mumbo Jumbo's Gonna Hoodoo You, Mumbo Jumbo Is Gonna Hoodoo You, Boomlay, Boomlay, Boomlay, Boom! It's a military cadence based on the 1912 Vachel Lindsay's poem "The Congo" (available here).


5

The song is called Duet by Phillip Glass. From interview with director: ‘The piano scene was in the original script, but I could immediately see an opportunity for me. Rather than take a written piece of music from an old master, I wanted to do something entirely new, so I approached Phillip Glass.


4

Paul Leonard-Morgan wrote the film's industrial music score. Leonard-Morgan created music to suit the film's futuristic setting. He experimented with band-based music, but decided it sounded over-produced and too safe. He turned to electronic music and used 1980s-style synthesisers and modern sound modules to create various combinations and ...


4

The slow-mo music was apparently based on a slowed down Justin Bieber song, but I seem to recall slowing songs songs like this was a popular fad a few years ago.



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