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14

It's quite a rare occurrence, with two major exceptions: comedies and factual programmes. Comedy remakes: Red Dwarf which was remade in the USA (one pilot episode) with Robert Llewellyn as Kryten in both versions, and he was also joined by the original series writers, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. The IT Crowd also suffered a US pilot in which Richard Ayoade ...


13

Interestingly Gilliam did not write the screenplay for 12 Monkeys, it is a rare example of a Gilliam movie that he did not start but was brought on-board after the rights had been picked up by the studio and a screenplay had been written by David and Janet Peoples. That said, La jetée is 28 minutes long. I imagine that the writers could not sustain the ...


12

I'm going to have a go at answering all of your questions. Firstly, I believe you have every adaptation listed above, with the exception of the trashy cash-in flick I am Omega, and perhaps, at a stretch, Romero's classic zombie films. As far as I am aware, nobody has attempted an ending that echoes Matheson's original (and cerebral) conclusion to his ...


11

YES Example: The "Odessa Steps sequence" in Battleship Potemkin by Eisenstein. Wikipedia entry lists MANY movies that borrowed, in my opinion the most famous was "The Untouchables". The scene is perhaps the best example of Eisenstein's theory on montage, and many films pay homage to the scene, including Terry Gilliam's Brazil, Francis Ford Coppola's ...


10

Two answers from Newsweek and Language Log When asked why they chose to follow the diction of the book and lack of contractions Ethan Coen said We’ve been told that the language and all that formality is faithful to how people talked in the period. As to whether or not people actually talked like that Mark Liberman of the University of Pennsylvania ...


10

Several of the non-US movies you named are in foreign languages. Although foreign films are often available with English subtitles or voice overs, I'd guess that many people prefer to watch movies where the original dialogue is in their native language. Additionally, the style of foreign movies is different than their Hollywood remakes. I haven't seen the ...


8

The TV show is just copying the disclaimer in the original movie, although the date has been changed to 2006. But, in the case of the movie, the Coen brothers just made that up as a joke: See this link from Snopes.com for more info So I think it's safe to assume that the events in the TV series are fictional as well.


8

After thinking about it and reading the other answers (thank you Lauren and mootinator) I came up with a possible explanation. I don't know if it is correct though. It can be - as often - about money. It makes not much sense for European/Indian/Chinese filmmakers to produce a remake of a Hollywood-movie (at least directly after the original), as everyone ...


6

The usual answer Hollywood offers when they do this sort of thing is that they want the audience to connect to the story. Since they are probably aiming for the largest possible audience (more money!) they will go for (what they perceive to be) the lowest common denominator. Thus Americanizing the story, to almost beyond recognition. They believe that (to ...


6

This BBC News report states that there was actual room for making a big business with an English language film trilogy. Quote: Telling a story of murder, corruption and family secrets, the late author's Millennium Trilogy has sold more than 65 million copies worldwide and spawned a series of Swedish films made in 2009. Although a hit in ...


5

[The following discussion is based upon my understanding of U.S. copyright law. Relevant law in other jurisdictions may differ in important ways.] A film based upon an existing film (or book or play or screenplay) is an example of a derivative work under copyright law. The right to create such a work is a subsidiary right, in this case called the film ...


5

Yes, there are some gadgets in the 1913 Fantomas. From my own memory, they play not a leading part of the story, but they can be found. At youtube you may find a sequence, approx at minute 8 you can see a third arm. At the start, you have a sequence with the actors and there changing look. The 1913 films are available on DVD. ...


5

Films with subtitles don't get as many viewers, especially in the UK and US where we expect everyone else to speak English. People will watch remakes of foreign films, and the studio knows that the film played well in its original market so it's a fairly safe investment. Take Girl With A Dragon Tattoo - the original was good, but not in English. Its a ...


4

Anthony Stewart Head, famous for playing Giles on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, plays the character of Stephen Caudwell on Free Agents, the foul-mouthed head of the advertising agency. Two years later, the show was remade in the US with Hank Azaria and Kathryn Hahn instead of Stephen Mangan and Sharon Horgan, and some other changes to characters and plotlines, ...


4

The question contains the answer, in that only successful foreign films are re-made in the US. They are re-made because the industry knows that if a concept is a hit in one major country, the concept has a good chance of succeeding in the US mass market. American hits can often be exported directly to other countries' mass markets, without having to be ...


3

At least part of the reason has to be that the Hollywood folks want a big opening weekend splash. If an excellent non-US movie has been out for awhile, chances are many of the US people who would want to see the movie have already seen it. I wondered the same thing about ABC remaking Being Erica, a Canadian series into a US version, given that our cultures ...


3

Louis Leterrier was a huge fan of the original film, but, as he put it: I watched the original again. I went to a shop and bought the DVD and the stuff I love was still there. But it’s funny: memory is the best editor. So it was like, Oh, really? This was in it? It’s that simple? He goes on a journey because he fell in love with her? Really? I felt like ...


3

It depends on how you define it, as you can look at something like Hitchock's Psycho, which was remade almost scene for scene and shot for shot, or adaptations of works. You can also limit it by Hollywood, Bollywood, German, etc. The Great Gatsby has been made into a film seven different times in the US, but the overall record holder for a same name film is ...


3

Well they wouldn't necessarily have to believe Carrie had 'Telekinesis' in order to carry out the murders. The purpose of the following investigation would almost certainly be attempting to rule that out, unequivocally. The people who witnessed her most supernatural feats (flying, lifting people off the ground) were mostly murdered in the school hall. ...


1

According to IMDb, Eutamnesia is a real movie. Yes, the resemblances are striking, but from first hand experience : I was writing a comic book before The Invisibles came out in 1994 that hit almost all the same plot points, this proves nothing. I know for a fact Grant did not steal my ideas, but they were very similar nonetheless. (Of course, Grant did a ...


1

My money is on Romeo and Juliet. But without proper in depth research, my money maybe ill-placed. References: Wikipedia list of Romeo and Juliet Films Wikipedia: Romeo and Juliet on Screen ("...may be one of the most-screened plays of all time")


1

The names are re-used for brand recognition, aka marketing, also known as why we're on our third version of "Carrie". The films themselves are the works of the directors, who bring their own vision (and that of their investors) to the specific project. Zack Snyder didn't have to follow any set of rules when he decided to do the remake - often, directors ...


1

If it was a stand-alone, and wasn't judged by subjective viewers comparing it to the original: it's not bad. First-off, the jpeg you're looking for (and answer to #2: 'yes', but less-featured): Unfortunately, #1- no time spent on Mars/lacking-atmosphere- no. For #3, Quatro- yes:


1

It's about dominance and industry. Hollywood is A) an industry, and B) a US propaganda tool. Neither of them works optimally if there is competition. So it's kind of modus operandi for hollywood to take successful pieces of cinema art and hollywoodise them, so that their public keep watching the same old actors, same old crap.



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