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33

I will try to stay away from what Christian has already posted which already is a great answer. I can answer this from a reader's perspective. Sherlock holmes stories by Doyle can be classified into Long stories and short stories. There are only 4 long stories of which 2 of them are already made into episodes two of them which haven't made it into episodes ...


27

Tod Browning's controversial cult horror film Freaks from 1932. The central story is of this conniving trapeze artist Cleopatra, who seduces and marries sideshow midget Hans after learning of his large inheritance. At their wedding reception, the other "freaks" announce that they accept Cleopatra in spite of her being a "normal" outsider; they hold an ...


21

  That's a picture of J. Robert Oppenheimer, one of the fathers of the atomic bomb (Manhattan Project). Notice the left post-it note? It shows a mushroom cloud and the word "BOOM".       [Source]


19

From the Visual Companion to The Cabin in the Woods: Some stuff had to get cut from the monster rampage sequence at the end. The Angry Molesting Tree, which you can glimpse in the elevator in one scene, got much more molest-y in another shot, which might wind up as a DVD extra. Also, one of Goddard's favorite monsters was Kevin, a sweet-looking guy who ...


16

According to the Mask Wikipedia article there were several references in that one "dying" scene. When "shot" at the first scene inside the Coco Bongo, the Mask's consequent "dying" dialogue references several classic literary moments: "Ya...got me partner!" - A good impression of Pat Buttram, a voice highly associated with Western films. "Tell ...


16

The (co-)Creator of Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, once said: We decided he was going to be a smart-aleck rabbit, but casual about it, and his opening line in the very first one was Eh, what's up, Doc? And, gee, it floored [the audience]! They expected the rabbit to scream, or anything but make a casual remark--here's a guy with a gun in his face! It got ...


14

This is a reference to the opening scene of the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey in which an alien monolith appears among a group of ancient apes and imbues them with the beginnings of human intelligence while Thus Spake Zarathustra plays. Here is a clip on YouTube:


14

Anger is most likely referring to the toppings on a "Hawaiian Pizza"... This refers only to the toppings on the pizza, not to any specific type of crust. If you ask just about any pizza shop for "Hawaiian", you'll get a pizza with Canadian bacon (or ham) and pineapple on it. The name is likely from the inclusion of the pineapple, though the Wikipedia ...


13

They are not merely taking the name. Apart from many smaller nods to the originals (like the title) and little allusions to characteristic conversations from the original stories, there are many bigger story elements from the original that can be found in the episode's story, yet often set into a slightly different context or maybe even parodied. So the ...


13

Manichitrathazhu story is influenced from a tragedy that happened in Alummoottil Tharavadu, a famous central Travancore family, in the 19th century. Here heroine suffers from personality disorder and some strange things happen, solves problem with exorcism and psychiatry. Where as in Vertigo, a retired police detective suffering from acrophobia who is hired ...


12

YES Example: The "Odessa Steps sequence" in Battleship Potemkin by Eisenstein. Wikipedia entry lists MANY movies that borrowed, in my opinion the most famous was "The Untouchables". The scene is perhaps the best example of Eisenstein's theory on montage, and many films pay homage to the scene, including Terry Gilliam's Brazil, Francis Ford Coppola's ...


12

The guy holding two lobsters is Woody Allen playing the part of Alvy Singer from Annie Hall. The second guy is Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty from Blade Runner.


12

First of all you seem to have gotten the line wrong. He tells him it tells the time and then later tells him that the alarm is quite loud. I took it as simply as an ironic joke; a reference to the fact that all of Q's gadgets always seem to have some secret trick or tool but that in this case he's simply giving him a watch. The whole scene is filled with ...


12

He's not referencing a specific cartoon, but rather the trope of cartoon missiles or rockets being pointy a lot of the time, characters simply possessing sooty faces after encountering them, and occasionally becoming angels with harps. These happen a lot in cartoons, and the only specific ones mentioned in that conversation are Popeye (by name) and this: ...


10

From everything I can gather about the genesis of this Justice League movie is that it has been a long and arduous project. In 2007, the project was talked about and started slight development in order to start filming before the major writers strike. Due to this, it seems, the film was put on "indefinite hold". Further, they attempted to get some kind of ...


10

During the scene after the end credits, we see Perlman cut his way out of the Kaiju and then exclaim "Where's my Damn Shoe!?" That whole bit where he gets swallowed (by a premature Birthed Kaiju with no teeth) was simple comedy relief scene to show that the character portrayed didn't know everything, but maintains posturing as though he does. I doubt this ...


10

I lifted this directly off the LOTR Wiki, so I didn't have to go transcribe the DVD Extra: Peter Jackson first encountered The Lord of the Rings via Bakshi's film, and some shots in his live-action trilogy appear to have been influenced by it: One such shot features Frodo and the other hobbits hiding from a Black Rider under a big tree ...


10

No, the lines you are mishearing are actually: Juror #5: Look, lawyers aren't infallible, you know. Juror #7: Baltimore, please. Huh? This is referring to near the start where he is asked: Juror #7: You a Yankee fan? Juror #5: No, Baltimore. Juror #7: Baltimore? That's like being hit in the head with a crowbar once a day.


9

I found this article in relation to the link between The Machinist, The Idiot and Crime and Punishment: Firstly the novel The Idiot presents a protagonist in the form of innocent Prince Lev Nikolaievich Myshkin who as a youth was prone to blackouts, his current mental condition is unclear; [...] Myshkin meets his reverse in Rogozhin, who is associated ...


9

So, this article mentions this: "We looked at movies like 'Big' and 'Being There,'" the Favreau says. "(Those were) movies with similar concepts that were played very real and very emotional -- and they were good movies, not just funny movies." To that end, the director (who is most famous for writing and starring in "Swingers") tried to ...


9

I don't know if the references to westerns are quite as direct as you might be expecting. Interviews with Vince Gilligan about the series indicate that he was influenced by many films of many genres, and the western was certainly among them. These are a few examples Tuco Salamanca was named after Tuco Ramirez, the 'Ugly' in The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. ...


9

Fascinating question! According to the Pulp Fiction Movie Reference Guide, this scene is actually a direct homage to the 1946 film The Killers, "an American film noir directed by Robert Siodmak and based in part on the short story of the same name by Ernest Hemingway." The entry for "The Killers" reads: The Killers (1946): The killing of Brett mirrors ...


9

The OED cites 'guv' and it's variants as entering the language in 1852 via Punch magazine. This is when the word 'guv-ner' was popularized. I originally thought Oliver Twist (1948) was the first movie to use the line " 'ello guv-nor ". However I found an earlier movie Convict 99. Here's a link. The morning governors start at 40:11, they end 40:16.


9

The answer plays into itself in two ways: In the film Cast Away, Tom Hanks' character finds a Wilson brand volleyball in the wreckage and, after giving it a face in the bloody palm print he leaves on the ball, he proceeds to treat the ball as his friend during his stay on the island. Given Ollie was a castaway on an island himself, he's simply using this ...


9

I believe the earliest example is the 1945 film "The Lost Weekend". "The film also made famous the "character walking toward the camera as neon signs pass by" camera effect." You can find the relevant scenes in the film here, from 01:05:00 onwards Purely as a matter of interest, There's an entire tropes page devoted to the genre of 'Drunken Montages' ...


8

It is not so much a reference to a single particular movie, but to all the archetypical action movies of that kind, starring a hard-boiled one-man hero (usually a cop) who has a meaty name (like John McLane, Jericho Jackson, Jack Slater) and kills bad-guys while giving cool one-liners. So no, it wasn't refering to an actual movie starring an actual Jack ...


8

In addition to the excellent answers already provided, there essence of the environment created in the new Sherlock series is a modernized, but true to the source mirror of the original. For example, in the original, Sherlock is manic between cases, and addicted to cocaine and opium. In the modern version, he's a manic between cases, addicted to ...


8

The stigma on being Robin is mostly due to his history as a comic book character. He was one of the first kid-friendly side kicks to be introduced, added to the Batman books as a character that young boys could identify with. Many modern readers forget, but Robin's alternate moniker "The Boy Wonder" actually reflects that he started out as a very young (and ...


8

The saying is not a famous quote. Precocious young Lisa is trying to sound smart by using sophisticated words like "doth" and "celestial" in a rhyme. Ever the intelligent overachiever, she's essentially trying to come up with a wisely worded quote of her own. But "hero strong and brave" is actually quite a cheesy, uninspired bit of phrase-making. And the ...


8

lets go through one by one Shephard - The main character in mass effect is not named after firefly but instead named after Alan Shepard who was an American naval officer and aviator, test pilot, flag officer, one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts, and businessman, who in 1961 became the second person and the first American to travel into space. ...



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