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48

Well for the first film and for most of the second, the Bride is on a revenge mission where she is hunting her victims. Her identity would have to be a secret to make sure she doesn't get followed or caught. It could be Tarantino's way of breaking the 4th wall and including us in the element of mystery and disguise that the Bride has to undertake to remain ...


32

From the script: From an interview with Uma Thurman: Why do they bleep your name? That one eludes me. You'll find out her name. You will definitely find out her name, I can tell you right now, but that'd ruin it. From an interview with Vivica A. Fox: What name do you and Uma say when they bleep it out? Beatrix. Her name is ...


16

I found the information from this site which contains the interview given by the animation producer for that shot: One of the most striking sequences in both Kill Bill films is the backstory sequence of Deadly Viper Assassination Squad member O-Ren Ishii. Tarantino collaborated with Production I., the anime studio behind Ghost in the Shell, Blood: ...


15

Tarantino is an odd figure, creating actual Universes for each of his characters that all tie into one another somehow. They are broken up in a few categories including the Realer than Real Universe which include his history-altering pieces like Basterds where these people are supposed to be living in a real world, as in the way Hitler was offed in this ...


14

It's simple, really. What most screenwriters do is to write the entire script in the same language (which, in the case of Hollywood movies, is English) and then when there's a piece of dialog that's supposed to be spoken in some other language, say, French, all you do is to tell the reader this by adding a parenthesis between the character's name and the ...


13

Her name is bleeped because she cannot be named until she deserves to. Throughout the film she has 4 names. In chronological order the first event of the story is the wedding massacre. At this point she is Black Mamba. She is shot in the head by Bill. This is the death of Black Mamba. She wakes up four years later. This is the birth of The Bride. Now The ...


12

Searching around, I found an interesting detail. When Jules and Vincent are going to Brett's apartment, they open the trunk of the car in order to get the guns, and this is what they say: JULES We should have shotguns for this kind of deal. VINCENT How many up there? JULES Three or four. VINCENT Counting ...


11

An explanation based on secrecy from other characters isn't self-consistent or internally consistent. She is hunting people who know who she is and beeping the name for the audience doesn't stop the characters knowing who she is (the name isn't beeped for the characters but for the audience). And the people she is hunting know they are being hunted by her. ...


10

'The Gimp' was already in the basement, he is kept down there. We can infer this from Maynard stating 'The Gimp's sleeping' and Zed suggesting 'Well we better wake him up then'. To answer your second one, I suggest googling what a 'Gimp' is. However, if you don't want to, then I suggest googling 'gimp mask' which should be able to explain it. This is all ...


8

The only canon reference we have is from Vincent. He tells the wolf "the gun went off, I don't know why". It is possible he is lying but there seems to be little reason to do so, he is certainly not scared of the wolf and is not shy about sharing his opinions (eg he tells he partner his plan to wonder around having adventures would make him a bum etc). ...


8

Ah, one of the great movie questions. I'm surprised it hasn't come up here before. This particular Mexican standoff scene has been dissected quite a bit, and the IMDB link provided by @GertArnold gives the consensus: The bullets were supposed to fly thusly: Joe shoots Mr. Orange, Eddie shoots Mr. White, and Mr. White shoots Joe and then Eddie. However, ...


5

Fascinating question! According to the Pulp Fiction Movie Reference Guide, this scene is actually a direct homage to the 1946 film The Killers, "an American film noir directed by Robert Siodmak and based in part on the short story of the same name by Ernest Hemingway." The entry for "The Killers" reads: The Killers (1946): The killing of Brett mirrors ...


4

He could easily have been kidnapped just like the two main characters were. If Butch had not gone back then Wallace probably would have been used as a gimp too. However as Butch's father's friend told him when he was a child "When two men are in a dangerous situation they take on a certain responsibility for each other" (quote might not be accurate) he ...


4

They are almost definitely old friends, apart from the very valid quote given above by Avner Shahar-Kashtan there is also the line: "I ain't threatening you or nothing. You know I respect you" Which would imply a history. But my main reason for thinking that they are old friends is the way they talk to each other. Neither tries to be the alpha male ...


4

There's a line in that dialogue that leads me to suggest that they are, indeed, old friends, or at least acquaintances. Right before the "little differences" speech, they have these lines: VINCENT: if the cops stop you, it's illegal for this to search you. Searching you is a right that the cops in Amsterdam don't have. JULES: That did it, man – I'm ...


3

I'll add my two cents as a short video producer with a film degree. In that sequence, I think there are only 4 shots that actually show Jamie Foxx holding the whip and hitting the guy. The rest of the shots either show Jamie by himself marching forward and flinging the whip around, or show the guy on the ground with a whip landing next to him, or show ...


3

Brown was shot by the police (possibly the officers that Mr. White later fires on). He crashes the car as a result of his soon-to-be-fatal injury. Mr. Orange does not harm Mr. Brown - his shell-shocked behavior after Brown's death is due to the violence that he is witnessing, and not yet any that he has committed. He has, after all, just seen his friend Mr. ...


2

Tarantino once said that he got inspiration for this scene from Tamil language film "Aalavandhan"(2001) starring Kamal Hassan.


1

I thought it was a humorously heavy-handed ploy to evoke Clint Eastwood's "Man with No Name" character in Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Western films.



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