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77

Roger Avary, the co-writer of Pulp Fiction says: Originally the briefcase contained diamonds. But that just seemed too boring and predictable. So it was decided that the contents of the briefcase were never to be seen. This way each audience member would fill in the blank with their own ultimate contents. All you were supposed to know was ...


43

I don't think Tarantino has ever explained, so all you'll find are attempts at an explanation, like this one: But after reading the script several times, I have come to the conclusion that Tarantino, whether he intended it or not, hit upon nonlinearity as the only way he could tell one particular storyline in the script, the tale which comprises ...


34

This is has already been answered and accepted, but I feel the need to answer anyway, because I have a very different point of view. I'll use the same breakdown that phwd uses. See now I'm thinkin', maybe it means you're the evil man. And I'm the righteous man. And Mr. 9 Milimeter here, he's the shepherd protecting my righteous ass in the valley of ...


32

It's never explicitly said in the film, but if we listen closely the apartment scene we can understand Marvin was their informant within that group. Here is the script of the scene. Jules - "We should have shotguns for this kinda deal." Vincent - "How many are up there?" Jules - "Three or four." Vincent - "That's counting our guy?" Jules - "Not sure....


31

The Urban Dictionary defines palooka as "A fighter who isn't any good, or takes a dive." Marsellus had summoned Butch to tell him to throw the upcoming fight. That's when he told him "The night of the fight, you may feel a slight sting. That's pride fucking with you. Fuck pride. Pride only hurts. It never helps." Vincent was showing his disdain for a ...


24

It clearly looks like a continuity error, but if IMDb's Pulp Fiction FAQ page is to be believed: Why is what Yolanda says in the beginning different from what she says at the end? Tarantino has explained that this is not an error, rather, he did this on purpose. When we first examine the scene, we are seeing Ringo and Yolanda's conversation from ...


22

Marsellus was just sodomized by two racist rapists. He's traumatized. Butch stopped that and saved him, instead of leaving him there, when he didn't have to. His anger at the time was towards the rapists. Fighting Butch at that moment would distract from payback against the rapists. He had more important things to do. Keep in mind, he didn't forgive Butch ...


21

Well people try and make tenuous Links between reservoir dogs and pulp fiction, by that I mean people try and see if they hold up as sequels, whether continuity wise they can work. A logical opinion is to say that the diamonds that are stolen in Dogs are what are in the brief case in Fiction. However Harvey Keitel and Quentin Tarantino act as two different ...


21

There are three explanations. See now I'm thinkin', maybe it means you're the evil man. And I'm the righteous man. And Mr. 9 Milimeter here, he's the shepherd protecting my righteous ass in the valley of darkness. The kid is led astray, Jules is on right path and his gun (and the idea of being killed) is the item preventing him from going off his path....


21

Searching around, I found an interesting detail. When Jules and Vincent are going to Brett's apartment, they open the trunk of the car in order to get the guns, and this is what they say: JULES We should have shotguns for this kind of deal. VINCENT How many up there? JULES Three or four. VINCENT Counting ...


19

Just like the briefcase, the purpose of Brett and the other guys isn't really intended to be known. The trope that this matter represents is a Noodle Incident, which is when something from the past is referred to but never explicitly talked about, but we may still see the outcome of that something from the past. We don't really need to know who Brett is or ...


18

Any answer to this question is going to be uncomfortably close to opinion rather than fact, but I will have a go at answering it objectively. Travolta and Willis were - by far - the most well known actors in the movie. Travolta in particular had been around in leading roles since the 70s with major parts in Grease and Saturday Night Fever. However, his more ...


18

'The Gimp' was already in the basement, he is kept down there. We can infer this from Maynard stating 'The Gimp's sleeping' and Zed suggesting 'Well we better wake him up then'. To answer your second one, I suggest googling what a 'Gimp' is. However, if you don't want to, then I suggest googling 'gimp mask' which should be able to explain it. This is all ...


17

I've always assumed (despite Avary's explanation) that it was a clever movie reference to the McGuffins in two previous movies. The most recent being the great Repo Man (Dir Alex Cox, 1984) where a briefcase purported to contain alien remains and which glows mysteriously is a key thread. This, in turn, may have some relationship with the case of ...


15

The movie does not provide an answer to this question. When Vincent Vega asks Mia Wallace what really happened, she says something to the effect of "that's between Marcellus and Tony Rocky Horror," and leaves it at that.


14

By this point in the narrative, Jules had already decided that he was going to change his life - he no longer wanted to be a killer for hire. The affair with the bullets missing him in Marvin's apartment had convinced him that God had a higher purpose for him, and by allowing Ringo to take what he needed, Jules was ensuring that he wouldn't have to kill him ...


14

The average non-drug using viewer wouldn't know the difference between the effect caused by cocaine [and] heroin But they should, because the movie shows you, and that's what this scene is for. The very first scene of the film is Vincent and Jules, and Vincent is talking quite fast and it's mostly just small-talk and banter, but we can easily see he's on ...


14

From Wikipedia :- The film's title refers to the pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels popular during the mid-20th century, known for their graphic violence and punchy dialogue. From Wikipedia page on Pulp magazine:- Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps") are inexpensive fiction magazines published from 1896 through the 1950s. ...


13

I heard the theory that @JosephLynn mentioned about it being Wallace's soul - and relating it to the injury on the back of his neck. The theory only has slim backing - the glow, the band-aid, the combination of the briefcase (666) and the 'miracle' that happens as Vince and Jules come to take the soul back, perhaps rescuing it from the devil. Obviously the ...


13

Pulp Fiction uses a 'non-linear narrative', i.e. its a story where the scenes are not set in chronological/time order. The scene where Vincent appears at the end, is (in real time) before the scene where he is killed. You can also find an excellent commentary on this at the following Tarantino Wiki.


11

If I understand your question(s) correctly, Vincent Vega, played by John Travolta, is probably the closest character to tying all of the events and characters together as most of the events involve him. If you were to take all of the events and re-arrange them so that they were in chronological order then it would be as follows... Vincent and Jules drive ...


11

Ok, so the general feeling about this is that Vincent was in a bad mood and was just having a pop for no real reason. Some way or another he was aware of Butch's deal with MW and decided to mouth off about it to release some of his anger and frustration. But I believe there is an important reason for QT adding this little exchange in, mightily important in ...


11

I think it functions as a symbol in the sub plot about loyalty, friendship and being a 'true man'. He gets it from the Captain with explanations about what the Captain and his father went through, the ordeals and humiliations which were suffered to connect with Butch via this watch. Remember that Captain says that "when two men are in a situation like ...


11

I'll attempt an answer to this question, but I warn you in advance that you're not going to get any single reason. The question isn't really answerable in that way and as such is only open to subjective reasoning. The first thing to note is that the scene was always meant to be in the movie, regardless of John Travolta's casting (as this article shows): ...


11

The only canon reference we have is from Vincent. He tells the wolf "the gun went off, I don't know why". It is possible he is lying but there seems to be little reason to do so, he is certainly not scared of the wolf and is not shy about sharing his opinions (eg he tells he partner his plan to wonder around having adventures would make him a bum etc). ...


11

They are almost definitely old friends, apart from the very valid quote given above by Avner Shahar-Kashtan there is also the line: "I ain't threatening you or nothing. You know I respect you" Which would imply a history. But my main reason for thinking that they are old friends is the way they talk to each other. Neither tries to be the alpha male ...


11

From Quora (bolded is mine): The chronology of the film is structured to prevent audiences from realizing that the end of the film is really the middle and near the middle is really the end. By Jon Mixon [The nonlinear plot] serviced the experience of the film and further engaged the audience...The audience was engaged by jumping back and forth, ...


10

They did not kill Marvin because he was part of Wallace's network and was an informer in the gang. Remember they asked "why didn't you tell us there was a man in the kitchen with a god damn cannon?" or something like that. This shows that they were expecting him to provide this info and logically he was their man (mentioned in the hallway). If they had ...


9

Is the watch really "symbolic"? I think its role is much more direct: the watch is simply the central plot device in the Butch-related parts of the movie. The watch is Butch's prized possession, a token his ancestors went to great lengths to pass on to him -- as Tarantino chose to explain in the movie's very first scene. To Butch, the watch is loaded with ...


9

Wolfe is what is known as a cleaner - someone who cleans up crime scenes for the mob. He is a fixer and facilitator - he knows how to dispose of bodies and how to create alibis. For more information, check out the 'cleaner' page on Wikipedia.



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