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I think I agree with the poster of this question...soap operas have been replacing actors forever, and these new actors, although hard to accept at first, always just 'became' the character after only a short while. Movie franchises do this a lot also, (e.g. Batman, James Bond, among others) to be sure. But you are correct, TV series do not seem to do ...


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No, they didn't. According to IMDB, Wikipedia and other industry sources, the funding for "The Founder" came from two sources; Don Hanfield (through his company The Combine) and matched funding from FilmNation Entertainment, using money from Roadshow Films. None of these funding sources seem to be owned by or affiliated to McDonalds, nor does there appear ...


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The 2008 film Changeling https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Changeling_(film), a semi fictional crime thriller. His first original screenplay, purchased in June 2006. It came out Nationwide October 2008, 2/3rd of a year later than they optimistically predicted.


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It would appear that the comic book was referring to the movie Changeling, which was JMS's first feature film script. The timeline in the comic book blurb was a bit aggressive. According to that Wikipedia article, there was a delay because Ron Howard wanted to direct it himself, but he was busy on other projects. He ultimately decided to step down and let ...


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Actually, a few early films ran at higher rates that 24 fps. The early color process Kinemacolor ran around 48 fps so that it could display red and green frames quickly for the illusion of color. The earliest films were shot at about 16 to 18 fps, because that is all that was required to reproduce motion without much flicker. Comedy producer Mack Sennett ...


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Source GIZMODO : Cinematic frame rates have been getting undercut by the economic interests of the moving-making industry. The earliest silent movies were shot at around 16 to 20 FPS—since that was the bare minimum that actually generated the continuous motion effect—but were also limited by the arm strength of the cameraman, who had to manually ...


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There's an interesting blog at Vanilla Video discussing this and state it is due to the hand-cranked nature of the projectors and cameras: The earliest cameras and projectors needed to be hand-cranked to advance the film through the gate. This lead to varying frame rates. Early silent films had frame rates from 14 – 26 frames per second, which was ...


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I was going to post this as a comment, but Recasting Call: 7 TV Shows That Replaced Big Characters Game of Thrones : Recast Characters List of television programs in which one character was played by multiple actors Also, Rodney's recasting in Iron Man 2 and Bruce Banner's recasting in Avengers. It's likely a case of confirmation bias, as recasting and ...


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usually now they would use Adobe Photoshop & then put it into Autodesk Maya which are both costy programs, there would be alternatives but you could usually find some ways to get them for free.


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Trailers typically come out before a movie is "distribution-ready", but exactly how far along depends on the movie, and how far in advance they want to hype it. For starters, trailers are usually made well in advance of the final product. Keep in mind that the trailers have to go through much of the same post-production work as the film itself. The effects ...


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I would say it's for the viewer. It allows you to see the change and prepare for it. As weird as it is I feel it would be even more strange and less believable if the head was still and just changed in front of you eyes.


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Scripts go missing all the time. There are bunches of them in circulation at any time, color-coded. The color-coding isn't to find thieves, but to make sure everyone's working from the same script. A friend of mine, back in the '70s, paid his way through college by taking old scripts and selling them, which couldn't possibly have been legal—but nobody ...


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Per this reddit AMA with a show contestant, the production team tried to throw contestants off the scent using four main techniques; Getting contestants to fill out visa forms for more countries than will be visited Getting contestants to fill out visa forms that are never even submitted Taking the contestants to countries where visas can be acquired on ...


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The film's producer (Tom Pollock) reports that their agreement with Fox Searchlight Pictures was that they would stick to a budget of approximately $15M. Finally, Fox Searchlight Pictures signed on ― with some conditions. “We had to get the budget down to $15m-something and we had to source half, because that’s how studios operate today,” says ...


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You're probably thinking of props, but I can think of three different categories this applies to. (I cover props last here.) First is actual sets. Hello, Dolly, for example, had an elaborate turn-of-the-century New York City set. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid was set to use that set for its own New York scene, but the studio balked at the last ...


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To the person who posted about Location Managers - Location managers do not deal with the cars or license plates. They permit the location and if needed, hire the officers for road closures etc. They have nothing to do with the cars or the license plates on the cars. The cars are obtained by the Transportation Department of the show. Typically they are ...


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Yes, they have, though the spelling seems inconsistent. Yes. When discussing Supergirl early on, Andrew Kreisberg (a producer on all the Arrowverse shows plus Supergirl) used the phrase, though he hyphenated it: And quite frankly, just making the Arrow-verse, which is what we call Legends, Flash and Arrow work and then making Supergirl work, it's enough ...


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Apparently it was 15 to 16 million according to THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, which states 15.7 million. Half by Montecito and the other half by Fox Searchlight.



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