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the 'average' shooting day is 12 - 14 hours, union or not. It's like any other job, everyone works a 5 day week (usually Monday to Friday) and for most of the crew, except production staff; AD's, PM, Location manager, ALM, P.A.'s who get paid weekly flat salary, you are paid an hourly rate plus overtime, time and half, double time, triple time after 10 hours ...


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Sometimes, people have the same idea at the same time. A few notable times this has happened: Tombstone and Wyatt Earp Antz and Bugs Mission To Mars and Red Planet The Abyss and Deep Star Six and Leviathan 1492: Conquest of Paradise and Christopher Columbus: The Discovery Mirror Mirror and Snow White and the Huntsman Armageddon and Deep Impact Capote and ...


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There's a long page on the Tardis wikia which details many of the changes, and shows how sometimes it is merely a case of the makers discovering something they like: Deep Breath saw the debut of a new title sequence originally designed by Billy Hanshaw, after executive producer Steven Moffat discovered a popular video of the graphic artist's ...


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The Nerdist remarks: The episode opened with a weird time jump. We leapt back to the holidays, landing right after Ravi found out that his zombie cure had failed. The show then glossed over New Year’s and jumped into the present. It was a weird narrative choice, [...] The only real positive to the clunky flashback was seeing an oddball holiday ...


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I guess I didn't use good search terms the first time I researched this. According to this article iZombie's second season was effectively cut by three-episodes mid season. That could be a very good reason to chop two episodes together. The sophomore drama iZombie, from Rob Thomas (Veronica Mars), received an order for six additional episodes, which ...


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Jordan is one of the "associate producers" at Conan, so yes, he is one of Conan's employees, and not an actor. However, I would suspect that a large portion of that on-screen character is a bit worked up between the two. His "normal" job duties, as a producer, would be things like booking guests, ensuring that skits were properly set up, making sure ...


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Before answer your question I need to point it out the work of the American Humane Association (AHA) which started to advise Hollywood movie industry about the behavior of animals and humans, which they been doing since 1939 after the group began protesting the public release of the film Jesse James, because of a scene where a horse was forced to run off the ...


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In the 1950s and 1960s, most sitcoms were filmed in front of a live studio audience. Comedy performers prefer working with an audience so they will know what is funny and what is not. This was probably because radio comedies of the 1930s and 1940s were broadcast and recorded with live audiences. This helped performers ad-lib and pace the comedy. By the ...


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The inclusion of laughing for a sitcom comes from the fact that many of them were originally filmed with a real in-studio audience just like a game or variety show. The show would include the laughter from the real audience. Now shows that want to replicate that style will use quality, well produced laugh tracks rather than rely on a random result from a ...


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The usage of laugh tracks in a TV show dates back to early television and the necessity of shooting a scene multiple times. While the performances of cast and crew could be tailored to fit the scene, the "audience laugh" - the aural cue to the viewer that something funny had happened - couldn't be controlled as easily. Once audiences had seen that scene once ...


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It was based on an amalgamation of real events and incidents, primarily though the filmmakers referenced this one...


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This is generally referred to as a "teaser" and also referred to as a "cold-open" or a "cold opening". Per TV Tropes; Also known as a Cold Opening or "Cold Open." A one to five minute mini-act at the beginning of the show, sometimes before the opening credits, that is used to set up the episode and catch the audience's attention.


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The alternative to hand held booming was traditionally the fisher boom http://www.jlfisher.com/booms/index.asp These are expensive, require significant training and practice, and are restricted to studios. Outdoor locations would allow sand and dirt etc to get in the mechanisms, causing problems. Repairing the mechanics of these tools is also beyond the ...



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