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-1

An example, Swing Kids (1993) As explained in IMDb: Kenneth Branagh is reported to have refused any billing at all rather than be billed above Christian Bale and the other boys who he said were the stars of the film.


2

Sorry to necro this but I had to toss my 2 cents in... I haven't seen Mystic River, so I don't know how big Eli Wallach's role is and I don't recognize Olivia Williams enough to look for her in X-Men: First Class, so I can't speak to these two but, on the topic of Cameos: The Wiki article for "Cameo appearance" pretty much does all of the answering. ...


-2

Sometimes an actor, or actress, really sucks, and the only reason the final performance is any good is because of the director or the editing staff, who get all the credit.


4

The major players would be: the script writer the director the editor But opinions and decisions could come from a wide range of other roles: the actors cinematographer the producers the studio audience (audience tests)


1

there is quite a bit of media out already on how realistic the hacking is in the movie. Poulsen was called in as a consultant early on in the production to improve authenticity. he's written about it himself for wired magazine. try these links Is Blackhat the Greatest Hacking Movie Ever? Hackers Think So / Metz, wired Asked if Mann got anything wrong, ...


1

Counter to many reviews, I'd argue the hacking in this film is highly implausible. For starters, there is very little actual 'hacking' in this film. The 'big hack' that is the pivotal plot point in the film is where (spoiler): Now while this is a plausible 'hack' if you were targeting, say, my mother. I find it incredibly un-realistic that the... I ...


7

Here's a Full Article according to Cyber Security experts, the hacking in the movie is quite realistic. "When “Blackhat,” the cybercrime thriller starring Chris Hemsworth, was screened to a roomful of cybersecurity experts last week, everyone agreed that it was the most accurate depiction of hacking they’d seen in a film, he said. According to ...


5

This is something usually done in post production, usually because something is wrong with the shot that wasn't noticed/couldn't be remedied on location. Often this can be lighting, with a particular persistence of direction needing to be maintained, and can sometimes be in order to crop out a blemish without sacrificing the framing of the shot. The most ...


1

This is a legal gray area, and can vary from country to country, from state to state. Most states recognize that, if the activity is being recorded objectively and without interference/propagation from the 'director', the film-maker is protected under the first amendment: specifically relating to the freedom of the press. As long as the piece is a ...


2

It seems to me there are often movies of the same title in the same year. IMDb keeps track of them with Roman numerals. Like this: Action Figures (2011/I) Action Figures (2011/II)


6

You might be interested in the case of the film The Butler which just came out recently. The film's title was up for a possible rename due to a Motion Picture Association of America claim from Warner Bros., which had inherited from the defunct Lubin Company a now-lost 1916 silent short film with the same name.[9][31] The case was subsequently resolved ...


1

If there is a limit, it's no longer than three months. Two movies titled Nine came out in the second half of 2009. One is an all-CGI animated SF film with "stitchpunks" that look like a grown-up version of Sackboy from the later PS3 game LittleBigPlanet, released in September 2009. The other is an unrelated musical drama directed by Rob Marshall starring ...


12

The answer is, they don't. And I quote: Literary titles – such as book or movie titles – fall in a gray area in U.S. law. For instance, although a book or movie is protected by copyright, its title isn’t. Copyright simply doesn’t cover titles. And even if the title is distinctive, such as The 40-Year-Old Virgin, courts and the Trademark ...


23

According to this article I found (written in 2010) - individual movie titles can not be copyrighted. However, there can be a trademark granted if there is a certain level of recognition of the title to the specific movie. The author of the article cites "Star Wars" or "Citizen Kane". Per the linked article, the MPAA has a Title Registration Bureau which ...


4

No. The movie was always going to be set in North Korea. But originally it was about Kim Jong-Il. In a New York Times interview dated 12/16/2014, Seth Rogen said: The idea was around for a long time. The first script was about Kim Jong-il [Mr. Kim’s father] The threats and hack happened after the movie was finished (so there would be no reason to ...


2

It seems to be mostly due to the convenience of the channel or network airing a series with a number of pre-recorded episodes or at least a batch of them. For example, when a network buys or syndicates a series that has, let's say, 10 episodes and start airing the episodes in december, if they air episodes 1 and 2 but the christmas episode of the series is ...


2

They are actors who are also miners. One of the miners, Fred Hurt, released a nice incendiary FB post after a dispute over money in Season 4: Why we are not on “Gold Rush” this fall……..this may be news to many…… I am not rich…..I am a working class guy like most of you. After spending more for four years straight than I made, there was no way ...


4

According to TVTropes, it's a Regional Riff- or more specifically, an Egyptian riff. Here we're exploring Regional Riffs — and the musical instruments that seem inexorably linked as cues to locations. This is sort of the audio equivalent of the Foreign-Looking Font — a certain musical style is used because it resembles the actual music native to ...



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