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31

The usage of laugh tracks in a TV show dates back to early television and the necessity of shooting a scene multiple times. While the performances of cast and crew could be tailored to fit the scene, the "audience laugh" - the aural cue to the viewer that something funny had happened - couldn't be controlled as easily. Once audiences had seen that scene once ...


27

It's because of scheduling. When you have two leads who are also featuring in major films like The Hobbit... (together!) and Star Trek plus having writers and producers who are involved in a variety of projects, it's difficult to get everyone in the same place at the same time to make a show... particularly if you want to maintain the quality of the show at ...


25

This one is actually surprisingly hard to answer, mainly because the show actually had four different grades of cars that were used in production; "Hero cars", "Stunt cars", "Jump cars" and "Shells". Stunt / Jump cars According to the book "Knight Rider Legacy" (referenced here in '15 facts you might not know about Knight Rider'), the show went through an ...


19

So, I actually work in casting... There are honestly a couple ways to do this sort of thing and I'm going to take your example as a hypothetical because, let's be honest, you're probably not actually going to be casting Julia Roberts and/or Jonah Hill. No offense meant... just being realistic. Split the Difference You want someone to play both 30 and 50? ...


18

Summary: Delay between original trilogy and prequel trilogy Lucas' marriage ending resulting in a potential lack of finances, a possible lack of interest in producing sequels, inability of technology of era to reflect what Lucas wanted to achieve. Delay between prequel trilogy and new/sequel trilogy Lucas not wanting to pursue sequels, Lucas selling ...


17

Because, as per Obi-Wan, that is what Anakin looked like when he died. Obi-Wan makes sure to create a distinction between the Jedi Anakin Skywalker and the Sith Darth Vader, going so far as the claim that Darth Vader killed Anakin. In reality, we know that but the creation of this distinction answers your question - Anakin died when he was killed by ...


16

The inclusion of laughing for a sitcom comes from the fact that many of them were originally filmed with a real in-studio audience just like a game or variety show. The show would include the laughter from the real audience. Now shows that want to replicate that style will use quality, well produced laugh tracks rather than rely on a random result from a ...


15

Original Answer: I'd imagine there are a lot more things that need to be done to complete a modern movie. In the 1920's you didn't have to deal with lawyers to fight for rights to use different intellectual properties. Deal with executives who want to change the view of a director. Deal with expensive and tough to work with actors. Not to mention the amount ...


15

If you can afford a timecode slate setup, no, it's not necessary, though the action of clapping the slate can serve a couple of purposes: It is a small signal to the editor (well... usually his intern, anyway) that there is audio to look for. On MOS takes (takes without sound), the slate is not clapped (because there's no sound) there's also usually ...


12

Many shots where there is no specific dialogue will be shot "MOS" - without sound running. MOS is a standard filmmaking jargon abbreviation, used in production reports to indicate an associated film segment has no synchronous audio track. It stands for "motor only sync" or "motor only shot". Omitting sound recording from a particular shot can save ...


12

According to a very recent (2 days old) Guardian article: Game of Thrones costs HBO something in the region of $6m an episode to produce. And plenty of sources confirm it. A Yahoo TV article adds: some episodes of "Game of Thrones" actually have cracked that obscene average budget of $6 million per. That Battle of Blackwater episode? Where the Imp ...


12

The old Cut Phone Lines trope has been replaced with the Cell Phones Are Useless trope. It really requires no more thought than any Cut Phone Lines, you just have to have cut the power (to avoid being able to recharge) and have the cell phone battery die. This isn't difficult to imagine; I still have an iPhone4 and that battery barely lasts 10 hours with ...


11

It all depends on the money, talent, and licensing control. Production contracts can be very complicated as there can be many players: the creators, producers, production companies, networks, writers, actors, etc. Here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia article on the TV series Damages: Due to the low ratings and high costs, it was speculated early that ...


11

To answer your questions, I'm going to use this site, Jeopardy-FAQs.com, which is an unaffiliated Jeopardy! site that seems to have some specific knowledge of how the show is taped... perhaps someone who worked on the show. They shoot an entire week of show in one day, so five episodes per day, and they apparently shoot two weeks-worth of episodes in each ...


9

According to this patent application by Oscar winning microphone specialist Les Drever (whose award was for "technical achievement in the field of microphone windscreen and isolation mount design"), the thinking behind the hand-held boom (AKA 'the fishpole') is largely one of convenience and cost... A hand-held or fishpole boom is physically held and ...


9

Ad people know how to push our buttons. Psychological analysis on the impact of color shows that people (i.e. consumers) associate blue with concepts such as credibility, being business-like, professionalism, and trust. IBM was proud to be called "Big Blue." Facebook isn't blue by chance. Blue is also associated with honesty. All of these are good ...


8

I'm guessing that movie has an odd aspect ratio, but when mastering it for DVD or BD it needs to fit inside either 4:3 or 16:9. Are you certain your screenshot is the actual picture? Because to me it looks like the actual picture is 16:9 with black bars on the side, and the black bars at the top and bottom are added by your player, hence the windowboxing ...


8

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism… When filming, picture is everything, sound is the 'red-haired step-child' [poor PC-awareness aside] The Director and DOP [Director of Photography] will spend as much time as time/budget allows getting the shot right, as regards lighting, angle, lens… heck even getting the actors to ...


8

In the 1950s and 1960s, most sitcoms were filmed in front of a live studio audience. Comedy performers prefer working with an audience so they will know what is funny and what is not. This was probably because radio comedies of the 1930s and 1940s were broadcast and recorded with live audiences. This helped performers ad-lib and pace the comedy. By the ...


7

Director Joss Whedon has said that they tried to come up with something to top the Avengers post-credit shawarma scene, but they just couldn't come up with anything that they thought was better. We all came at it separately—we don’t want to chase that. That was a jewel and a weird little quirk. It didn’t seem to lend itself in the same way, and we ...


7

General crowd releases can be used, particularly when you don't need to control the crowd. These are common in general exterior shots and when shooting reality TV. But, in your example, this is very unlikely because you don't want the people recognizing your talent and messing up the shot. If the principal talent is in the scene, you can pretty much bet ...


7

There are actually incentives for filming in the city of Pittsburgh that have nothing to do with being a sports fan. Dawn Keezer, Pittsburgh Film Office Director states that Hollywood is enticed into filming in the city because of the $75 million tax incentive program that was introduced in 2004. However, she is quick to point out that a tax incentive was ...


7

According to Nina Jacobson, the producer, in this answer on Quora: Practically, Phil had shot about 80% of his scenes. What we had to do with the remaining 20% was to give two key scenes to Liz Banks and Woody Harrelson. In MJ1, Effie gives Katniss Cinna's design for the mockingly uniform instead of Plutarch, as was originally scripted. In MJ2, ...


6

TV Stations are constantly updating their 'revenue map' - this is how much money they make at certain times on certain days - it's really just an annual calendar, it has to be annual to take into account seasonal variations (viewing drops in the summer) and special events (Christmas, easter etc.). These figures are actually very easy to compile because ...


6

No, evidence shows that the movie was made in a documentary type of way, but the studio tried to cover itself with releases. Lawsuits filed against the movie, actor, and studio failed, as there was no evidence that the people were manipulated. There was no statements in the lawsuits by either party that the scenes were scripted. Other individuals ...


5

The closest similarity between film and digital resolution is the comparison of film grain to pixel resolution. Digital photography does not exhibit film grain, since there is no film for any grain to exist within. In digital cameras, the closest physical equivalents of film grains are the individual elements of the image sensor (e.g. CCD cell), the ...


5

This can happen for any number of reasons: the actor has a reason to be away (not necessarily an emergency) so they have less scenes. Sometimes they can prerecord some sub-plot scenes in advance so that the character doesn't mysteriously disappear for many episodes in a row the actor has a reason to want a lower workload for a little while (learning lines ...


5

Yes, Any network could change their decision and cancel a show after renewing it or (more likely) order a small number of episodes. For example The Brink starring Jack Black. HBO renewed the show for season 2 then reversed the decision From this HBO Cancels The Brink The network has reversed its Season 2 renewal HBO has cancelled The Brink ...


5

This is generally referred to as a "teaser" and also referred to as a "cold-open" or a "cold opening". Per TV Tropes; Also known as a Cold Opening or "Cold Open." A one to five minute mini-act at the beginning of the show, sometimes before the opening credits, that is used to set up the episode and catch the audience's attention.



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