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32

Recycling effects is a very common tactic in post-production. Once you have an effect that works great, it's simply cheaper and faster to reuse it than to reinvent the wheel over and over again, especially when 99% of the viewers won't notice it. You are one of the few people who noticed that this particular sound was recycled, but there are hundreds of ...


30

Christopher Nolan is, quite famously, aghast with 3D; which he perceives to be an industry forced as opposed to audience led technology... basically, its only around as a way for the film industry to make more money. Nolan is a great advocate of Film, and a great critic of the machinations of the film industry that are pushing for 3-D: "The question of ...


30

Christopher Nolan has repeatedly expressed his dislike for 3D based on various reasons: For example in an interview about Inception he expressed that while interesting, 3D isn't too relevant for a movie's effect: DEADLINE: Why didn’t you shoot in 3D which studios like Warner Bros have made a priority? NOLAN: We looked at shooting Inception in 3D and ...


24

According to this article I found (written in 2010) - individual movie titles can not be copyrighted. However, there can be a trademark granted if there is a certain level of recognition of the title to the specific movie. The author of the article cites "Star Wars" or "Citizen Kane". Per the linked article, the MPAA has a Title Registration Bureau which ...


18

So, I actually work in casting... There are honestly a couple ways to do this sort of thing and I'm going to take your example as a hypothetical because, let's be honest, you're probably not actually going to be casting Julia Roberts and/or Jonah Hill. No offense meant... just being realistic. Split the Difference You want someone to play both 30 and 50? ...


17

The question focuses closely on the activities of the director that occur when on set shooting the movie, but this is actually quite a small part of the overall activities of making a movie. The overall process might be years long, with only a few weeks or months shooting 'film'. To quote from the first few lines of wikipedia's definition of Film Director: ...


17

For deaths, the footage is never used as it would be extremely distasteful, as well as evidence in any investigations or lawsuits into the accidental death. An example of this would be Brandon Lee, the son of Bruce Lee, who was accidentally shot and killed on the set of The Crow, as detailed on Wikipedia: In the fatal scene, which called for the ...


15

In regards to the cat in Alien, 32 Things We Learned From the ‘Alien’ Commentary Director Ridley Scott got the hissing reaction from Jones the Cat by flashing a German Shepherd into the cat’s sight This is also mentioned on IMDb, To get Jones the cat to react fearfully to the descending Alien, a German Shepherd was placed in front of him with a ...


15

This is just an addendum to the other answers. This particular audio clips is part of the Premiere Edition Vol.1 (released in 1990)   from the company Hollywood Edge, which provides high end, professional, and royalty free special effects and music for all media use It's a 2 min track that features: Police Radio; Calls Received Through ...


12

Is every appearance of a product in a movie sponsored? No. Free promotion for undisclosed reasons You'll see plenty of movies where characters use Apple products, however Apple have claimed (via the Washington Post) that they aren't paying for it: Apple said it does not pay for product placement and would not discuss how its products make their ...


12

Well, without narrowing it down slightly, this is an extremely broad topic as there is no specification as to what type of actors, locations, etc. I will address this from the point of view of SAG-AFTRA, the Screen Actors Guild union in the United States. For example, SAG-AFTRA has rate sheets available on their website that spell out the hourly rate for ...


12

The answer is, they don't. And I quote: Literary titles – such as book or movie titles – fall in a gray area in U.S. law. For instance, although a book or movie is protected by copyright, its title isn’t. Copyright simply doesn’t cover titles. And even if the title is distinctive, such as The 40-Year-Old Virgin, courts and the Trademark ...


12

The old Cut Phone Lines trope has been replaced with the Cell Phones Are Useless trope. It really requires no more thought than any Cut Phone Lines, you just have to have cut the power (to avoid being able to recharge) and have the cell phone battery die. This isn't difficult to imagine; I still have an iPhone4 and that battery barely lasts 10 hours with ...


11

TL;DR While there certainly are some instances of title changes for a new season, it is uncommon for the simple reason that most of the time a title change only makes sense from an artistic point of view, but not from a marketing one, where it can even bear considerable risks. Because the final decision often lies with the network, requests for title ...


10

The producer is effectively the person (or persons) that create the film, and are typically the only people who stay on the project from inception to release. There can often be a hierarchy of producers, many of whom are accredited with production in order to guarantee their complicity and money (executive producers are typically of this category) whilst ...


10

Wikipedia has a page to denote such types of filming accidents, and most of the films I see there are prominent enough to have been released in spite of the accident and/or death. The most prominent 80s film I find is Rocky IV, where Dolph Lundgren punched Stallone so hard he entered the hospital for 8 days. The movie obviously continued the Rocky series, ...


10

This is something usually done in post production, usually because something is wrong with the shot that wasn't noticed/couldn't be remedied on location. Often this can be lighting, with a particular persistence of direction needing to be maintained, and can sometimes be in order to crop out a blemish without sacrificing the framing of the shot. The most ...


10

Here's a Full Article according to Cyber Security experts, the hacking in the movie is quite realistic. "When “Blackhat,” the cybercrime thriller starring Chris Hemsworth, was screened to a roomful of cybersecurity experts last week, everyone agreed that it was the most accurate depiction of hacking they’d seen in a film, he said. According to ...


9

In the US meal breaks for actors are regulated by the Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Actors (SAG/AFTRA) and are usually provided by the Craft Services Department. According to the Union rules found here The performer must be given the first meal break within six hours from the time of first call. The provisions for ...


9

Often on shooting sets a table with food and snacks will be provided at all times. It's called a craft service, and it's there to provide nourishment not only for the actors but to all the filming crew. It gives the crew quick access to food and drink so that they don't need to leave the set if they get hungry. Here's a nice article on the subject.


9

I think the most extraordinary instance of a production completing despite the death of an actor is The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2008). During a break in principal photography, actor Heath Ledger died of an accidental overdose. Director Terry Gilliam suspended production temporarily, but finished the film with a solution that was, in my opinion, ...


8

It's usually too dangerous and/or expensive to use any real money in films, especially if its getting thrown around where people could steal it or it could be damaged or destroyed. The stage money you see in films and TV looks real, but only from the particular way its being filmed. Real money isn't actually printed on paper, it's usually cotton and it's ...


8

Impossible to prove: but almost definitely. There is actually a precedent for this in cinema, known as 'The Castle Rock Rule'... despite the well circulated platitude that "No one sets out to make a bad Movie", Castle Rock Entertainment supposedly circulated a theory amongst their development squad that this was not actually the case. Supposedly, there are ...


8

Because it is fiction; entertainment, first and foremost. It's not intended to be a scientifically accurate treatise on exactly how it would be like in a post apocalyptic world short on people. Folks would be milling around all day gathering roots, scratching themselves, and wondering where to walk to next. Not exactly great entertainment. How the various ...


7

I think your question is primarily opinion based, it'll be hard to answer without using opinion. But I like it, so here's my .02. Anything with a brain stem can be trained to perform any of their natural behaviors. I'm not sure there's one true answer to you question, because a variety of training methods exist. Clicker training works great, and fast! It's ...


7

Shooting in 3D costs are said to be 2-4 times that of 2D costs. Mind you, that is the costs of shooting the film, not the whole budget. It's mainly because you have twice the amount of data: for every frame you'll have to do everything twice, once for each eye. Furthermore, the whole filming workflow must be updated. You have bigger, more expensive cameras, ...


7

According to a very recent (2 days old) Guardian article: Game of Thrones costs HBO something in the region of $6m an episode to produce. And plenty of sources confirm it. A Yahoo TV article adds: some episodes of "Game of Thrones" actually have cracked that obscene average budget of $6 million per. That Battle of Blackwater episode? Where the Imp ...


6

The buy/rent the fake money from prop shops. This fake money has to pass legal requirements of not duplicating the image exactly among other restrictions (making it easy to spot as non-authentic if inspected closely). If people try to circulate it, the secret service steps in. It has happened before, one example is when they shot the Rush Hour 2 movie.


6

I worked for Ben Affleck's studio LivePlanet (Project Greenlight, The Running Man) for a year. We did have a few sponsorships for each of our shows. In general, we just went to great lengths to exclude any brand references, because in made-for-television content, conflicts with sponsorships can be a problem. For example, if one of our shows happened to ...


6

There are several different types of "grips", each with varying levels of responsibility. The Key Grip is basically the unit head, and reports to the Director of Photography on a feature. They are responsible for scouting the locations, ordering, arranging transport and setup of equipment for filming and lighting. They are sometimes billed as first company ...



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