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32

Christopher Nolan is, quite famously, aghast with 3D; which he perceives to be an industry forced as opposed to audience led technology... basically, its only around as a way for the film industry to make more money. Nolan is a great advocate of Film, and a great critic of the machinations of the film industry that are pushing for 3-D: "The question of ...


31

Christopher Nolan has repeatedly expressed his dislike for 3D based on various reasons: For example in an interview about Inception he expressed that while interesting, 3D isn't too relevant for a movie's effect: DEADLINE: Why didn’t you shoot in 3D which studios like Warner Bros have made a priority? NOLAN: We looked at shooting Inception in 3D and ...


25

According to this article I found (written in 2010) - individual movie titles can not be copyrighted. However, there can be a trademark granted if there is a certain level of recognition of the title to the specific movie. The author of the article cites "Star Wars" or "Citizen Kane". Per the linked article, the MPAA has a Title Registration Bureau which ...


18

For deaths, the footage is never used as it would be extremely distasteful, as well as evidence in any investigations or lawsuits into the accidental death. An example of this would be Brandon Lee, the son of Bruce Lee, who was accidentally shot and killed on the set of The Crow, as detailed on Wikipedia: In the fatal scene, which called for the ...


18

So, I actually work in casting... There are honestly a couple ways to do this sort of thing and I'm going to take your example as a hypothetical because, let's be honest, you're probably not actually going to be casting Julia Roberts and/or Jonah Hill. No offense meant... just being realistic. Split the Difference You want someone to play both 30 and 50? ...


17

The question focuses closely on the activities of the director that occur when on set shooting the movie, but this is actually quite a small part of the overall activities of making a movie. The overall process might be years long, with only a few weeks or months shooting 'film'. To quote from the first few lines of wikipedia's definition of Film Director: ...


15

In regards to the cat in Alien, 32 Things We Learned From the ‘Alien’ Commentary Director Ridley Scott got the hissing reaction from Jones the Cat by flashing a German Shepherd into the cat’s sight This is also mentioned on IMDb, To get Jones the cat to react fearfully to the descending Alien, a German Shepherd was placed in front of him with a ...


13

Is every appearance of a product in a movie sponsored? No. Free promotion for undisclosed reasons You'll see plenty of movies where characters use Apple products, however Apple have claimed (via the Washington Post) that they aren't paying for it: Apple said it does not pay for product placement and would not discuss how its products make their ...


12

This is something usually done in post production, usually because something is wrong with the shot that wasn't noticed/couldn't be remedied on location. Often this can be lighting, with a particular persistence of direction needing to be maintained, and can sometimes be in order to crop out a blemish without sacrificing the framing of the shot. The most ...


12

The answer is, they don't. And I quote: Literary titles – such as book or movie titles – fall in a gray area in U.S. law. For instance, although a book or movie is protected by copyright, its title isn’t. Copyright simply doesn’t cover titles. And even if the title is distinctive, such as The 40-Year-Old Virgin, courts and the Trademark ...


12

The old Cut Phone Lines trope has been replaced with the Cell Phones Are Useless trope. It really requires no more thought than any Cut Phone Lines, you just have to have cut the power (to avoid being able to recharge) and have the cell phone battery die. This isn't difficult to imagine; I still have an iPhone4 and that battery barely lasts 10 hours with ...


12

According to a very recent (2 days old) Guardian article: Game of Thrones costs HBO something in the region of $6m an episode to produce. And plenty of sources confirm it. A Yahoo TV article adds: some episodes of "Game of Thrones" actually have cracked that obscene average budget of $6 million per. That Battle of Blackwater episode? Where the Imp ...


12

Many shots where there is no specific dialogue will be shot "MOS" - without sound running. MOS is a standard filmmaking jargon abbreviation, used in production reports to indicate an associated film segment has no synchronous audio track. It stands for "motor only sync" or "motor only shot". Omitting sound recording from a particular shot can save ...


10

Wikipedia has a page to denote such types of filming accidents, and most of the films I see there are prominent enough to have been released in spite of the accident and/or death. The most prominent 80s film I find is Rocky IV, where Dolph Lundgren punched Stallone so hard he entered the hospital for 8 days. The movie obviously continued the Rocky series, ...


10

I think the most extraordinary instance of a production completing despite the death of an actor is The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2008). During a break in principal photography, actor Heath Ledger died of an accidental overdose. Director Terry Gilliam suspended production temporarily, but finished the film with a solution that was, in my opinion, ...


10

Here's a Full Article according to Cyber Security experts, the hacking in the movie is quite realistic. "When “Blackhat,” the cybercrime thriller starring Chris Hemsworth, was screened to a roomful of cybersecurity experts last week, everyone agreed that it was the most accurate depiction of hacking they’d seen in a film, he said. According to ...


8

It's usually too dangerous and/or expensive to use any real money in films, especially if its getting thrown around where people could steal it or it could be damaged or destroyed. The stage money you see in films and TV looks real, but only from the particular way its being filmed. Real money isn't actually printed on paper, it's usually cotton and it's ...


8

Impossible to prove: but almost definitely. There is actually a precedent for this in cinema, known as 'The Castle Rock Rule'... despite the well circulated platitude that "No one sets out to make a bad Movie", Castle Rock Entertainment supposedly circulated a theory amongst their development squad that this was not actually the case. Supposedly, there are ...


8

Shooting in 3D costs are said to be 2-4 times that of 2D costs. Mind you, that is the costs of shooting the film, not the whole budget. It's mainly because you have twice the amount of data: for every frame you'll have to do everything twice, once for each eye. Furthermore, the whole filming workflow must be updated. You have bigger, more expensive cameras, ...


8

Because it is fiction; entertainment, first and foremost. It's not intended to be a scientifically accurate treatise on exactly how it would be like in a post apocalyptic world short on people. Folks would be milling around all day gathering roots, scratching themselves, and wondering where to walk to next. Not exactly great entertainment. How the various ...


7

I think your question is primarily opinion based, it'll be hard to answer without using opinion. But I like it, so here's my .02. Anything with a brain stem can be trained to perform any of their natural behaviors. I'm not sure there's one true answer to you question, because a variety of training methods exist. Clicker training works great, and fast! It's ...


7

General crowd releases can be used, particularly when you don't need to control the crowd. These are common in general exterior shots and when shooting reality TV. But, in your example, this is very unlikely because you don't want the people recognizing your talent and messing up the shot. If the principal talent is in the scene, you can pretty much bet ...


7

I'm guessing that movie has an odd aspect ratio, but when mastering it for DVD or BD it needs to fit inside either 4:3 or 16:9. Are you certain your screenshot is the actual picture? Because to me it looks like the actual picture is 16:9 with black bars on the side, and the black bars at the top and bottom are added by your player, hence the windowboxing ...


7

Director Joss Whedon has said that they tried to come up with something to top the Avengers post-credit shawarma scene, but they just couldn't come up with anything that they thought was better. We all came at it separately—we don’t want to chase that. That was a jewel and a weird little quirk. It didn’t seem to lend itself in the same way, and we ...


7

It all depends on the money, talent, and licensing control. Production contracts can be very complicated as there can be many players: the creators, producers, production companies, networks, writers, actors, etc. Here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia article on the TV series Damages: Due to the low ratings and high costs, it was speculated early that ...


6

I worked for Ben Affleck's studio LivePlanet (Project Greenlight, The Running Man) for a year. We did have a few sponsorships for each of our shows. In general, we just went to great lengths to exclude any brand references, because in made-for-television content, conflicts with sponsorships can be a problem. For example, if one of our shows happened to ...


6

The buy/rent the fake money from prop shops. This fake money has to pass legal requirements of not duplicating the image exactly among other restrictions (making it easy to spot as non-authentic if inspected closely). If people try to circulate it, the secret service steps in. It has happened before, one example is when they shot the Rush Hour 2 movie.


6

The actor Al Mulock committed suicide by jumping from his hotel room window while filming Once Upon A Time in the West in Spain in 1968. Mulock played one of the three men who meet Charles Bronson's character at the rail station in the famous opening scene. He was still in costume when he jumped from the window, and his fall was witnessed by many of ...


6

The scenes which we see in the movie as night scenes might not be filmed at night. Day for Night is a set of techniques is used to simulate a night scene while filming in daylight. These include tungsten-balanced rather than daylight-balanced film stock or special blue filters, under-exposing the shot (usually in post-production) to create the illusion of ...


6

I have worked in the film distribution industry for the past 15 years and handle box office numbers on a daily basis. There are companies that track the box office ticket sales by cinema, on behalf of the distributors (studios and independents). The market leader right now is Rentrak which serves the majority of the markets around the world, but there are ...



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