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27

There's an interesting blog at Vanilla Video discussing this and state it is due to the hand-cranked nature of the projectors and cameras: The earliest cameras and projectors needed to be hand-cranked to advance the film through the gate. This lead to varying frame rates. Early silent films had frame rates from 14 – 26 frames per second, which was ...


9

Trailers typically come out before a movie is "distribution-ready", but exactly how far along depends on the movie, and how far in advance they want to hype it. For starters, trailers are usually made well in advance of the final product. Keep in mind that the trailers have to go through much of the same post-production work as the film itself. The effects ...


8

You're probably thinking of props, but I can think of three different categories this applies to. (I cover props last here.) First is actual sets. Hello, Dolly, for example, had an elaborate turn-of-the-century New York City set. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid was set to use that set for its own New York scene, but the studio balked at the last ...


5

Per this reddit AMA with a show contestant, the production team tried to throw contestants off the scent using four main techniques; Getting contestants to fill out visa forms for more countries than will be visited Getting contestants to fill out visa forms that are never even submitted Taking the contestants to countries where visas can be acquired on ...


3

It would appear that the comic book was referring to the movie Changeling, which was JMS's first feature film script. The timeline in the comic book blurb was a bit aggressive. According to that Wikipedia article, there was a delay because Ron Howard wanted to direct it himself, but he was busy on other projects. He ultimately decided to step down and let ...


3

To the person who posted about Location Managers - Location managers do not deal with the cars or license plates. They permit the location and if needed, hire the officers for road closures etc. They have nothing to do with the cars or the license plates on the cars. The cars are obtained by the Transportation Department of the show. Typically they are ...


2

Scripts go missing all the time. There are bunches of them in circulation at any time, color-coded. The color-coding isn't to find thieves, but to make sure everyone's working from the same script. A friend of mine, back in the '70s, paid his way through college by taking old scripts and selling them, which couldn't possibly have been legal—but nobody ...


2

Yes, they have, though the spelling seems inconsistent. Yes. When discussing Supergirl early on, Andrew Kreisberg (a producer on all the Arrowverse shows plus Supergirl) used the phrase, though he hyphenated it: And quite frankly, just making the Arrow-verse, which is what we call Legends, Flash and Arrow work and then making Supergirl work, it's enough ...


2

The film's producer (Tom Pollock) reports that their agreement with Fox Searchlight Pictures was that they would stick to a budget of approximately $15M. Finally, Fox Searchlight Pictures signed on ― with some conditions. “We had to get the budget down to $15m-something and we had to source half, because that’s how studios operate today,” says ...


1

Apparently it was 15 to 16 million according to THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, which states 15.7 million. Half by Montecito and the other half by Fox Searchlight.


1

I would say it's for the viewer. It allows you to see the change and prepare for it. As weird as it is I feel it would be even more strange and less believable if the head was still and just changed in front of you eyes.


1

Highly depends on their individual contract or negotiations. SAG rules don't address this. Extras who don't speak for example are not given credits. Including those used as corpses in a autopsy scene. Though, as a counter example of a highly known actor to @sanpaco's answer, Sean Bean, better known as the late Lord Eddard "Ned" Stark received a credit for ...


1

They would most likely not receive a credit in the examples you mention. There are a lot of different reasons someone would or would not receive a credit. Here are a few reasons someone might not receive a credit: Extras or characters without speaking parts An actor requested to remain anonymous A big actor has a cameo appearance Minor characters on tv ...


1

Firstly the assumption about it being tiring actually isn't that accurate. Boom operators with some years of experience can quite happily swing a pole for 5 minutes at a time with a break in between (to reset the shot) all day - lots of it is technique and using the correct muscles and posture in your arms and core and learning how to move between these ...



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