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I expect that if you really think hard enough, you can adapt prisoners to represent just about every character in the film. In terms of physical captivity, Alex, Bob, Joy, Anna, and Keller were all prisoners at some point. But Keller is also prisoner to his pride, ego, and way of life. He is a prisoner of his own self-reliance and suspicion of everybody ...


3

First of all, Bob Taylor was once kidnapped by Mr. and Mrs. Jones, in the same way Alex was (and Anna and Joy for that matter). But Bob achieved to escape before getting killed (Mrs. Jones even mentions completely forgetting about him, until he appeared in the news recently). The reason why he is so deranged in general is just because of the traumatic ...


2

After an exhausting ordeal he's been through and after losing almost all hope, he hears "You were there" from Joy. Moments later he realizes where was the only place where he could've been heard (we see that clearly on his face), and it dawns on him where his daughter is (or at least was). Also, in his mind, Alex is still the guilty one. So, I see his ...


2

Short answer: the trauma. We didn't see much of Anna and Joy after being taken. There was just a short scene as Joy remembers it, and their mouth were duct-taped ("It put tape on our mouths"). In the hospital, we learn that Joy was drugged and thus almost completely unable to speak. Alex and Bob were both very traumatized by their kidnapping. Early in the ...


2

Bob Taylor was obsessed with this book and thought the described hypothetical abductor was the kidnapper that he fled from in his childhood, so much is clear, I think: So he read the book and decided he was taken by the "Invisble Man*. The question now is, was this described kidnapper actually Mr. Jones? I think it is strongly hinted, even if maybe ...


2

In my opinion, while it is possible, it is unlikely that the book is about Mr. Jones, the kidnapper. I base this conclusion on the presence of the maze and other circumstantial indicators. The kidnapper was wearing a pendant with the symbol of the maze. The book, Finding the Invisible Man, also has mazes in it. It even has a maze on its cover. Bob Taylor ...


2

I don't think it's inconsistent at all, because these were the first children the woman had taken on her own. She began the pattern of child snatching with her husband who is long gone, and she mentions that she slowed down once he disappeared. Also, these girls weren't the only ones to be kept alive as there's also Alex. She also says she brought them ...


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I don't think that there's any inconsistency in the fact that the girls were not killed immediately. The two other victims that we are aware of, namely Alex and Bob (Taylor), were also not killed. Bob Taylor escaped from the Joneses after three weeks (?) of captivity. So it seems that the modus operandi does not involve killing the children immediately. ...


2

I'm not sure if the following is sufficient as a complete answer already, but it should give some insights into how Det. Loki was intended and what he might have stood for, even if not giving too deep an analysis of his character and its meaning: During his interview with Jake Hamilton Jake Gyllenhaal talks a bit about Det. Loki's character and what he ...


2

I think it is more of a commentary on the human nature and behavior under extreme circumstances. Yes, the setting is very religiously painted, but I think it is here more to emphasize the main message, and less to comment on the religion itself. Let's take a look at the two religious main characters. Keller Dover is a deeply religious, one might say quite ...


2

The main aspect of Alex's character here is, that he had "the IQ of a ten year old" and he was bound to his "aunt" Holly. He was incredibly loyal and dependent on her due to the years of brain-washing (for the lack of a better term). I'm not saying he feared Holly or was actively threatened by her, but he was entirely dependent on her and unable to say ...


2

Holly said that "adopting Alex helped [them cope with the loss of their son]. But [they] never got over it". From this I conclude that their first victim, Alex, was an attempt to replace their own dead son. But, since they never got over it (over their son's death), they lost their faith and went on killing children, as a revenge on God.



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