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10

There's probably no deeper meaning to it Podrick is pretty much seen as the comedic sidekick. In both the books and the TV show he is the unfortunate recipient of plenty of witty quips (mostly by Tyrion), even the fandom have picked him up as a funny meme of sort ("I blame Pod" is very widespread among fans). Also, the incident with the whores never ...


9

You might not have watched it yet, but in the season finale Podrick went to the courtyard to tell Tyrion there was a family meeting going on, and a couple of girls giggled and said, "Ooh, that’s him!", indicating that his reputation is spreading by word of mouth. I think the in-universe answer is supposed to be yes, Podrick really is a good lover.


7

Did Bran and Jojen do the same with a passage? Yes, the same passage, and Samwell and Gilly actually meet Brann, Jojen, Meera and Hodor in the The Nightfort after the former have just come through the sally port, in S03E10- Mhysa: They're never really in the same shot together, but that's Sam's shoulder on the left of the frame. And the reverse ...


6

I'd guess the movie's motive for not introducing the McKee subplot is because that was only a minor subplot of the book. And re-telling a book story in movie form, when you've got to get all the key details on screen in just 2 or 3 hours, means you have to omit many minor details. The core story of The Great Gatsby is about Gatsby and the world he lived in, ...


5

The big deal about the 'miracle of the train' was that it was perpetual motion engine: if it were to stop, it would no longer be contributing the momentum necessary to maintain its forward velocity... As for Why the train needed to keep moving in the first place: the entire film is a parable about society, from a dystopian perspective. In the event of a ...


5

This scene was playing on the many negative behaviours of a meth addict. Many users of meth experience increased paranoia, energy, a greater sense of alertness and very unpredictable behaviour. Jesse, knowing a lot about meth, plays on this by creating a scene with the shovel and pretending he's looking for something. The paranoid, curious Tucker can't ...


4

Actually, when Clarice examined the dead girl in the local mortuary earlier on, one of the things she noticed was two unexplained diamond shaped areas cut out of the back of that girl, in addition to the gunshot wound made at close range (muzzle stamp on the skin) and a death's head moth (or pupae, I can't remember which) stuck, or shoved down, the throat of ...


3

After thinking over the movie more, I am providing a second answer that is not necessarily contrary to my other answer. The strongest evidence that Cage does retain the ability to loop is his final loop itself (at end of movie, when he wakes up in the helicopter near Big Ben). Clearly his looping ability has been restored, and there is nothing in the movie ...


3

This is a great first question. This answer by no means definitively resolves your question, but it's the best I can do! I think Sherlock's interest in the phone is down to a few reasons. Firstly, he has been tasked by Mycroft and the government to track down the phone and recover its contents. Once the contents have been verified, they will be destroyed. ...


2

The Ancient Enemy wanted the people to know about it, as you said it wanted Flyte to "write the gospel". It thought itself to be superior than anything else and it actually wanted nothing else than boast with its supposed superiority. So in order for the people to fully see and admire/fear the majesty of the Ancient Enemy they had to fully understand it. ...


2

They were making a "curse" In Gloria Mendoza's flashback we see that she used to have a side business selling charms to bring good luck. That would also mean that she believed in making curses as well. Her solution to the Vee problem was to curse her. We see later that misfortune does befall Vee, but whether it was because of Mendoza's spell or not is up ...


2

Although I agree that Red Dwarf is loose with its own history, and I wouldn't think too hard about inconsistencies from (in particular) the first 2 seasons. However, Lister was adopted, and so I've always thought the woman pictured was one of his adopted parents mothers. It's frequently mentioned throughout the show (often by Rimmer as a putdown) that he was ...


1

The diamond pattern itself doesn't mean anything, but Clarice recognizes it from earlier. Cuts in the same pattern were taken from the skin of one of Buffalo Bill's earlier victims. Clarice realized from her talks with Lecter that Buffalo Bill knew his first victim, Fredrica Bimmel, which was why Clarice was in Fredrica's room to begin with. So yes, Buffalo ...


1

To add to John Smith's answer on the symbolic aspect of the movie, it can be noted that in the comics, the train actually can stop! More precisely, there is a second train in the second and third tome. Larger and more comfortable than the first one, the autocratic central government keeps the power using the fear of a collision with the first train. The ...


1

I don't think there is a definitive answer to this question until we get the future Bond films. However my thoughts were that initially he was involved with MI6 & M to control what she was doing because she had broken rules and the government were questioning these. Through the events of Skyfall he becomes aware that there is a very good reason why M ...



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