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11

I believe it's a built-in sub-conscious instinct that, with enough force of will or self-sentience, can be over-ridden. The toys attacking Sid being a good example of gaining the force of will to ignore this instinct.


9

Pixar’s subsequent films act like a timeline of technological developments in computer graphics. Building on the work of other researchers, 2001’s Monsters, Inc. introduced the on-screen representation of fur. Two years later, Finding Nemo pioneered new techniques in digital lighting, which were used to create realistic-looking water. The Incredibles and ...


8

To be honest I don't think there is any real issue here regarding similar films from the two animation stables and disagree with anyone who thinks there are more than two comparable sets of films in the original question. Firstly, we can eliminate two of your examples, as Dreamworks were not involved (The Wild, Robots), so perhaps the question could be made ...


8

As seems to be the case in all of the movies, the toys don't seem to gain sentience unless they are not being looked at or being played with by a human child. You see this with the other Buzz Lightyear toys they all believe they are Buzz. You also see this shortly after Buzz in introduced when Andy is flying him around the room you see Woody turn his head ...


8

Andy is 12, or darn close, in Toy Story 2. As you point out, he's 8 in the first movie. And according to Wikipedia, the second one takes place four years later:


7

I'd say that iandotkelly actually answered this in the comments. The most likely thing that happened is that Helen had someone in the receptionist office watch Jack Jack while the principal had a serious discussion with her about Dash, since babies can be very distracting to such a talk. It's quite common for parents to bring their younger kids with them to ...


5

Here you can find all technical memo's and publications of Pixar. Most of them can be directly related to the movie they are developed for, or used in by the images provided. Note that many of their publications are published in SIGGRAPH, which is one of the worlds biggest conferences/journals on Computer Graphics/animations. So they do new and innovative ...


5

Unsurprisingly, the true details are hard to dig up, but this is nothing new. Pixar has a reputation for major shake-ups during production, see this extract from an article on hitfix.com: They have the best track record in the business for a reason. They have a carefully managed story department, and they are ruthless during development. They have had ...


4

Adding to Christian Rau's excellent answer, I would also like to say that modern feature films are rarely the creative brainchild of a single person, but rather created with a lot of corporate input, often from marketing departments backed by data from polls and focus groups. "Robots are going to be hot this year!", they'll exclaim. "Make us a flick about ...


3

I cannot provide you with any interview, but only common sense. Those similarities are observable quite often and even more than the movies using similar concepts, they are usually also released in close succession (that's why I don't think the example Wall-E - Robots is a good one, given how far both movies are apart in their premises and release dates, but ...


3

I don't think its an inconsistency. The first time when Nemo puts the pebble into the fan, he swims back into the tank. During this time, the other fishes are busy uprooting the fake plant and pushing it into the fan. They don't notice Nemo has already arrived. When they push the plant into the fan, the fan is pushed across, and what we hear is the sound of ...


2

There are automatic hair generation and physics-based animation bolt-ons available for most common commercial CGI creation/rendering packages, these have been around for a long while really. That said Pixar do tend to write their own software and will probably have done so for 'Brave'. Essentially you define the area on the head where hair is to be, you ...


1

There is only one movie couple in this list that is a real and proved issue. A Bug's Life and Ants. As you can read here, and in more detail in Steve Jobs biography, it really seems like there was something going on at the time between Pixar and Dreamworks, and in particular between Dreamwork's Jeffrey Katzenberg and Pixar's Steve Jobs & John Lassete. ...



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