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54

Within the logic of Cars, buses act as mobile billboards, as well as providing guided tours of London I love the detail in our films. I believe God is in the details. We put so much detail into this film. The more you look, the more you’ll see of car parts, car shapes. Every sign, every street name, everything… Every ad on the sides or on the buses ...


14

According to Wiki: A113 (sometimes A-113 or A1-13) is an inside joke, an Easter egg in animated films created by alumni of California Institute of the Arts, referring to the classroom used by graphic design and character animation students including John Lasseter and Brad Bird. You can see John Lasseter explaining it here: ...


11

Here you can find all technical memo's and publications of Pixar. Most of them can be directly related to the movie they are developed for, or used in by the images provided. Note that many of their publications are published in SIGGRAPH, which is one of the worlds biggest conferences/journals on Computer Graphics/animations. So they do new and innovative ...


10

To be honest I don't think there is any real issue here regarding similar films from the two animation stables and disagree with anyone who thinks there are more than two comparable sets of films in the original question. Firstly, we can eliminate two of your examples, as Dreamworks were not involved (The Wild, Robots), so perhaps the question could be made ...


10

Pixar’s subsequent films act like a timeline of technological developments in computer graphics. Building on the work of other researchers, 2001’s Monsters, Inc. introduced the on-screen representation of fur. Two years later, Finding Nemo pioneered new techniques in digital lighting, which were used to create realistic-looking water. The Incredibles and ...


5

Unsurprisingly, the true details are hard to dig up, but this is nothing new. Pixar has a reputation for major shake-ups during production, see this extract from an article on hitfix.com: They have the best track record in the business for a reason. They have a carefully managed story department, and they are ruthless during development. They have had ...


5

Adding to Christian Rau's excellent answer, I would also like to say that modern feature films are rarely the creative brainchild of a single person, but rather created with a lot of corporate input, often from marketing departments backed by data from polls and focus groups. "Robots are going to be hot this year!", they'll exclaim. "Make us a flick about ...


3

I cannot provide you with any interview, but only common sense. Those similarities are observable quite often and even more than the movies using similar concepts, they are usually also released in close succession (that's why I don't think the example Wall-E - Robots is a good one, given how far both movies are apart in their premises and release dates, but ...


3

Possibly, but it doesn’t seem to be by design. A Pixar employee, Jay Ward, who was fairly involved in Cars, was asked about this shortly after the posting of Negroni’s theory in an interview with Jason Torchinsky at io9. He rebuts the theory: JT: What do you think about it? JW: I think somebody had a lot of time on their hands. They may have had ...


1

There is only one movie pair in this list that is a real and proved issue. A Bug's Life and Ants. As you can read here, and in more detail in Steve Jobs's biography, it really seems like there was something going on at the time between Pixar and Dreamworks, and in particular between Dreamwork's Jeffrey Katzenberg and Pixar's Steve Jobs & John Lasseter. ...



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