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16

Tod Browning's controversial cult horror film Freaks from 1932. The central story is of this conniving trapeze artist Cleopatra, who seduces and marries sideshow midget Hans after learning of his large inheritance. At their wedding reception, the other "freaks" announce that they accept Cleopatra in spite of her being a "normal" outsider; they hold an ...


11

But the phrase is not exclusive to Trainspotting. It comes from the Bible (Deuteronomy 30:19), and the design in the pictures you posted looks like the T-shirt popularized by the Wham! video for Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go in 1984 (you can see it from the very start): ...


7

"See you on the other side" is also a reference to the afterlife. It was possibly used in reference to the River Styx and the crossing of such river into the afterlife. This was the meaning Jim Morrison had when he wrote "Break On Through (To The Other Side)", which was released a year or so before the Apollo 8 mission.


5

Most likely this reference started it's life out as a reference to the astronauts conversation during the Apollo 8 mission, as they passed behind the moon for the first time: CapCom Gerry Carr spoke to the three astronauts more than 200,000 miles away, "Ten seconds to go. You are GO all the way." Lovell replied, "We'll see you on the other side", and ...


4

According to TVTropes, the first use of this was in 1895!: [The breaking the fourth wall trope] dates back to the Lumière brothers and the first films made for publicviewing in 1895—specifically, The Photographical Congress Arrives in Lyon, in which several of the photographers wave or doff their hats to the camera. You can barely make it out here: ...


2

This is a (misattributed, according to Wiki) George S. Patton quote: Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I shall fear no evil, because I am the meanest son-of-a-bitch in the valley. (This was a widely published anonymous derivative of Psalm 23 which arose in the early 1970s on wall-posters, plaques and t-shirts, with an ...


2

This quote was attributed to Bill Finger who died in 1974, he was best known as the uncredited actual creator of Batman


2

Here's a book from 1945: The pilot was either very brave or very stupid http://books.google.ie/books?id=TvsDAAAAYAAJ&q=%22very+brave+or+very+stupid%22&dq=%22very+brave+or+very+stupid%22&hl=ga&sa=X&ei=9Y68U9bSNoWI7AbZgYHoCQ&redir_esc=y Experiment with Google n-gram viewer to find other/closer versions of the quote.


1

No I don't think that it is. Although there is no documentation as to whether or not it "borrowed" any idea from that episode if you come to think about it then you will see that the storyline of Bedtime Stories is pretty common. There are a lot of times similar plots in movies, series and literature about little girls creating their own fantasy worlds and ...


1

In this particular instance, I do not believe the line spoken by Starlord to the Guardians of the Galaxy at the end of the movie was in reference to anything, it seems, more than anything, to be setting itself up for there being a second Guardian's of the Galaxy movie: What should we do next? Something good? Something bad? A bit of both? Roll Credits ...


1

I think The Sea Hawk (1940) might qualify as an origin, at least in film. You were very brave, trying to take this ship single-handed. Thank you, sir. Brave but stupid. Source I would venture to guess that something very similar was written in a book long before.



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