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26

Not 100% definitive, but I always thought that he did. Evidence that he kills her: Its explicitly stated that he does in the book The shot of him inspecting his boots on the way out implies that he is checking for blood


24

First of all, the movie is based on the novel of the same name by Cormac McCarthy. Numerous times in the course of the movie you can see Sheriff Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones) expressing his thoughts on a moral corruption in society nowadays and often compares it to the time of his predecessors ("oldtimers"). One example quote taken from IMDB: I was ...


19

The film doesn't give us an answer, but the book does. Chigurh (as explained to Carson Wells in the novel) allowed himself to be arrested (he was pulled over after he left the scene) for killing a man in a parking lot after the man said something Chigurh didn't like. He (Chigurh) wanted to see if he could "will" his way out of the situation. Although the ...


18

The title refers to the idea that the nature of evil has changed, and old value systems no longer apply. Both the movie and the book versions of No Country For Old Men repeatedly touch on how the aging-sheriff protagonist feels he's no longer a match for modern criminals. Going a little deeper, I believe the title is a commentary on geopolitics in the ...


17

The title implies that the sheriff is old and outdated. Unable to handle the crimes of today's crazy criminals. Llewelyn Moss represents the modern day worker. Who gets caught up in the criminal world. Llewelyn should have been able to make his escape with the money, because he demonstrates a coolness under pressure and modern cleverness. He represents the ...


10

It's about the fear of aging/death, and the title is taken from a Yeats poem. The story is really about the sheriff. He's unable to cope with modernity and continuously refers to how the old days or old timers were and talks as if the world is going downhill. Moss represents the youthful search for materialism, while Chigurh represents death. Death can ...


9

The story is absolutely about Sheriff Bell, and despite the fact that the majority of the action focuses on Llewelyn Moss, his story is really only a subplot. The main arc of the story actually concerns itself with Bell's decision to quit policing in the face of what he considers to be unstoppable violence. That is the subtext behind the movie's title, as ...


9

I don't know that I necessarily disagree with the other answer posted but I've read the book and seen the film and I don't think that an "explanation" can be copied so easily from one to the other. I found the difference in the way they treat the character of Chigurh is so great that the two stories are practically independent. In the film, Chigurh is ...


6

Chigurh was called in by the (unseen) ringleader, after the drug deal went bad. His main assignment is to recover the money. A secondary assignment is to kill the guys who the ringleader had hired to set up the deal that went bad (apparently the ringleader doesn't tolerate screw-ups). But first Chigurh needs their information and their transponders, so he ...


6

Having read the book, I was under the impression it was the Mexicans who took the heroin, that is, the same guys who chase Moss after he returns to the cars in the night. When Moss first finds the cars and the drugs, it is clear that he doesn't take the heroin with him: "He wet his forefinger and dipped it in the powder and smelled it. Then he wiped his ...


5

I think that people are impressed because of the role of the psychopathe. In this movie Javier Bardem proves to everyone that he is an excellent actor. His performance is just amazing, the end leaves the spectator breathless. The story is not so incredible, it's just the story of a man chased by another one. In my opinion, the movie is priceless because of ...


5

Unless I'm remembering this wrong, he didn't plan this ahead of time. He hid the bag in that vent with a string attached to it, planning to retrieve it later from the same room. But when he saw the truck outside his room, he got paranoid and decided to go to the adjacent room and pull the bag through there without the cartel guys (who, as he correctly ...


3

The title of the book refers to how Sheriff Bell comes to understand that he is no match for the current and irrepressible evil that the present world had to offer. Through Bell following Moss and Chigurh in hopes to save Moss and capture Chigurh, he must see every gory act of violence and evil that Chigurh leaves in his path. This is a hard and emotionally ...


3

Chigurh has no regard for who he kills at all. He gambled a shop keepers' life on the flip of a coin. He killed those men because he is indeed a murderous lunatic: Man Who Hires Wells: I'd just like to know your opinion of him. In general. Just how dangerous is he? Wells: Compared to what? The bubonic plague? He's bad enough that you called me. ...


2

Was he anticipating Chigurh to also be there, as the conversation with the local sheriff hinted at it? I am not sure he really expected him to be there. It was more of a hunch, triggered by what the local Sheriff told him: ROSCOE: That don't hardly say it. He shoots the desk clerk one day, and walks right back in the next and shoots a retired army ...


2

As mentioned in the comments, the movie's themes are explored and contrasted in some detail in this wiki. Some viewers focus on certain aspects of the plot while others prefer other aspects. In light of the title of the film, the following critiques are probably good summaries of what you could interpret from this Cormac McCarthy story: William J. Devlin ...


2

He's in the room next door. If you watch the scene again, Tommy Lee Jones notices the lock is destroyed and then proceeds to clear the room. The scene then cuts to Chigurh in another room of the motel listening to the sheriff and watching his movements as shadows through the destroyed lock of the door leading to the adjoining room. Reference: ...


2

The times have changed. Crime has spanned out across a country that never experienced drug deals gone wrong, contract killers who use automatic shotguns with suppressors, tech nines, or cattle guns to kill strangers passing through. And to steal their vehicles. Sheriff Bell never heard of people killing old folks to cash their social security checks. Some ...


2

The mexicans driving the pick up truck shooting the buck shot at Moss. They quickly cut his tires and went after him for the missing money. They didn't want to kill Moss so he'd be able to tell them where the money is. Poor Moss was providing a generous humanitarian effort to the mexican who asked him the previous evening for agua. These were the same men, ...


2

The answer is there is an unseen layer in the movie. In the book he kills off the men who set up the botched drug buy, including the man who hired Wells. He then returns the money to the money man who is not shown in the movie. He then sets himself up as the in between man for the money backer.


1

He's in a trans. He found a case with two million dollars and all he owned was a beat up truck and renting a trailer to reside in with Carla. He was just a hard working welder. He wasn't cut out for this like Carson told him at the hospital. You find something like that you have to find a way to stash it forever. Especially after seeing dead people in an ...


1

If memory serves... Americans are buying drugs from Mexicans, but the deal goes bad. Chigurh is hired by the Americans to retrieve their money. Once he's killed half of Texas, and brought a whole lot of unwanted attention on himself, all while failing to actually retrieve the money, the Americans get scared that Chigurh has gone nuts or may get caught and ...


1

The cattle gun Chigurh used was with him while he sat frozen like a statue. Carla wouldn't call the coin toss so he got up slowly and pointed it at her forehead. Her last words were "now I know why the sheriff told me about this." He took her car keys, left the cattle gun behind and was on his way to retirement...sort of...Chigurh was in a vehicle accident ...


1

It ties into Chigurh's ultimate flaw as the "ultimate badass", he is arrogant. He only puts himself directly into situations, in which he firmly believes he has control over. Note that in every scene, he quite literally dominates the pace, tone and direction of the conversation. This is also true in his actions, whom does he terrorize? A young naive sheriff ...



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