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51

I have worked with children on horror films/thrillers and, having found no official guidelines from SAG other than payment policies such as Coogan's Law, I have usually employed a number of tactics. Firstly, I'll go over the scene and storyboard very carefully with the child's parents/guardians (although this isn't always constructive as many parents will ...


42

A fun example from "The Shining": Because Danny Lloyd was so young and since it was his first acting job, Stanley Kubrick was highly protective of the child. During the shooting of the movie, Lloyd was under the impression that the film he was making was a drama, not a horror movie. He only realized the truth seven years later, when, aged 13, he ...


26

The editing, filming techniques, and set attitude can seriously change the perception of what is actually going on. In various horror movie "behind the scenes" (last I can think of is Sam Raimi commentary on Evil Dead), it seems like casts for horror flicks are very upbeat and everybody is having fun. With many horror films it's only once the scenes are ...


24

In order for a film to get a 12A or PG-13 rating, it cannot contain gratuitous use of profanity: One 'Fuck' is allowed, anymore and it automatically becomes a 15 or R rated. That article features a very humorous piece of meta-textuality, referring to the Movie Be Cool, in which budding film producer Chili Palma states: “Do you know that unless you're ...


17

Nobody outside the MPAA really knows for sure. There are some general rules that filmmakers follow, depending on what kind of rating they want to go for. A movie can change from PG to PG-13 if it uses a swear word like 'fuck' more than once; some scenes of violence have to be toned down to get a rating of NC-17 (which is considered the rating of death for ...


17

I've some experiences in freelancing. I guess this answer is correct because I've seen numerous job postings like this to give positive reviews. But one point to be noted is that, to stop this sort of rating manipulation, IMDB only counts votes from regular voters. That means if you just register and give couple of movies very high ratings, you votes are not ...


11

The MPAA is made up of a group of people that are not connected to the movie industry, overseen by Joan Graves, that make their decisions based on a predetermined 'list' of acceptable and unacceptable behaviors/language.(This wiki-link to the guidelines touches upon the list of acceptable content) According to the MPAA website, these ratings are in place to ...


8

It's difficult to say who's hiring, but I know at least one source where people are offering. I would guess fiverr is more for the amateurs. Big movie studios generate enough buzz on their own to get people talking and rating.


7

I have also worked on film sets and I concur with @Nobby. I think a larger point, though, is that situations are generally only “scary” when actors are in character. For example consider Halloween. An adult dressed like a corpse and covered in bruise makeup and fake blood isn’t scary to most children if she’s chatting and laughing and walking around as if ...


6

I know it's a different system, but there was a fascinating interview with the head of the BBFC (the British equivalent of the MPAA) on BBC radio last week. The complete programme is available to download as a podcast (look for the "Daniel Craig, 16 Dec 11" episode). He explains that they have certain rules of thumb (e.g. no more than 4 uses of the F-word ...


6

I'm almost certain it comes down to parent permission and what they are comfortable allowing the child to see when working with the directors. Some are naturally more lenient than others while I'm sure some are only allowed on set to film their scenes and they never get to see what they filmed after post-production because of it being too graphic. (The ...


6

This is a good question. From the MPAA website, a PG rating may include: ...some profanity and some depictions of violence or brief nudity. But these elements are not deemed so intense as to require that parents be strongly cautioned beyond the suggestion of parental guidance... Nowhere on the site does it explicitly mention death by natural causes. At ...


5

This is a really interesting question. I've tried to find some sort of list of "banned" television shows, but I came up completely empty. You are of course right that many directors and producers have complained about movies being damaged by content ratings, but not television shows. I did find some possible reasons why though. To begin, it's worth ...


5

Wikipedia has a page detailing the history of star ratings. The film section reads: In the 31 July 1928 issue of the New York Daily News, the newspaper's film critic Irene Thirer began grading movies on a scale of zero to three stars. Three stars meant 'excellent,' two 'good,' and one star meant 'mediocre.' And no stars at all 'means the picture's right ...


4

I think Andrew Martin's answer provides the main reason why this never happens: Shows usually get censored by the network, not by TV content rating standards. So showrunners will obviously blame the network if anyone. This happens a lot, Family Guy for example, which often pushes the boundaries, regularly makes jokes within the episodes about their network ...


4

Although this answer is late I asked myself the same question just now. I wanted to look at a movie called Alien Armageddon and decided to see what imdb said before I did. Most people gave it a low rating. I was curious about the few persons giving high ratings to a movie that was overall rated very low. I found this strange. So I looked one up and saw the ...


4

I'm not American and can't give legal advice, but I'd strongly suspect this was just a diligent movie theatre. Cinemas are not legally bound by these ratings. They are simply recommendations made by the NPAA and seconded by the National Association of Theater Owners. To quote from the article linked: In the MPAA's official Classification and Ratings ...


2

Well if you take into consideration the MPAA just established the ratings board in 1968 and on the board sits 8-13 members and these members watch each film and rate it for what their generalizations of what the "American public" would think of a particular film. Bias? or Gatekeepers? Hmmm... Another thing of note that complicates matters -- with DVR's ...



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