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15

At the start of the movie, the main character (as a boy) is intrigued by ideas from multiple religions, but his father says everyone must choose just one religion. So from the beginning, the core dilemma facing the main character involves his personal understanding of God. This dilemma is resolved by the end of the film: when the main character shares the ...


15

EDIT March 9 2013: Here's author Martel's explanation: island served the sole purpose of making the “animal” version of the story harder and harder to believe. “Many readers assume it is something deeply symbolic they just don’t get, or it’s an hallucination –they need a reason to prop up the fiction.” But in his own words “religion goes beyond ...


12

OK, assuming the 2nd story is the true one, then we analyze the symbolism in the first story and accept the assignment of the animals to people given by the author/narrator, which concludes with "...and you are the tiger." We know that Pi (tiger) killed (and possibly ate) the cook (hyena). We also know that Pi coexisted with the tiger, as though Pi and the ...


12

I haven't read the book. Firstly, the agents were Japanese. From WP's page for the film: In the present day, the novelist notes the parallels between the two stories: the orangutan was Pi's mother, the zebra was the sailor, the hyena was the cook, and Richard Parker, the tiger, was Pi himself. Pi asks him which story the writer prefers, and the writer ...


11

The film won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects largely because that tiger looked so real. Special effects supervisor Bill Westenhofer wrote in an interview for Digital Trends “We used [real tigers] for single shots, where it was just the tiger in the frame, and they’re doing something that didn’t have to be all that specific in the action that ...


9

First let me tell you that the ending of the movie is intentionally kept dim because it is the main attraction part of the movie. There are a lot of successful movies where a question is kept alive intentionally through out the movie and never a perfect answer is given because public like mystery and they likes solving it themselves if no answer is given ...


7

Here is a quote from an interview with Yann Martel, 'Life of Pi' Author (Empasis mine): [...] The island, ah, the island. The most frequently asked question: What does the island mean? It means what you choose to see in it. My narrative strategy in writting this book was to write a story that was progressively harder to believe. Will you believe that a ...


7

The island, a place for rest and regaining strength for Pi after his lost all his hope (or rationality), has been suggested by some Taiwanese blogger as being a symbol of the difficult moment that he consumed the remaining of his own MOTHER. A few clues suggested this link: the lotus shaped flower (his mother draw a lotus graph in an early stage of the ...


6

Not only Buddhism but there are many more religions left, too. Especially Sikhs which are far more famous religion. Even Janism, as in India there are more followers of Janism than Buddhism. Fact is that India is too rich in religions, so it's harder to include them all in one single movie. Another reason may be that the Film was shot in Puducherry (Pi's ...


6

The answer is that both real animals and Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) were used. Clearly in situations which will put an animal or an actor in danger, they will use CGI. See this article.


6

Men typically start developing facial hair in the later years of puberty or adolescence, between seventeen and twenty years of age, and most do not finish developing a fully adult beard until their early twenties or later. This varies, as boys may first develop facial hair between fourteen and sixteen years of age, and boys as young as eleven ...


5

I think that the island is a mental state that pi is in. Looking down at his feet he would see bones of his victims in the boat. I think that maybe he realises what he is doing especially when he sees the human tooth. I also think he stays on the raft because of the horrors on the boat ie: drying corpse. He probably ate at night because he couldn't really ...


4

Why does the writer prefer the tiger story? For a 'flat' hearted person - the story is interesting, dramatic and worth remembering... For a 'deep' hearted person - the story is all the above, because it is wonderful and pleasant, it makes the incident a not regretful one and a memory to cherish beyond all those cruel things that has happened... it has made ...


4

Disclaimer: If you haven't seen the movie yet, please don't read this answer. I know there are people who like to believe the animal story. I did too, but when talking about it with someone else, I realized it's just our human side that makes us want to believe it. We don't like the other being true because it's so sad and dramatic. But as much as I loved ...


3

I've read the book, though I haven't seen the movie. The book pretends to be based on a true story with a scene where the author goes to interview the grown up Pi. An amazing job is done with the characterization in the book, so much that it is my favorite part-more than any of the dramatic events. Because of this, I don't think that it's about ...


3

If the movie about capturing every single religion in India, you can bet that it would be lengthier than four hours. We are too diverse to be in one movie. Either way, it wouldn't be too logical that Pi would get impressed by Buddhist traditions since we have a very minor proportion of Buddhists. I guess the writer was being a realist and his intention was ...


3

From my perspective there were no animals involved. The cook (hyena) killed and partially ate the buddhist with the broken leg (zebra) and then turned on Pi's mother (orangutan), killing her. This brought out Pi's rage (Richard Parker) and he killed the cook. To survive at sea he partially ate the cook, and then I believe he ate his mother. That is what ...


2

All of you may seem to have missed the following two scenes that suggest that first story was true: When Pi throws the swim ring in the water to save 'someone' only to find that someone to be 'Richard Parker' instead. And then he keeps saying No while NOT allowing Richard Parker in the boat. So 'Richard Parker' doesn't come out of the shed 'all of a ...


1

The answer lies in the ageless riddle "if a tree falls in the forest and no one is around, does it make a sound?" You see, for many who are familiar with this philosophy it is understood that it is a question of faith. If you believe the tree does indeed make a sound, then you are a believer in God. Knowingly or not (I mean believer in God, not necessarily ...


1

The shot taken where Pi sees the rotting/dissolving fish in the pond below, it symbolizes an eye..does it mean that Pi sees the rot in the cook's body? I actually thought that the island looked like a woman. But I need to take a look again. So it's quite possible that Pi eats his own mother in order to survive and then cannot bear it and leaves the island. ...



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