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18

I do not believe we can definitively answer this question. It refers to an extinct animal used in a movie for a specific plot reason: to resolve the conflict at the climax of the movie. We do not know how Mosasaurus would react in either of its feeding scenarios presented in the movie. However, we can apply logic and see where it takes us. The amphitheater ...


16

It was hungry, with a large, loud, distract, and injured prey within reach. It has gone at least half a day without being fed. The Indominus Rex is louder by multiple orders of magnitude than the crowd, a single point of sound, and likely in the right hearing range of the Mosasaurus. The Indominus is distracted. Ambush predators take their prey's attention ...


10

Jurassic Park not Jurassic Zoo because it's meant to be an amusement park. An amusement park has a lot of attractions, rides, merchandise sale etc. like Disney land. Here, instead of clowns and cartoon characters, we have dinosaurs, but we also have a lots of attractions and rides. A lot of these things have been shown in Jurassic Park as well as The Lost ...


9

Out of Universe: In an interview with MoviePilot, Jurassic World director and writer Colin Trevorrow stated that the goal was to build a new film franchise, rather than merely being a sequel of the old film trilogy. "[There never was plans to bring back any of the original trio]. I never saw a draft in which they were included, and I think I looked at ...


7

It probably comes from the distinction between 'zoos' and 'Safari parks'. Zoos are typically areas with cages in which animals are 'displayed' and the public walk around looking into the cages. So, outside, looking in. 'Safari parks' generally have differing groups of animals in a more natural habit with some freedom to roam and interact. In safari parks, ...


7

Very early in the process, several of the actors had been, at various points, asked to reprise roles. Obviously, by the time the final draft had been accepted, Sir Richard Attenborough had passed away and he wasn't an option. Also, by that time, the story had changed and was scripted to take place 22 years after the original trilogy. A fairly detailed ...


6

The simplest answer is that the T-Rex didn't come in through the main doors, it came through the (now open to the elements) side entrance, shouldering its way through the scaffolding:


5

This was explained in the novel and was planned to be explained in the film, but the scene was cut for time. Here's a summary from /Film Trivia: Why Was the Triceratops Sick in ‘Jurassic Park’? In the film we learn that the Triceratops is getting sick every six weeks or so. Dr. Ellie Sattler first believes the culprit may be the West Indian Lilac berries ...


5

This was discussed at some length in an article about Tippett for Wired Magazine: Originally, Steven Spielberg’s life finds a way dinosaur amusement park movie was going to be done with stop-motion miniatures from Tippett combined in post-production with larger robotic dinosaurs created by special effects master Stan Winston. But then Muren told ...


5

First off, the embryos aren't viable without a host. In the source novel, there's mention of both "artificial wombs" and a material used to make artificial eggshell that houses the embryos. Without such a mechanism, they'll just die. Then, in 1987, InGen bought an obscure company called Millipore Plastic Products in Nashville, Tennessee. This was an ...


3

Michael Crichton's foreword to the Audiobook version of Jurassic Park specifically addresses this point. The island is intended to be a theme park (e.g. complete with rides and attractions), not just a zoological garden for animals. "I wrote a screenplay about cloning a pterodactyl from fossil DNA in 1983, but the story wasn’t convincing. I worked on ...


3

Obviously the main thing to note is that the two films are set decades apart. The costs will have changed dramatically. Jurassic World There's a quote regarding the cost of the I-Rex™. Masrani indicates that the total amount spent on the "asset" is in the ballpark of $26M. Owen: You're going after her with non-lethals?? Masrani: We have $26 ...


2

According to me, there is another possibility here. We can see the electrical fences in the first shot. But there was no electricity when Mosasaurus drags Indominous Rex. Probably, that made easier for Mosasaurus to attack Indominous instead of humans. According to the comment by @snowman, we can only presume the behavior of Mosasaurus based on other ...


2

To figure out the cost of creating a dinosaur, you can extrapolate from real life. Good sir, we live in the future! Bio Arts, is one of a handful of companies that clones people's dogs. They charge a mere $150,000 to clone a dog. However, that process is much simpler than cloning an extinct animal. Any human IVF treatment has about a 34% rate of success, so ...


1

There is no official statement about this, these are just the logical options: They will probably not hatch since it's to cold outside. They will be buried in the ground and mud ... forever... . The embryos will get found by another dinosaur and get eaten. I doubt it would be warm enough for them to hatch, but it's an option :) The first option is most ...


1

There are three components to the price. The first component would be creating an artificial egg and implanting an embryo in it. This is the science fiction portion of the process. In the original book, a new material had been developed that could mimic bird eggshell. I'm going to ballpark that each egg needed as much as 2 pounds of that material (would ...


1

The following is simply my opinion. I think that the main point here is to show that even if Hammond & C. keep saying that everything is under control, nothing actually is, and the reserchers did not think about all the problems that might arise bringing dinosaurs back on earth in a new (for them) ecosystem.


1

I've worked on the implementation of automatic guided forklifts which travel around facilities by following low-frequency signals sent through wires in the floor. The wire needed to be within about an inch of the surface of the floor for reliable guidance; in an outdoor scenario with unpaved roads, an unprotected wire close enough to the surface to offer ...



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