Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Yes, it all looks like real code. The window on the left looks like Object Pascal code for Classic Mac OS judging by: the := assignment syntax. The NEDRYLAND :MPW:Examples: (cut off) window title. MPW is Macintosh Programmer's Workshop (a Classic Mac OS development environment), the font is Chicago (the default Classic Mac OS font) and the colon-delimited ...


16

In a word, No. According to this Natural History Museum fact file, Professor Jeremy Austin describes the possibility of recovering a sufficient quantity of usable DNA to recreate a dinosaur as being essentially zero. NHM: Do you think it likely that scientists will ever be able to extract enough DNA from fossilized remains to reconstruct the complete ...


16

  That's a picture of J. Robert Oppenheimer, one of the fathers of the atomic bomb (Manhattan Project). Notice the left post-it note? It shows a mushroom cloud and the word "BOOM".       [Source]


7

This looks like Delphi (or a pascal derivative) because of the semi colons at the end of the lines and also the := assignment operator. Delphi is also a RAD language which would be good for building out their screens. Edit: Based on the related question of the system running unix, Delphi can be done on *nix Note: Object Pascal (Delphi) is generally not ...


1

The exact diologue is to my knowledge nowhere to be found in any of the movies. But I think in a quite changed form it is still there in the book's adaptation. In the scene in Jurassic Park where they all are dining after their first welcome to the facility and after visiting the labs, Dr. Ian Malcolm says something pretty much to the same effect: ...


1

I read a book on this once, but unfortunately i don't remember the name or author... Recovering dinosaur DNA from mosquitoes trapped in amber would be practically impossible. First of all, there's a good chance that whatever the mosquito last sucked blood from was not a dino. There goes a whole bunch of samples. Now, if somehow, you have a mosquito that ...


1

I'm inclined to say yes, based on new discoveries of fossils (and to be discovered fossils) and newly (to be) developed techniques. To clone a dinosaur one requires well-preserved tissue that contains DNA, and techniques that take this DNA and create an actual dinosaur from it. It seems that for both of these points progress is made: Soft tissue ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible