Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

It seems the women in James Bond's love life often have provocative names: Honey Rider, Dr. No (1961): 1960s sexual position name for reverse cowgirl Domino Vitali/Petachi, Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983): Dominatrix? Kissy Suzuki, You Only Live Twice (1967): "kissing machine"? Tiffany Case, Diamonds Are Forever (1971): beautiful ...


11

In Never Say Never Again, (1983), James Bond plays "Domination" against Maximilian Largo. There's a video on Youtube.


10

Nick Nack never intends to help Bond. He just wants to lure Bond into the "funhouse", where Scaramanga is waiting to kill him. If I remember correctly, the movie opens with an assassin hired by Nick Nack going into the funhouse where he is stalked and killed by Scaramanga as practice. It seems to be part of Nick Nack's job. The scene is here.


10

There is also a Wikipedia entry on the character, which explains the meaning and origin: As with many of Ian Fleming's creations, the name is a double entendre—in this case with respect to pussy, which is both another word for a housecat and a slang term for vulva and vagina, while galore means an abundant or plentiful supply of something.


9

The meaning of the name "Pussy Galore" is essentially "abundant sex" (with "Pussy" meaning sex and "Galore" meaning abundant). The name "Pussy Galore" is intended to make viewers laugh. The humor is largely driven by how the name is such an obvious, crude reference to sex. Remember the movie came out in 1964, when audiences were much less de-sensitized ...


9

On the technical side, as Jonny Bones said, because Ian Fleming didn't write a code-name, he wrote a character. A character with his own backstory, personality, mannerisms likes & dislikes. A code-name would explain the changing faces and gadgets, but if you went with that idea, you would then have to explain how all the "James Bonds": Were Commanders ...


7

There's no concrete answers to why it's never acknowledged, but as Johnny Bones points outs, most of the films are based on books: Film                                        ...


7

While I cannot provide any hard proof or reference to back my claim, I would very clearly say that this was nothing else than a little self-refential side joke to lighten up the situation and which doesn't have much more significance than to make the audience smile at the use of this famous theme inside the movie and the little break of the fourth wall it ...


7

The article's only piece of evidence is the anagram, which strikes me as interesting but not conclusive. Rather than M being Silva's real mother, I think a key element of the story is that Silva and Bond had virtually identical past relationships with M: both Silva and Bond had been orphaned or abandoned as children, leading to each of them being selected ...


5

That's really a question only Ian Fleming can answer, but he did use double entendres quite often when naming his female characters. In this case the double entendre is (hidden because it's not polite conversation):


5

According to Wikipedia, Lazenby left the role on his agent's advice: Although Lazenby had been offered a contract for seven movies, his agent, Ronan O'Rahilly, convinced him that the secret agent would be archaic in the liberated 1970s, and as a result he left the series after the release of On Her Majesty's Secret Service in 1969. It also appears that ...


4

Strangely this was on TV yesterday so I can answer. It wasn't Felix Leiter at the end, it was Ladislav Kutze who was Largo's physicist. As he was a henchman, albeit one who redeemed himself by freeing Domino, we don't really care, so it's never resolved. More info about him here.


3

They don't really follow a building story (meaning the next one doesn't build on top of the previous) so you will not miss anything if you decide to watch them "out of order" if there was such a thing. If you are a purist and you want to absolutely see the evolution of style and tech in the stories and want to build upon legacy to get to where we are now, I ...


2

What could he do? The guards were all dead, at least they seemed so, the man watching the painting was in another building, and Severine being shot took him by surprise. I didn't think anything unusual or out of the ordinary.


2

Interestingly enough, there are other indicators that suggest that "James Bond" becomes the name of the new agent designated for the 007 slot, so that would logically provide the alias from his real identity...and anonymity for a few missions until an enemy agency picks up on the name. However, given tech these days, a permanent alias wouldn't do much good ...


1

The theme is a self referential joke, but in the example also a sign post. The contact Bond meets is Vijay Amritraj a famous Indian tennis player in a cameo. The use of the bond theme is to draw attention to him, and later when he is driving Bond and they are attacked, he uses a tennis racquet to defend himself.


1

Le Chiffre's Eye weeps when hes stressed (has a bad hand) its his "Tell".


1

While I don't remember that specific scene (not sure I've even seen the movie), this sounds once again quite like something the writers made up just for the story. As such it's rather hard to answer why Q would do it (because it's the same reason: just for the plot). Unless you've got some really nasty bug in your operating system or some insecure autorun ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible