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14

I, being a German and having heard a wide variety of different German dialects, can confirm to you that his accent was indeed a bit strange. And while Michael Fassbender didn't have too strong an accent, it was IMHO still identifyable as slightly English-based and thus was likely to arouse the suspicion from the Germans in that bar. Yet the accent wasn't ...


12

It's simple, really. What most screenwriters do is to write the entire script in the same language (which, in the case of Hollywood movies, is English) and then when there's a piece of dialog that's supposed to be spoken in some other language, say, French, all you do is to tell the reader this by adding a parenthesis between the character's name and the ...


12

A few tidbits that I can pull from looking at both David O. Selznick and Louis B. Mayer via Wikipedia: Louis B. Mayer was pretty much the figure head of MGM during its golden years, and is considered the creator of the "star system", focusing more on producing and advertising films around the stars in his films rather than the films themselves. David O. ...


12

I believe it depends on the viewer whether to take it as an indication to the accident or not. When we as viewers of the movie see the whole conversation happening in every moment we feel the fear of revelation of Shoshana's original identity to the Colonel, given we are already been introduced with his cunning and cold but cruel behavior. We feel such ...


11

I'd say this gesture was something so subtle and unconcious that it just falls below any cultural assimilation. He has "counted to three" in the "British way" all over his life and even excessive exposure to German native speakers and culture probably won't change such a highly non-descript and intuitive gesture. You can speak fluently in a language and be ...


8

It is probably not change in heart, I am afraid! In the first case you are referring to Coln. Landa said the quoted statement, while talking to LaPadite. The reason behind the sudden visit to his house was to search for the unaccounted for Jewish family in that area. To remind LaPadite about his unofficial nickname was a tactics of Landa, I believe, to ...


7

Well me and my wife both took German in high school and were taught by a native German. He told us the way that Germans count one with their thumb instead of with their fore finger. I always remembered this and she didn't. We both visited Germany through a student exchange program and became fluent in the language. While watching Inglorious Basterds I ...


4

There was a short period in Germany with Sütterlin or the older Kurrentschrift. The Sütterlin scripts were introduced in Prussia in 1915, and from the 1920s onwards began to replace the relatively similar old German handwriting (Kurrent) in schools. In 1935 the Sütterlin style officially became the only German script taught in schools. The Nazi ...


4

Shosanna shot Fredrick only because he became a hindrance to her plot. Under different circumstances she wouldn't need to shoot Fredrick. Fredrick is evidently quite besotted with Shosanna and time and again tries to vie for her attention. Even though Shosanna herself doesn't reciprocate those feelings, she nevertheless has a soft corner for him. So when ...


4

I think she felt pity for him. As if she regretted what she did. As you said, even running out of bullets wouldn't stop her from killing him another way, but that is if she definitely wanted to and I think that the answer here is no, at least later. She shot him at first because of her mission but she definitely felt something that stopped her from ...


4

Like you said, they most probably instructed von Hammersmark on the requirements to some degree. But I don't think they gave that many instructions, apart from the obvious ones that it should be a quite desolate little bar in the outskirts of Paris, without a high chance of German soldiers hanging around. Of course they could have told her much more things, ...


4

I found an article in the German newspaper Die Welt from 2009 "Quentin Tarantinos Spaß mit obskuren Namen" (Quentin Tarantinos fun with strange names): WELT ONLINE: Diane Kruger ist Bridget von Hammersmark, deutscher Filmstar und englische Agentin. Bridget/Brigitte klingt schon deutsch genug. Und dann noch "von Hammersmark". Das deutet sehr auf einen ...


2

The best I can find is that the various inspirations for the character were Ilona Massey, Zarah Leander, and Marlene Dietrich. Otherwise I can't find anything describing a reason for why the name Bridget was chosen, so it appears to simply be arbitrary.


2

Utivich being captured is not shown in the film, but it's quite reasonable to expect. There're numerous high rank Germans in the theater, Hitler included, so it's only reasonable that SS, Gestapo and other Germans' services pay extra attention to anything around the theater and expect some kind of subversive act. Now when Utivich and Raine are later ...


2

I seem to be in the minority here, but I actually think Col. Landa did not recognize Shosanna. He did not get a good look at her in the beginning of the film. And if he suspected she would try to get revenge, he would have to think it would be primarily directed at him. Why allow somebody to potentially interfere with his plans to defect? He wouldn't know ...


2

I'm almost positive he knows it's her. Those little things he says are just like his personality to poke at her. Inquiring deeper than most people about her aunt and uncle and how they died. Ordering milk for her knowing she had been taken in and saw her family murdered at a dairy farm, watching her as he said it. Jews in hiding weren't hiding because no ...



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